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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 16, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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al Teasham had visited Brownsville and sympathizes with our cause. He says his mission is to keep the mouth of the Rio Grands open to the trade of the world, at all hazards. England is reported to have withdrawn from the alliance against Mexico. A fleet of 800 guns is at Vera Crtz expecting to sail immediately for New Orleans and the Southern coast. How the women make powder. We copy a portion of a letter addressed to Lieut. McClung at Knoxville, by a lady in Sullivan county, East Tennessee: "I saw some weeks ago in the Register an article on the Making of saltpetre and that the under houses contained more or less I also learned that the Government was in great need of in order to make powder for our brave boys now in the field. Well, sir, I felt, though I am a woman that it was my duty to do what I could for my country; so having an old house with dry dirt under it, I determined to make a trial. I threw out the ashes in my ash hopper, and had two others built —
00. Late in the evening the Federal fell back, taking their dead and wounded from the field as far as possible — The engagement then ceased. Our victory was then complete, though dear bought. Many of the braves spirits of the Confederacy fell Tennessee, while she has her part of the glory, has more than her share of the glorious dead Tennessee has redeemed herself; if there was a state upon her fair ex, on account of Donelson or Mill Springs, it has been forever wiped out with their own preciTennessee has redeemed herself; if there was a state upon her fair ex, on account of Donelson or Mill Springs, it has been forever wiped out with their own precious blood on the plains of Mississippi. Our line of battle extended fourteen miles; the right was commanded by Gen. Johnston; the centre by General Beauregard, and the left by Gen. Cheatham. As the day advanced, the enemy threw their whole fore on the left wing, when Gen. Beauregard changed his position to that wing. Another account. The Memphis Appeal, of Tuesday, has the following from its correspondent: En armende for my brusqueness at the passed you, and in compliance
art of this Government, the enemy was conveying the prisoners captured at Fort Donelson to Chicago and other points most distant from their homes, and was parading the officers who fell into their power through the entire of the land, from Western Tennessee to Fort Warren, in Boston harbor, where they are now incarcerated; and up to the present moment not a single officer taken at Fort Donelson, nor a single captive privateer, has been restored to his home, while the United States have kept poon to him, has been seized and imprisoned for this, the slightest display of humanity. If this conduct is not sufficient to make the blood boil in the heart of every loyal citizen, then let him read the account of the treatment of Union men in Tennessee, as shown by that venerable moral hero. Person Brownlow, and then let them say to our Government, no longer permit as to be insulted by such displays as are being exhibited in our midst. As the present commandant of this Military District is
Col. Bumpass, a well-known politician of Tennessee, is dead.