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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 30, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 3 document sections:

se the papers are chiefly filled with news concerning. General Ewell's march in Maryland and Pennsylvania. A dispatch from McConnelsburg, dated on the 23d, asserts on the authority of two Confederate deserters that the whole of Ewell's corps is within the State of Pennsylvania, and that the rebels are overrunning Franklin. They had taken Mercersburg in the same county, and driven in the Federad Antietam fords, and that it has been going on since Friday or Saturday last. The people of Pennsylvania must now be prepared to defend their soil from the tread of the invader, for devastation, plurough Martinsburg, and large numbers of horses, the fruits of plander in Western Maryland and Pennsylvania. The advance up the Peninsula. The plan of the Yankee raid up the Peninsula, as we gcky, with 5,000 rebel cavalry. Only 21 regiments have been sent from other States to aid Pennsylvania in driving back the Confederates. A Pennsylvania letter writer gives the following whine
Our army in Pennsylvania. The New York Herald, of the 26th inst, has been received in this city, and from it we learn that our advance was, at the latest dates, six miles beyond Carlisle, in the direction of Harrisburg. Now as Carlisle is eighteen miles from Harrisburg, our forces must be within twelve miles of that city, We may well imagine the terror of the Yankees, when we recollect how horror-stricken they The panic, indeed, so far from subsiding appears to be gathering strength withor even the Times, or in fact any other Northern journal that has tried its hand at prophesying. Some suppose that he means to attack Washington and Baltimore, some that his object is Philadelphia come that he merely means to make a raid into Pennsylvania, and return, and some again that be intends to carry on the war on the enemy's soil, and make it support itself. Where so many doctors disagree it were lolly in us to pretend to decide. We only know that he means to do something, but what it
The Daily Dispatch: June 30, 1863., [Electronic resource], Gen. Lee's army — its advance in to Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
Gen. Lee's army — its advance in to Maryland and Pennsylvania. The army of Gen. Lee is still on its march Northward, and thus far has met with no opposition. A gentleman who left Charlestown Jefferson county, on Thursday last, in forms us that the last of our forces, the division of Gen. Pender, passed through Smithfield, i Valley of Virginia no flour was being purchased for the army, all the supplies being secured north of the Potomac. The cavalry raids of Gen. Jenkins into Pennsylvania had been crowned with great success. On his first raid he went over into Fulton county, where he secured over a thousand horses and a large number of cattle at of horses, numbering 1,200 or 1,300, were sent in by Gen. Jenkins, the result of his second raid among the rich farmers of the Cumberland and core valleys in Pennsylvania. Prom these facts some idea may be formed of the value of invasion to the Confederacy. Our troops were in fine spirit, and rejoicing at the improvement i