Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for New York State (New York, United States) or search for New York State (New York, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cayuga Indians, (search)
posed of the families of the Turtle, Bear, and Wolf, like the other cantons, and also those of the Beaver, Snipe, Heron, and Hawk. They were represented in the congress of the league by ten sachems. Through Jesuit missionaries the French made fruitless attempts to Christianize the Cayugas and win them over to the French interest, but found them uniformly enemies. During the Revolutionary War the Cayugas were against the colonists. They fought the Virginians at Point Pleasant in 1774. They hung upon the flank and rear of the army under Sullivan that invaded the territory of the Senecas in 1779; but they soon had their own villages destroyed, which greatly annoyed them. After the war they ceded their lands to the State of New York, excepting a small reservation. In 1800 some of them joined the Senecas, some went to the Grand River in Canada, and some to Sandusky, O., whence they were removed to the Indian Territory (q. v.). In 1899 there were only 161 left at the New York agency.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
claims protection to slaves from claims by Confederate owners.—22. Michael Hahn elected governor of Louisiana by the loyal vote. Moseby defeats Union cavalry at Drainesville.—23. Admiral Farragut began a six days bombardment of Fort Powell, below Mobile.—March 2. Ulysses S. Grant made lieutenant-general.—6. Confederates hung twenty-three Union prisoners of war (one a drummer-boy aged fifteen) at Kinston, N. C.—7. Vallandigham advises forcible resistance to United States authority.—8. New York State voted by over 30,000 majority for the soldiers' voting law.—9. Colored troops under Colonel Cole captured Suffolk, Va.—15. President Lincoln calls for 200,000 men in addition to the 500,000 called for Feb. 1. —16. Governor of Kentucky remonstrates against employing slaves in the army. Arkansas votes to become a free-labor State.—17. General Grant assumes command of all the armies of the republic. Fort de Russy blown up by the National forces.—28. Louisiana State Constit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, Charles 1690-1773 (search)
Ulster county, about 60 miles up the Hudson and 8 miles from it, in 1731, and there formed a settlement, he pursuing the occupation of farmer and surveyor. He was justice of the peace, county judge, and lieutenant-colonel of Ulster county, to which he gave its name. Two of his four sons were generals in the war for independence, and his youngest (George) was governor of the State of New York and Vice-President of the United States. He died in Ulster (now Orange) county, N. Y., Nov. 19, 1773.Ulster county, about 60 miles up the Hudson and 8 miles from it, in 1731, and there formed a settlement, he pursuing the occupation of farmer and surveyor. He was justice of the peace, county judge, and lieutenant-colonel of Ulster county, to which he gave its name. Two of his four sons were generals in the war for independence, and his youngest (George) was governor of the State of New York and Vice-President of the United States. He died in Ulster (now Orange) county, N. Y., Nov. 19, 1773.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, George 1739- (search)
it in his native county. In 1768 he was elected a member of the Provincial Assembly, wherein lie soon became the head of a Whig minority. In 1775 he was elected to the Continental Congress, and voted for the resolution for independence in 1776; but the invasion of New York by the British from the sea called him home, and he did not sign the Declaration of Independence. He was appointed a brigadier-general, and as such performed good service in his State. On the organization of the State of New York, in 1777, he was elected the first governor, and held the office, by successive elections, eighteen years. He was very energetic, both in civil and military affairs, until the end of the war; and was chiefly instrumental in preventing the consummation of the British plan for separating New England from the rest of the Union by the occupation of a line of military posts, through the Hudson and George Clinton. Champlain valleys, from New York to the St. Lawrence. In 1788 Governor Clin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, James 1736-1812 (search)
Clinton, James 1736-1812 Military officer; born in Ulster (now Orange) county, N. Y., Aug. 9, 1736; son of Charles Clinton; was well educated, but he had a strong inclination for military life. Before the beginning of the Revolutionary War he was lieutenant-colonel of the militia of Ulster county. He was a captain under Bradstreet in the capture of Fort Frontenac in 1758; and he afterwards was placed in command of four regiments for the protection of the frontiers of Ulster and Orange Clinton, in the Hudson Highlands, when it was attacked in October, 1777. James Clinton. In 1779 he joined Sullivan's expedition against the Senecas with 1,500 men. He was stationed at Albany during a great part of the war; but he was present at the surrender of Cornwallis. General Clinton was a commissioner to adjust the boundary-line between New York and Pennsylvania; and was a member of both the Assembly and Senate of the State of New York. He died in Little Britain, N. Y., Dec. 22, 1812.
