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azaine on to Paris a week in Meaux Rheims on the picket line under fire a surrender at Versailles General Burnside and Mr. Forbes in Paris. The Crown Prince having got to the bottom of his of Prussia was thus enabled to extend his left, without danger, as far as Bougival, north of Versailles, and eventually met the right of the Crown Prince of Saxony, already at Denil, north of St. De this, and seeing that the investment was about completed, I decided to take up my quarters at Versailles, and started for that place on the 22d, halting at Noisy le Grand to take luncheon with some auld have obtained food in plenty, and been perfectly secure from molestation. We arrived at Versailles about 7 o'clock that evening and settled ourselves in the Hotel Reservoir, happy to find there having kindly advised me as to the possible date, Forsyth and I, on the 14th of October, left Versailles, going first direct to the Chateau Ferrieres to pay our respects to the King, which we did, an
s of State deer shooting a Military dinner return to Versailles Germans entering Paris criticism on the Franco PrussiJules Favre and Count Bismarck in negotiations begun at Versailles the latter part of January. The convention was a large o enter into further negotiations with Count Bismarck at Versailles and arrange a peace, the terms of which, however, were t, it took but a few days to draw up and sign a treaty at Versailles, the principal negotiators being Thiers and Jules Favre mperor William (he had been proclaimed German Emperor at Versailles the 18th of January) did not accompany his troops into P. After the occupation of the city he still remained at Versailles, and as soon as circumstances would permit, I repaired t-bye. Besides the Emperor, the only persons I met at Versailles were General von Moltke and Bismarck. His Majesty was iior force at the vital point. After my brief trip to Versailles, I remained in Paris till the latter part of March. In
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Estaing, Charles Henry Theodat, Count Da, 1729- (search)
nvoy, a part of the way, the homeward-bound West Indiamen of the mercantile marine. During his absence a detachment from Martinique captured the English island of St. Vincent. Being largely reinforced soon afterwards, D'Estaing sailed with his whole fleet and conquered the island of Grenada. Before the conquest was quite completed Byron returned, when an indecisive engagement took place, and the much-damaged British fleet put into St. Christopher's. D'Estaing then sailed (August, 1779) to escort, part of the way, the homeward-bound French West Indiamen; and, returning, engaged jointly with the American army in the siege of Savannah, but abandoned the contest before a promised victory for the allies was won. He returned to France in 1780, and in 1783 he commanded the combined fleets of France and Spain, and was made a Spanish grandee. He favored the French Revolution, and commanded the National Guards at Versailles, but falling under the suspicion of the Terrorists, he was beheaded.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fersen, Axel, Count 1755- (search)
Fersen, Axel, Count 1755- Military officer; born in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1755; came to America on the staff of Rochambeau, fought under Lafayette, and received from Washington the Order of the Society of the Cincinnati. Returning to France, he became a favorite at court, and was the disguised coachman in the flight of the royal family from Versailles during the Revolution. He returned to Sweden, and was invested with dignities and honors, Axel Fersen. and in 1801 was made grand marshal of Sweden. On suspicion of complicity in the death of Prince Christian of Sweden, he was seized by a mob, while marshalling the funeral procession, and tortured to death, June 20, 1810.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Genest, or Genet, Edmond Charles 1765-1834 (search)
Genest, or Genet, Edmond Charles 1765-1834 Diplomatist; born in Versailles, France, Jan. 8, 1765. His literary talent was early developed. At the age of twelve years he received from the King of Edmond Charles Genest. Sweden a gold medal for a translation of the history of Eric XIV. into Swedish, with notes by himself. He was a brother of the celebrated Madame Campan, and was brought up in the French Court; yet he was a republican. Attached to the embassies of Berlin, Vienna, London, and St. Petersburg, he maintained his republican bias, and on his return from the Russian Court (1792) was appointed minister to the United States. He had already been made adjutant-general of the armies of France and minister to Holland by the revolutionists, and employed in revolutionizing Geneva and annexing it to France. He arrived at Charleston, S. C., April 9, 1793. He was received with open arms by the Republican, or Democratic, party. He was disposed to treat the United States gover
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Houdon, Jean Antoine 1740-1828 (search)
