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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
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ear us. We expected every moment that the enemy were going to open fire upon us, for we could plainly see him coming down the road towards us about half a mile off. We could also see, that when they came to a certain point they seemed to file to their left, which was our right, as we had formed in line. We supposed that they were aiming to turn our right, and General Blunt threw out skirmishers to discover their intentions. Our infantry, consisting of the Ninth and Twelfth regiments from Wisconsin, which had been put into four-mule Government wagons at Fort Scott, had just arrived, but it was now getting dark, and an approaching storm, together with our ignorance of the topographical condition of that section, made it impossible to commence an immediate attack. The rain came down in torrents, and it was soon intensely dark. We quickly discovered, however, that the road half a mile beyond the head of our column diverged, coming toward us, and that the enemy, instead of preparing t
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
spared from earth and heaven of that Iron Brigade, of Meredith's, on whose list appear such names as Lucius Fairchild, Henry Morrow, Rufus Dawes, and Samuel Williams, and such regiments as the g9th Indiana, 24th Michigan, and 2d, 6th, and 7th Wisconsin, which on the first day's front line with Buford and Reynolds, in that one fierce onset at Willoughby's Run, withstood overwhelming odds, with the loss of a thousand, a hundred and fifty-three of highest manliness; that of the 24th Michigan larerness and Spottsylvania lost a thousand one hundred and forty-three officers and men. Next, and out of like experiences, the brigades of Edwards and Hamblen, representing the valor of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. Now passes Getty's Division. Leading is Warner's Brigade, from its great record of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, and Cold Harbor; then the magnificent First Vermont Brigade, under that sterling soldier, General Lewis Grant; as their prou
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Resignation-private life-life at Galena-the coming crisis (search)
s material ones. We could not and ought not to be rigidly bound by the rules laid down under circumstances so different for emergencies so utterly unanticipated. The fathers themselves would have been the first to declare that their prerogatives were not irrevocable. They would surely have resisted secession could they have lived to see the shape it assumed. I travelled through the Northwest considerably during the winter of 1860-1. We had customers in all the little towns in south-west Wisconsin, south-east Minnesota and north-east Iowa. These generally knew I had been a captain in the regular army and had served through the Mexican war. Consequently wherever I stopped at night, some of the people would come to the public-house where I was, and sit till a late hour discussing the probabilities of the future. My own views at that time were like those officially expressed by Mr. [William H.] Seward at a later day, that the war would be over in ninety days. I continued to ent
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxxvi. (search)
Lxxvi. In August following the rebel raid, Judge J. T. Mills, of Wisconsin, in company with ex-Governor Randall, of that State, called upon the President at the Soldiers' home. Judge Mills subsequently published the following account of the interview, in the Grant County (Wisconsin) Herald :-- The Governor addressed him: Mr. President, this is my friend and your friend Mills, from Wisconsin. I am glad to see my friends from Wisconsin; they are the hearty friends of the Union. I could not leave the city, Mr. President, without hearing words of cheer from your own lips. Upon you, as the representative of the loyal people, depend, as we bWisconsin; they are the hearty friends of the Union. I could not leave the city, Mr. President, without hearing words of cheer from your own lips. Upon you, as the representative of the loyal people, depend, as we believe, the existence of our government and the future of America. Mr. President, said Governor Randall, why can't you seek seclusion, and play hermit for a fortnight? it would reinvigorate you. Aye, said the President, two or three weeks would do me good, but I cannot fly from my thoughts; my solicitude for this great cou
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Index. (search)
oon, 293; Lincoln and Willie Bladen, 294; you don't wear hoops, &c., 297; Grist illustration., 298; his duel, 302; interview with Judge Mills and ex-Gov. Randall, (Wis.,) 305; Lincoln and Rev. J. P. Gulliver, 309; shedding of blood, the remission of sins, 319; Lincoln and the drummer-boy, 319; consideration of the humble illustratan, 130, 113, 227, 255. McCulloch, Hon., Hugh, 179, 185. McKaye, Colonel, 208. McVeagh, 242. Memory, 52. Miller, Hon. S. F., 174. Mills, Judge J. T., ( Wis.,) 305. Mix, Captain, 261. Moody, Colonel, 102. Morgan, John, 259. Morgan, Senator, 74. Murtagh, Mr., (Washington,) 321. N. Nasby papers, 151. Newspa 318. Patterson, General, 137. Peace Conference at Hampton Roads, 209. Phelps, General, 273. Pierpont, Rev., John, 78, 179. R. Randall, ex-Governor, (Wis.,) 305. Raymond, 95, 129. Red River disaster, 55. Religious character, 185. Root General, 70. Root Hog Story, 211. S. Scott, General, 34. Seward
