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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,126 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 528 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 402 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 296 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 246 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 230 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 214 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 28, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) or search for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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ged in cutting it away to make encampments. Some others said it was the burning of the bridge over Mill Creek, by the Hamptonians. This last was the true surmise. That bridge has been destroyed by the Hampton people — burnt up. Several steamers are said to have reached Old Point Sunday morning--supposed to have conveyed to that post large reinforcements. The steamer Minnesota left Old Point on Saturday evening with troops, destined, it is said, for some point on the coast of North Carolina. Ocracoke is prepared to resist a landing from boats, the only mode by which a landing can be effected there; and defences are erecting at Hatteras by officers of the N. C. Navy. It is reported, while I am writing, that the Ape's minions have effected a landing near Elizabeth City; but I place no confidence in the rumor. Also, I hear that troops from Old Point have landed at Newport News, simply to prevent the erection of batteries by our men, and the rumor is no doubt well founded.
North Carolina. The Wilmington Journal, of Friday evening, thus sums up the action of the North Carolina State Convention: The Convention, presided over by Hon. Weldon N. Edwards, of Warren, has, as everybody knows, passed the Ordinance of Secession, and also adopted the Provisional Government of the Confederate StatesNorth Carolina State Convention: The Convention, presided over by Hon. Weldon N. Edwards, of Warren, has, as everybody knows, passed the Ordinance of Secession, and also adopted the Provisional Government of the Confederate States. The ordinances for these purposes have been signed by all the members. So far the movements of the Convention were made unanimous. In the order of procedure, the ratification of the permanent Constitution of the Confederate States ought to have come next, and we presume would have done so, had there been a certified copy of sfore the Convention. The other matters already mooted in the Convention are--First. The preparation of an address setting forth the causes which induced North Carolina to separate herself from the late United States. This arises out of and in connection with the passage of the Ordinance of Secession. Second. There will pr
The war rumors. --Various rumors were circulated in our streets yesterday in relation to the Hampton fight, as also reported disturbances elsewhere, but owing to the great difficulty at getting at anything certain, we forbear from any further mention of them. Our Portsmouth correspondent mentions the landing of Federal troops at Newport Nows, as also an invasion of the soil of North Carolina.
From Norfolk.[special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Norfolk May 27, 1861. More troops arrived here Saturday. Like those who preceded them, they are a fine set of men, who betoken good service in the approaching conflict. North Carolina will send to us in a day or two numbers of her gallant soldiers. Our forces at this time number many thousands, well skilled in the use of arms; and under the leadership of such a man as Lee, will prove invincible. Col. Huger is at his post, and assists ably in the discharge of his duties. Luna.
nemy, disappointed and exasperated at her course, may choose to make it. The Southern Government has shown the appreciation in which they hold this vote by the prompt manner in which they have moved their headquarters to Richmond. After the vote of Thursday they can feel at home in Virginia and their heroism impels them to accept upon her soil her own fate. The effect of this remarkable vote of Virginia will be very great in Europe, supported as it is by the spirited proceedings of North Carolina and Tennessee, and the recent accession of Arkansas to the Confederacy. The question of recognizing seven States in setting up an independent government against twenty-four, is a very different one from that of recognizing eleven States, led by so ancient a Commonwealth as Virginia, acting by authority of a unanimous popular vote — and the secession of the eleven supported by the neutrality of three others. The policy of recognizing the popular choice of rulers has been acknowledged by