Houdon, Jean Antoine 1740-1828 Sculptor; born in Versailles, France, March 20. 1740; passed ten years at Rome in the study of the antiques. In 1785 he was employed to make a marble statue of Washington for the State of Virginia, which now stands in the rotunda of the State capitol at Richmond. He visited Mount Vernon and made a cast of the living face only, and. after returning to France, modelled the entire full length of the patriot. That original cast is at Mount Vernon It is the true model of Washington's face, and should be the standard portrait. He died in Paris, July 15, 1828. Houdon's mask of Washington.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lafayette, Marie Jean Paul Roch Yves Gilbert Motier, Marquis de 1757- (search)
ollows the account of his warm welcome at Paris.] Amidst the various tumultuous scenes that occupied my mind, I did not forget our revolution, of which the ultimate success still appeared uncertain. Accustomed to sec great interests supported by slender means. I often said to myself that the expense of one fete would have organized the army of the United States; and, to clothe that army, I would willingly, according to the expression of M. de Maurepas, have unfurnished the palace of Versailles. Eulogy by John Quincy Adams. On Dec. 31, 1834, ex-President Adams delivered the following oration on the life and services to America of Lafayette, in Washington, D. C.: On the 6th of September, 1757, Lafayette was born. The kings of France and Britain were seated upon their thrones by virtue of the principle of hereditary succession, variously modified and blended with different forms of religious faith, and they were waging war against each other, and exhausting the blood a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louis Xvi., King of France (search)
Louis Xvi., King of France Born in Versailles, Aug. 23, 1754; was a grandson of Louis XV. and of a daughter of Frederick Augustus, King of Poland and Elector of Saxony. His father dying in 1765, he became heir presumptive to the throne of France, which he ascended on May 10, 1774, with the beautiful Marie Antoinette, Archduchess of Austria, whom he married in May, 1770, as his Queen. Louis was amiable, fond of simple enjoyments, and was beloved by his people. Through bad advisers and the wickedness of demagogues, he was placed in seeming opposition to the people when his heart was really with them, and the madmen of France, who ruled the realm during the Reign of Terror, brought both Louis and his beautiful Queen to the scaffold. They went through the farce of a trial after Louis Xvi. arraigning the King on a charge of treason, found him guilty, of course, and beheaded him by the guillotine, with accompaniments of vulgar cruelty, in Paris, Jan. 21, 1793. His death was ser
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maurepas, Jean Frederic Phelypeaux, Count de 1701-1781 (search)
Maurepas, Jean Frederic Phelypeaux, Count de 1701-1781 Statesman; born in Versailles, France, July 9, 1701; was minister of state in 1738, and one of the ablest statesmen France ever produced; but because of an epigram on the mistress of Louis XV.—Madame d'etoiles—whom the monarch had just created Marquise de Pompadour, he was removed from office in 1745. He was recalled in 1774, on the accession of Louis XVI., when he restored the exiled Parliament, and began a system of reform. He was i 1738, and one of the ablest statesmen France ever produced; but because of an epigram on the mistress of Louis XV.—Madame d'etoiles—whom the monarch had just created Marquise de Pompadour, he was removed from office in 1745. He was recalled in 1774, on the accession of Louis XVI., when he restored the exiled Parliament, and began a system of reform. He was instrumental in bringing about the treaty of alliance between France and the United States in 1778. He died in Versailles, Nov. 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Socialism, (search)
ishes his work, The theory of the four movements and the General destinies1808 Zoarites settle in Ohio1817 Robert Owen advocates a socialistic community before the English House of Commons' committee on the poor-law1817 Count C. H. de Saint-Simon, founder of French socialism, author of Nouveau Christianisme, and other socialistic works, born 1760, died1825 Constitution of the New harmony community of equality, signedJan. 12, 1826 Unsuccessful trial of Fourierism made on an estate near Versailles; only one during the lifetime of Fourier1832 Louis Blanc, French (1813-82), publishes his Organization of labor in the Revue du Progres1840 Pierre Joseph Proudhon publishes his work, What is property? affirming, Property is theft 1840 Albert Brisbane publishes his Social destiny of man1840 Karl Rodbertus, German (1805-75), publishes his book, Our economic condition1842 Christian Metz establishes a community at Ebenezer, N. Y.1842 A column in the New York Tribune edited by Albert Bri
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