, In general terms a collection of laws, the most notable of which in modern times is the Code Napoleon, which was promulgated between 1803 and 1810, and has since been adopted in large part by various countries. In the United States the most notable codes are those prepared by Judge Stephen J. Field (q. v.) for use in California. at the time of its admission into the Union, and the Codes of Civil and criminal procedure prepared by his brother, David Dudley field (q. v.), for the State of New York. The latter, after completing the abovementioned work, was appointed by the legislature chairman of a commission to prepare a political code, a penal code, and a civil code, which, with the codes of procedure alluded to, were designed to take the place of the common law, and to cover the entire range of American law. A number of the States have adopted in whole or in part this last class of codes. Mr. Field also actively urged the preparation of a code of international law, and perso
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colonial settlements. (search)
p the Hudson River. The government of Holland granted exclusive privilege to Amsterdam merchants to traffic with the Indians on the Hudson, and the country was called New Netherland. The Dutch West India Company was formed in 1621, with unrestricted control over New Netherland. They bought Manhattan Island of the Indians for about $24, paid chiefly in cheap trinkets, and in 1623 thirty families from Holland landed there and began a settlement. Then were laid the foundations of the State of New York, as New Netherland was called after it passed into the possession of the English. Late in 1620 a company of English Puritans (Puritans) who had fled from persecution to Holland, crossed the Atlantic and landed on the shores of Massachusetts, by permission of the Plymouth Company (see Plymouth Company). They built a town and called it New Plymouth; they organized a civil government and called themselves Pilgrims. Others came to the shores of Massachusetts soon afterwards, and tile pre
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut tract, the (search)
Connecticut tract, the Grants by the English crown to New York and Massachusetts overlapped. In 1786 a convention of commissioners from the two colonies was held at Hartford, Conn.; Massachusetts ceded to the State of New York all that territory lying west of the present eastern boundary of New York, and New York ceded to Massachusetts a tract of territory running from the northern boundary of Pennsylvania due north through Seneca Lake to Lake Ontario, with the exception of a strip of land one mile wide on Niagara River—about 6,000,000 acres in all. Of this M. Gorham and O. Phelps bought the title of the Indians, and also the title of Massachusetts to 2,600,000 acres. Robert Morris purchased most of the remainder and sold a part of it to Sir William Pultney. He sold another large portion to the Holland Company and to the State of Connecticu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Curry, Daniel -1887 (search)
Curry, Daniel -1887 Clergyman; born near Peekskill, N. Y., Nov. 26, 1809; graduated at Wesleyan College in 1837; accepted a professorship at the female college of Macon, Ga., in 1839; was ordained in the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1841, and held several charges in Georgia. When the denomination was divided into the Northern and Southern branches he settled in New York State, where he filled a number of important appointments. He was editor of the Christian advocate in 1864-76; the National repository in 1876-80; and the Methodist review in 1884-87. His publications include New York: a Historical sketch; Platform papers; Lifestory of Bishop D. W. Clark, etc. He died in New York City, Aug. 17, 1887.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Curtis, George William 1824- (search)
ough Harper's monthly, in the department of The easy chair. In 1871 President Grant appointed Mr. Curtis one of a commission to draw up rules for the regulation of the civil service. He was a member of the constitutional convention of the State of New York in 1868, in which he was chairman of the committee on education. In 1864 he was appointed one of the regents of the University of the State of New York. He died Aug. 31, 1892. The spoils system. The following is an abridgment of hisState of New York. He died Aug. 31, 1892. The spoils system. The following is an abridgment of his celebrated speech on the evils of the spoils system in politics, delivered before the American Social Science Association, in Saratoga, N. Y., Sept. 8, 1881: The spoils spirit struggled desperately to obtain possession of the national administration from the day of Jefferson's inauguration to that of Jackson's, when it succeeded. Its first great but undesigned triumph was the decision of the first Congress, in 1789, vesting the sole power of removal in the President, a decision which pl
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