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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 16, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

From North Georgia and Tennessee. --The Federals now hold the Raccoon Mountain and the valley of Chattanooga beyond Chattanooga creek. The Federal fortifications seen are two forts in front of Chattanooga, with casemated batteries.--They are about one mile apart, and the same distance from the city and river. There are two lines of earthworks seen on their centre, besides rifle pits for their pickets. Their line of defences from the river above to the river below, present the form of a bow-string, with the river for the bow well bent. Their tents are pitched in close and regular order, and are so disclosed as to show to bad advantage. A correspondent of the Atlanta Register thinks there is not exceeding fifteen or twenty thousand men in Chattanooga, though there are doubtless thousands of others near. The half-way house on Lookout Mountain has not been destroyed by the enemy's shells, as reported. The scenery from Lookout is said to be surpassingly beautiful.
ps, and relieved General Longstreet on Lookout Mountain. The latter has gone with 16,000 troops, part of cavalry, to East Tennessee. The balance of the cavalry have gone to Iuka. Cheatham's and Stuart's divisions have returned, and Bragg has now try have gone in pursuit. Averill has arrived. B F Kelley, Brig. Gen. The affair at Rogersville — Richardson in Tennessee. The Baltimore American, of the 13th, referring to the Federal disaster at Rogersville, Tennessee, says: It was reported a few days since that two of General Burnside's outposts in Tennessee had been attacked by the enemy, and a portion of two regiments captured. We are now informed that the disaster occurred at Rodgersville, in Hawkins county, Tennessee, f the Potomac and the menacing attitude of the Army of the Cumberland, the concentration of a superior rebel force in East Tennessee is scarcely probable, but the rebels are exceedingly anxious to repossess themselves of that important region, the ta
East Tennessee. Abingdon, Nov. 14. --Nothing further from East Tennessee. Weather cloudy, and a slight snow falling. East Tennessee. Abingdon, Nov. 14. --Nothing further from East Tennessee. Weather cloudy, and a slight snow falling.
Matters in Knoxville. --Trade Regulated.--In the Knoxville Daily Bulletin we find, under the glaring caption, "United States Trade Regulation," an exposition of the proposed plans of the "Board of Trade for the Department of East Tennessee:" By section first, a "Local Agent" is appointed, whose headquarters are at the "Custom House," on Gay street. Knoxville is declared to be the only "port" to be furnished with goods, wares and merchandize in the Department of East Tennessee. STennessee. Samuel Rogers is made the Local Agent, who will grant all permits for bringing in goods. All goods brought in without his sanction are feited. By the next section, a fee of three dollars is exacted for each permit to import, and the tradesman must take the following oath: "You do solemnly swear that you are in all respects loyal and true to the Government of the United States; that you will faithfully conform to the Proclamation and Orders of the President of the United States, and o