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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 88 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 44 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for New York State (New York, United States) or search for New York State (New York, United States) in all documents.

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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 2: early political action and military training. (search)
ection in the autumn of 1852. They had no doubt of that, because the candidate we all looked for was Judge Levi Woodbury, the friend and twice appointed cabinet officer of Jackson, and the able and upright Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. In this, however, we were unhappily disappointed by his too early death in the following October. His selection as a Democratic candidate for the presidency in 1848 was undoubtedly prevented by the unhappy controversies in the State of New York, which were carried into the national convention, of which I was a member, and which resulted in the withdrawal of the friends of Mr. Van Buren and the Free-Soil rupture in the party, with Van Buren for a candidate at the election. Notwithstanding the defeat of the Coalitionists in the election of 1852, the proposition to have a constitutional convention in Massachusetts, which had failed in 1851 by a majority of five thousand votes, was renewed by the legislature of 1852, and was c
its services. Not that all would not have done so if they had had an opportunity or full instruction; but in Lowell about that time there happened to be a couple of live men,--Colonel Jones, who is now the lieutenant-governor of the great State of New York, and myself,--who believed beyond peradventure that we should soon be called upon. In accordance with this message of the governor, the legislature on the 23d day of January, passed a resolve, a portion of which is as follows:-- Wheretake the responsibility of giving you an order to march, and shall expect it to be obeyed. Here Red Nose lighted up and said:-- General Butler, you don't appear to be aware that a general of United States militia has no right to command New York State troops. No, sir, said I, I am not aware of that, and it is not the law. Have you got a copy of the Articles of War in your pocket? No, sir. Have you examined them? No, sir; but I was educated at West Point. That was the first t
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
enj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. There had been great complaint in the New York Times that General Wool had not been given some place where his great experience would have a fair chance to benefit the country. It was argued by the Times in an editorial after the battle of Bull Run, that there should be a dictator who should take Lincoln's place and carry on the war, and that George Law should be that dictator. As this was not done at once, there was a cry that the great State of New York should have another major-general in the army. It was urged that there was in New York a major-general of the regular army--General Wool--who had lived for a great many years in a state of retiracy, and that he should have a command in the army suited to his rank, and that it was the duty of the President to have him assigned to such command. Now, the President well knew that General Wool could not do anything, simply because he was too old and infirm, a fact that he knew as well a
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
se you will take my nomination of its officers. To this he made no reply, and we again parted amicably. I procured the Agricultural Fair Grounds, within a couple of miles of my house at Lowell, as a place of encampment, and named it Camp Chase, and in a few days I got a large number of recruits. I was fully content with Colonel Jones, of whom I had a very high appreciation. He was well known as a leading Democrat, and still remains in that position as lieutenant-governor of the State of New York. Meanwhile, except for those recruits who came to me because of their respect for my position, and because of their confidence in me and my officers, recruiting had substantially ceased in the State. It was difficult to get many soldiers. Massachusetts was very far behind in her quota, and she always remained so until she imported Germans in large numbers to fill up her ranks, and, in the latter part of the war, sent down to Virginia and paid money to have negroes whom I had enlis
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
esired to ascertain the facts from him. He said he had been wholly misrepresented. Well, I said, . I supposed so, and I rely upon you to correct that matter by having the report withdrawn, or, if that cannot be done, by making some explanatory statement. He said he certainly would, and there the matter ended. I then reported to the commander of the Department of the East, General Dix, and he issued an order that I was in command of the troops sent to preserve the peace in the State of New York. I suggested to him that he should put me in command of the military district comprising the States of New York and New Jersey, as he had command of the whole department, but he expressed a disinclination so to do, and I, after a conference, yielded and said I would report to the Secretary of War for orders, but that I hoped it would not be necessary. I asked him how many regulars could be spared from the garrison on Governor's Island. He said he thought he could let me have five
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 20: Congressman and Governor. (search)
nding the platform, because I knew how a man from a State like Indiana would construe it. But the delegation of the State of New York carried the nomination of Mr. Cleveland by insisting upon voting as a unit, by voting a majority, which States had ersey the fusion also failed. The only hope was then in my drawing enough votes from the Democratic party from the State of New York to prevent its throwing its vote for Cleveland. I was supported by the strongest man, the one of the greatest influence that I knew in the State of New York, Mr. John Kelly, who represented the opposition to Mr. Cleveland. Election day came, and there were votes enough thrown for me several times over to have prevented Mr. Cleveland's election, but in many of the polling-places they were counted not for me, but for Cleveland, and so the electoral ticket for the State of New York was counted for him by a few hundred votes only. At first I intended to have an investigation made to prove the facts I ha
etary of the Treasury and when his opinion is received instructions will be sent to you by telegraph. Your obedient servant, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. [no. 89. see page 758.] headquarters, City of New York, Nov. 5, 1864. General Order No. 1. In obedience to the orders of the President and by the assignment of Major-General Dix commanding Department of the East, Major-General Butler assumes command of the troops arriving and about to arrive, detailed for duty in the State of New York to meet existing emergencies. To correct misapprehension; to soothe the fears of the weak and timid; to allay the nervousness of the ill-advised; to silence all false rumors circulated by bad men for wicked purposes, and to contradict once and for all false statements adapted to injure the government in the respect and confidence of the people — the commanding general takes occasion to declare that troops have been detailed for duty in this district sufficient to preserve the peace
an, 218. U United States of Columbia concedes land, 904. Ursuline Convent, 110-123; bill for relief of sufferers at brought by Butler, 113. Usher, Col. Roland G., warden of State prison, Massachusetts, 974. V Van Buren, Martin, first political speech made in favor of, 77; presidential candidacy in 1848, 117, 131. Van Dorm, General, at Vicksburg, 258, 463, 478; orders Breckenridge to attack Baton Rouge, 481. Van Lieu, Miss, letter to Butler, 640. Van Nostrand & Co., N. Y., 834. Van Vliet, Assistant Quartermaster-General, secures Butler's headquarters in New York, 750. Varina road, Butler's ride upon, 734-735; Butler's headquarters near, 738. Vernon, Mrs., 79. Vicksburg, military operations, 454, 464, 477, 480; reference to, 670. Victoria, Queen, reference to medal presented to Crimean soldiers, 742. Volunteer Militia, membership in, 123, 127; taught how to cook, 196; Butler appointed brigadier-general of, 126. Voorhees, Colonel, attacked, 6