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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 10, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 6 document sections:

, when our army withdrew in good order, and retired to Corinth, Mississippi. General B. adds, in his telegram, that he was unable to carry off all the arms and ammunition captured on Sunday. Corinth is near the line dividing the States of Tennessee and Mississippi, and about eighteen miles from the battle-ground of Sunday. The policy of General Beauregard in retiring to this point is commended by those familiar with the topography of the country, and it is confidently believed that he winder Buell is a heavy one, but it dare not penetrate the interior, where it will be deprived of the efficient aid of gunboats and river transports. As he advances the hostile territory in his rear increase, and the gallant sons of Kentucky and Tennessee, who are measurably relieved by this advance, will omit no opportunity to annoy, if not capture and destroy, his transportation trains. Altogether, he will have a rather disagreeable time of it, and the grand object of his mission — the subjug
or calling the States, to go through with the committees. Motion prevailed. Mr. Harris, of Mo., from the Military Committee, reported back the bill for the appointment of drill masters for the Confederate army, and asked the committee to be discharged from the farther consideration of the bill. Mr. Rugsell, of Va., called up the bill reported from the Committee of Ways and Means, relative to the suspension of the collection of the war tax in certain States. Mr. Keiskell, of Tennessee, from the Judiciary Committee, reported back a bill to punish forgery and counterfeiting, and asked that the committee be discharged. Mr. Curry, from the Committee on Commerce, reported back a memorial for the suppression of whiskey distillation and the desecration of the Sabbath, and asked that the committee be discharged. Also, a memorial on a new system of weights and coins, and asked that the same be referred to the commission upon the subject, raised under the act of the Pro
ay, and were forwarded to Fort Delaware. The commissioners appointed to examine the Western Department, under Gen. Fremont's administration, have made a report exposing gross frauds and wide-spread demoralization among the official circles and their dependents in that Department, but exculpating the merchants, mechanizes and manufacturers from any share in these frauds. At last accounts Col. Carter, in command of the Tennessee Union troops, had possession of Jackson borough, in East Tennessee, having made his advance through what is known as Baptist Gap. Capt. Milward, of Col. Mundly's cavalry battalion, was the first to enter the town with his company. The force of rebels at Cumberland Gap is variously estimated, and are said to be receiving some reinforcements. An Arkansas correspondent of the St. Louis Republican asserts "that a note has been received by General Seigel from the Confederate Governor of Arkansas, saying that, if they were not driven out of this State i
ngdon, a new regiment, of eleven companies--four of which, the reader will be pleased to learn, are recruited from one of the most decided Union localities of East Tennessee. Capt. Dunn informs us, further, that from the same Union region in Tennessee one or more regiments, with proper measures, may be readily recruited. We hTennessee one or more regiments, with proper measures, may be readily recruited. We have not a doubt that the restoration of General Floyd to his command will be the signal for a patriotic rallying of the men of Southwestern Virginia and Eastern Tennessee, and that in the ensuing month he will be able to take the field with a strong force, having entire confidence in a commander whom they will follow with pride thrEastern Tennessee, and that in the ensuing month he will be able to take the field with a strong force, having entire confidence in a commander whom they will follow with pride through the struggles and trials of war. Not doubting that the President will set upon his own sense of duty and responsibility in the premises, we can but hope that, the ends of discipline being answered, he may find it agreeable to gratify the prayer of the petitioners, and restore to active life in the field a man who has prov
The Daily Dispatch: April 10, 1862., [Electronic resource], Messrs. West & Johnston, publishers. (search)
ill appear in due time, and be welcomed all the more fervently for the inevitable delay of its publication. The romance by Mrs. McCord Vernon, the author of the Battle Call, (with which our readers are doubters familiar,) is in press, and will be forthcoming shortly.--Also, a collection of the Lyrics of the War, edited by Dr. Sheppardson, the well-known "Bohemian" of the Richmond Dispatch.--Messrs. West & Johnston have also published, lately, some fine Maps of the Spot of War in Kentucky, Tennessee, and the two Carolinas.--The Southern Spy has reached a second edition; and Cause and Central is still selling rapidly. What higher evidence of the courage and enterprise of these publishers could be given than the foregoing list? The army and the public owe a debt of thanks to Messrs. W & J. for the exertions they have made for their instruction and entertainment during these perilous days, when almost everybody is afraid to risk a penny unless backed by the Government.-- Southern Liter
s character. The inquiry runs along, and what is the conclusion reached? They complain of lost rights, and say they have been deprived of their just and constitutional rights in the Territories. Permit me to make an inquiry, in no offensive sense, out simply that I may be understood — another inquiry. What right has been denied, what privilege withhold, what prerogatives lest, under the Constitution and laws of the United States by any citizen thereof, and particularly a citizen of Tennessee? What one? Can you tell? Can you point it cut? Can you take up the Constitution and call attention to any fight there guaranteed which you have lest? Can you see it — smell it — taste it — feel it? You may tax all your faculties and cannot tell what right has been lost. What excuse, then, is there for all this turmoil of war? What has the South lost, under the Constitution, that palladium of our liberties framed by the patriotic fathers of another century?--Slavery is the reply.