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, at Columbus Ohio, September, 1859. (search)
or rather a frame or draft of an ordinance for the government of this country, here in Ohio, our neighbors in Indiana, us who live in Illinois, our neighbors in Wisconsin and Michigan. In that ordinance, drawn up not only for the government of that Territory, but for the Territories south of the Ohio River, Mr. Jefferson expresslg with the original States. The same process in a few years was gone through with in Indiana, and so with Illinois, and the same substantially with Michigan and Wisconsin. Not only did that ordinance prevail, but it was constantly looked to whenever a step was taken by a new Territory to become a State. Congress always turned Begin with the men of the Revolution, and go down for sixty entire years, and until the last scrap of that Territory comes into the Union in the form of the State of Wisconsin-every thing was made to conform with the Ordinance of ‘87, excluding slavery from that vast extent of country. I omitted to mention in the right place t
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, at Cincinnati, Ohio, Oh September, 1859. (search)
there was something very important said about it by the same generation of men in the adoption of the old Ordinance of ‘87, through the influence of which you here in Ohio, our neighbors in Indiana, we in Illinois, our neighbors in Michigan and Wisconsin are happy, prosperous, teeming millions of free men. That generation of men, though not to the full extent members of the Convention that framed the Constitution, were to some extent members of that Convention, holding seats at the same time inng to do with making Indiana a free state, when we find some men chafing against and only restrained by that barrier. Come down again to our State of Illinois. The great North-west Territory, including Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin, was acquired first, I believe, by the British Government, in part at least, from the French. Before the establishment of our independence, it becomes a part of Virginia; enabling Virginia afterward to transfer it to the General Government. T
d him down in our country, where we need your help. Joshua R. Giddings wrote him words of encouragement. You may start, said the valiant old Abolitionist in a letter from Peoria, J. R. Giddings, Ms. letter, Sept. 18, 1855. on the one great issue of restoring Kansas and Nebraska to freedom, or rather of restoring the Missouri Compromise, and in this State no power on earth can withstand you on that issue. The demand for Lincoln was not confined to his own State. Indiana sent for him, Wisconsin, also, while Norman B. Judd and Ebenezer Peck, who were stumping Iowa, sent for him to come there. A town committee invited him to come during our Equestrian Fair on the 9th, 10th, and 11th, evidently anticipating a three days siege. An enthusiastic officer in a neighboring town urges him: Come to our place, because in you do our people place more confidence than in any other man. Men who do not read want the story told as you only can tell it. Others may make fine speeches, but it woul
Lincoln. The election was held on the 6th of November. The result showed a popular vote of 1,857,610 for Lincoln; 1,291,574 for Douglas; 850,022 for Breckenridge; and 646,124 for Bell. In the electoral college Lincoln received 180 votes, Breckenridge 72, Bell 39, and Douglas 12. Lincoln electors were chosen in seventeen of the free States, as follows: Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, California, Oregon; and in one State,--New Jersey,--owing to a fusion between Democrats, Lincoln secured four and Douglas three of the electors. Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia. Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North and South Carolina, and Texas went for Breckenridge; Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia for Bell; while Douglas secured only one entire State--Missouri. Mr. Lincoln having now been elected, there remained, before taking up the reins of governme
ort. A brief experience taught them he was not the man they bargained for. Next in importance to the attack on Fort Sumter, from a military standpoint, was the battle of Bull Run. How the President viewed it is best illustrated by an incident furnished by an old friend Robert L. Wilson, Ms., Feb. 10, 1866. who was an associate of his in the Legislature of Illinois, and who was in Washington when the engagement took place. The night after the battle, he relates, accompanied by two Wisconsin Congressmen, I called at the White House to get the news from Manassas, as it was then called, having failed in obtaining any information at Seward's office and elsewhere. Stragglers were coming with all sorts of wild rumors, but nothing more definite than that there had been a great engagement; and the bearer of each report had barely escaped with his life. Messengers bearing despatches to the President and Secretary of War were constantly arriving, but outsiders could gather nothing w
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