Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) or search for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 185 results in 102 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Doty, James Duane, 1799-1865 (search)
rnor; born in Salem, N. Y., in 1799; studied law and settled in Detroit; member of the Michigan legislature in 1834, and there introduced the bill which provided for the division of Michigan and the establishment of the Territories of Iowa and Wisconsin. He aided in founding Madison, Wis., which city was made the capital of the State through his efforts. He held a seat in Congress in 1836-41 and 1849-53; governor of Wisconsin in 1841-44; and was appointed governor of Utah in 1864. He died istudied law and settled in Detroit; member of the Michigan legislature in 1834, and there introduced the bill which provided for the division of Michigan and the establishment of the Territories of Iowa and Wisconsin. He aided in founding Madison, Wis., which city was made the capital of the State through his efforts. He held a seat in Congress in 1836-41 and 1849-53; governor of Wisconsin in 1841-44; and was appointed governor of Utah in 1864. He died in Salt Lake City, Ut., June 13, 1865.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Durrie, Daniel Steele, 1819- (search)
Durrie, Daniel Steele, 1819- Antiquarian; born in Albany, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1819; appointed librarian of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin in 1858; published genealogies of the Steele and Holt families; also a Bibliographica Genealogica Americana; History of Madison, Wis.; History of Missouri; and the Wisconsin biographical dictionary. Durrie, Daniel Steele, 1819- Antiquarian; born in Albany, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1819; appointed librarian of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin in 1858; published genealogies of the Steele and Holt families; also a Bibliographica Genealogica Americana; History of Madison, Wis.; History of Missouri; and the Wisconsin biographical dictionary.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Elective franchise. (search)
n cities of the first and second class; in Nebraska and Iowa in cities of 2,500 population and over; in North Dakota in cities of over 3,000; in Ohio in some cities; in Maine in towns of 500 or more voters; in South Dakota in cities and towns of over 1,000 voters and in counties where registration has been adopted by popular vote; in Tennessee in all counties of 50,000 or more inhabitants; in New York in all cities and villages of over 5,000 population; in Missouri in cities of 100,000; in Wisconsin in some cities. In Washington in cities and towns and in voting precincts having 250 voters or more. In Texas cities of 10,000 or over may require registration. In Rhode Island non-taxpayers are required to register before Dec. 31, each year. Registration is prohibited by constitutional provision in Arkansas and West Virginia. The qualifications for voting in each State and the classes excluded from suffrage are as follows: Alabama Citizen or alien who has declared intentio
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ely, Richard Theodore, 1854- (search)
Ely, Richard Theodore, 1854- Political economist; born in Ripley, N. Y., April 13, 1854; graduated at Columbia University in 1876; became Professor of Political Economy in the University of Wisconsin in 1892. Among his works are French and German socialism; Taxation in American States; Socialism and social reform; The social law of service; The labor movement in America, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Exemptions from taxation. (search)
rty. Texas. Household furniture up to $250, books, maps, etc., school and church property. Vermont. Household furniture up to $500, libraries, tools of mechanics and farmers, machinery of manufactories, hay and grain sufficient to winter stock, school and church property. Virginia. Public libraries and libraries of ministers, all farm products in hand of producer, church and school property. Washington. Each taxable entitled to $300 exemption from total valuation, free and school libraries, church property up to $5,000, public schools, cemeteries, fire engines. West Virginia. Public and family libraries, unsold products of preceding year of manufactories and farms, colleges, academies, free schools, church property in use, parsonages and furniture. Wisconsin. Kitchen furniture, all libraries, growing crops, school property with land not exceeding 40 acres, church property in actual use. Wyoming. Public libraries, church and school property.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fairchild, Lucius 1831-1896 (search)
Fairchild, Lucius 1831-1896 Military officer; born in Kent, O., Dec. 27, 1831; removed with his father to Wisconsin in 1846, but returned in 1855. At the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted, and in August, 1861, was commissioned captain in the regular army and major in the volunteers. He took part in the battle of Bull Run, and at Antietam went to the front from the hospital; he led the charge up Seminary Hill at the battle of Gettysburg, and was badly wounded, losing his left arm. Heook part in the battle of Bull Run, and at Antietam went to the front from the hospital; he led the charge up Seminary Hill at the battle of Gettysburg, and was badly wounded, losing his left arm. He was promoted to brigadier-general in 1863, but left the service to serve as Secretary of State of Wisconsin. He was afterwards elected governor, and served six consecutive terms. In 1886 he was elected commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic. He died in Madison, Wis., May 23, 1896.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Farmers' Institutes. (search)
t clearly before the lawmakers to secure the needed funds. One of the first States to reach such a financial basis as made the doing of good work possible was Wisconsin, and that State may be taken as a type of one form of institute management. There the money appropriated by the State is put into the hands of the State universcurate and improved practical methods are introduced the sooner will wealth flow towards that community. The present condition of the dairy interest in the State of Wisconsin may be pointed out as well illustrating this proposition. No State in the Union to-day has a higher standing as to the product of its dairies. As regards ods with which the successful farmer must constantly familiarize himself. The largest amount given by any one State for Farmers' Institutes is appropriated by Wisconsin, the sum being $15,000. Other States give liberally, notably Minnesota, New York, and Ohio, while various sums are given by Pennsylvania, Michigan, Illinois, Ind
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Flower, Frank Abial 1854- (search)
Flower, Frank Abial 1854- Author; born in Cottage, N. Y., May 11, 1854; removed to Wisconsin. His publications include Old Abe, the Wisconsin War Eagle; Life of Matthew H. Carpenter; and a History of the Republican party.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fox Indians, (search)
Fox Indians, A tribe of Algonquian Indians first found by the whites in Wisconsin. They were driven south of the Wisconsin River by the Ojibwas and the French, and there incorporated with the Sac Indians. In 1900 there were 521 Sac and Fox of Mississippi at the Fox agency in Oklahoma; 77 Sac and Fox of Missouri at the Pottawatomie agency in Kansas, and 388 of the Sac and Fox of Mississippi at the Sac and Fox agency in Iowa.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gay, Picard du 1680- (search)
Gay, Picard du 1680- Explorer; born in France and lived in the seventeenth century; was with Michael Ako and Father Hennepin on an expedition to discover the sources of the Mississippi River. On April 11, 1680, they reached Wisconsin, and not long afterwards discovered the cataract which Hennepin named the Falls of St. Anthony. They remained in this district about three months, and then returned to Canada by the way of the St. Lawrence River.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...