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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

countrymen; but, nevertheless, it weighs upon the hearts of the weak and despondent. It is rather astonishing that though Savannah, a large and populous city, a wealthy community, in ordinary times a thriving port, and one which now gives much solicitude to our enemy, is in danger from a forbear enough to exchange signals with, and the sound of whose drums can frequently be distinguished from, our lower batteries, yet we are apparently more anxious about the positions in Kentucky and Tennessee than our own. There is something wrong in all this; the people have gone to sleep and want to be roughly awakened by some calamity, to teach them the urgent, the absolute necessity of rousing all their energies to meet the onset of our enemy. They must be taught not to despise their power or to decry their courage; it is the worst foe we now have, that overweening self-confidence in our own prowess and ability to match with strong arms and valiant hearts all the inequalities of the presen
The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1862., [Electronic resource], Land Operations of the Potomac Flotilla. (search)
ere quoted dull at 92 ¼a92 ½ American securities closed heavy. In the Federal Senate, the bill appropriating seven millions of dollars for the completion of fortifications, was passed. The New York cotton market was less active, and middling uplands were quoted at 29a30 cents. Bennett's Herald crows lustily over the Federal victories on the coast of North Carolina and at Fort Henry, in Tennessee, and says that the rebel leaders have no idea of holding Virginia, Kentucky, nor Tennessee. In the Federal Senate a clause has been inserted in the Treasury note bill requiring that the interest on bonds which are to be sureties for the notes shall be paid in coin. The news of the capture of Roanoke Island was sent to Europe in the New York Herald, by the steamer Africa, which sailed on the 12th inst. Nothing of importance appears in the Northern papers in relation to affairs on the Potomac. A dispatch from Cincinnati, dated the 12th inst., says that the Fede
s been planted on the walls of a rebel fort in Western Tennessee by the gallant blue jackets. Officers and mena graduate of West Point; Maj. W. L. McCommice, of Tennessee, assistant Adjutant General; Captain H. L. Jones, y, Brigadier Quartermaster; Capt. J. H. Hayden, of Tennessee, Chief of Engineers; Capt. John McLoughlin, of TenTennessee, Quartermaster; Capt. Jesse Taylor, of Tennessee, commanding garrison; Capt. G. R. G. Jones, of TennesseTennessee, commanding garrison; Capt. G. R. G. Jones, of Tennessee; Lieut. W. Ormsby Watts; Lieut. Frederick J. Wellen, and sixty privates. The guns taken in the fort are oTennessee; Lieut. W. Ormsby Watts; Lieut. Frederick J. Wellen, and sixty privates. The guns taken in the fort are one 128 pounder, into the muzzle of which an eight-inch shell was fired by one of the gunboats; one 24-pounder r Tennessee, 4th Mississippi, 48th Tennessee, 51 at Tennessee, 15th Arkansas, one hundred Alabama troops, and five hundred Tennessee cavalry. They fled early in the battle. Our land forces did not participate in the actionishing welcome by numerous Union families in Southern Tennessee and Northern Alabama, and at the towns along
The news from Tennessee. Official and private dispatches, received yesterday, confirm the news of the fight at Fort Donelson, and the repulse of the enemy at every point during the two days excrement. It was supposed that the conflict would be renewed yesterday, and the public await the result with intense anxiety.