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The Daily Dispatch: December 9, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 2 0 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
hn's Run, W. Va., September, 1863. Duty there and at Springfield till December. Scout in Hampshire, Hardy, Frederick and Shenandoah Counties December 7-11 (Detachment). Regiment moved to Har. Moved to Martinsburg, and duty there till December 20. At New Creek and duty in Hardy, Hampshire and Pendleton Counties till June, 1865. Scout to Greenland Gap and Franklin January 11-15, upon Salem, Va., December 16. Jackson River, near Covington, December 19. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties, W. Va., December 31, 1863-January 5, 1864, and January 27-February 5. Mescent upon Salem December 16. Jackson River, near Covington, December 19. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties December 31, 1863-January 5, 1864. Medley January 29-30. Evacuation o Jackson River, near Covington, December 19. Petersburg January 10, 1864. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties January 27-February 7. Moorefield February 4. Consolidated with Ringg
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
ington, D. C., February 6, and duty there and in District of Alexandria till January 6, 1864. Duty near Martinsburg, W. Va., till January 27. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy counties, W. Va., January 27-February 7. Duty near Kearneysville, W. Va., till March 27, and near Harper's Ferry till April 3. Moved to Webster, on, D. C., February 6, and duty there and in the District of Alexandria till January 6, 1864. Duty near Martinsburg, W. Va., till January 27. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy counties January 27-February 7. Duty near Kearneysville till March 27. Moved to Webster, thence to the Kanawha Valley April 22. Crook's ExpediMulligan at Petersburg, W. Va., August 1-5, and duty there till November 7. Moved to Springfield, thence to Cumberland, Md., January 4, 1864. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties January 26-February 7. Patterson Creek February 3 (Co. F ). Fremont's Ford April 1. Little Cacapon April 10 (Co. K ). Sigel's Ex
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, West Virginia Volunteers. (search)
alt Lick Bridge October 11 and 14, 1863. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties January 27 to February 7, 1864. Actartinsburg, W. Va., till March 19, 1864. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties January 27-February 7. Springfield t Martinsburg, W. Va., till March, 1864. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties January 27-February 7. Springfield st 31. At New Creek till April, 1864. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties against Rosser January 27-February 7, kson River, near Covington, December 19. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties against Rosser January 27-February 7, rsburg to New Creek January 10-12, 1864. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties against Rosser January 27-February 7. kson River, near Covington, December 19. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties December 31, 1863-January 5, 1864. Operations in Hampshire and Hardy Counties against Rosser January 27-February 7, 1864. Evacuation of Petersburg January 30
g increased to eighty by forty-four feet, three stories high. The plant was furnished with the latest improved machinery; the concern now employs from seventy-five to one hundred hands, and makes a specialty of chocolates, bonbons, and caramels. H. F. Sparrow, manufacturer of fine chocolates, bonbons, and caramels, began business in 1887, in a two-story building on Windsor Street; the growth of the business compelled larger quarters, and in 1891 the present factory, on the corner of Hampshire and Clark streets, was erected. The building measures one hundred and ten by forty-five feet, and has four stories and basement. By close attention to business a large trade over the United States has been secured; in the busy season one hundred and seventy-five hands are employed. The Bay State confectionery Co. are the successors of J. S. Bell & Co., who first engaged in manufacturing confectionery in a small building on Pearl Street, in May, 1890, moving into their present quart
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
being,—for me to abandon their cause, come what may to my person or reputation, would be base in the extreme. It is my exalted privilege to be one of their advocates, and I want no other. Mrs. Chapman was delighted to hear about our movements in England, and particularly all we had to say about yourself. She is as buoyant and active in spirit as ever, and, if possible, even more arduous in her labors. Noble woman! There is to be a State Anti-Slavery Convention in New Lib. 10.151. Hampshire next week, and another in Massachusetts during this month, at both of which Rogers and myself are expected to be present, to give an account of that which never existed —to wit, the World's Convention. We shall show it up in its true light, London Committee and all! And now for a specimen of American orthodox Quakerism, as it relates to prejudice against a colored complexion. Perhaps our mutual friend William Bassett has sent it to you already: if so, you will excuse the repetition.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
right of universal suffrage for men, forgetting that there were other immortal and responsible agents in the world, the women! But he dared not add woman's rights as the 20th point to his 19—that would have lost numbers, the prime aim of parties.) It was prophesied that the party would be obliged to desert its main principle, separate organization, in any real anti-slavery struggle. It did so in the only two it has met—in New York, on the Constitution; in New N. Y. Constitution of 1846. Hampshire, on J. P. Hale's election. On Aug. 6, 1846, Gerrit Smith wrote: Since the Liberty Party has subscribed to the doctrine of voting for pro-slavery men, I have no desire to attend its meetings. Until the last nine months, I had taken it for granted that not to vote for a pro-slavery man was a settled, immovable, never, no never-to-be-departed — from doctrine of the Liberty Party. But I learned my mistake when I found that most of the members of the Liberty Party in this State, and most o<
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Eminent women of the drama. (search)
ffection not less than esteem. At the close of their engagement here, Mr. and Mrs. Kean returned to England, there to commence a series of farewell performances, by way of final retirement from public life. This was abruptly terminated by the sudden and serious illness of Mr. Kean, on the 29th of May, 1867, when, at Liverpool, he was playing Louis XI. He never played again. On the 22d of January, 1868, at Bayswater, near London, he died. His grave is in the village of Catherington, in Hampshire, close by that of his mother. Ellen Tree, of course, will act no more. Sorrow saddens the autumn of her brilliant life. From all quarters, though, she is the recipient of the kindest and sincerest sympathy. The Queen of England, herself a widow, has sent a letter of condolence to the widow of the actor. Better than royal courtesy, however, and better than all the consolations of friendship and fortune, is the consciousness of duty well and truly done toward him whom she loves and mour
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 12: Whittier the poet (search)
ut came very near it. As for his rhymes, though not so bad as those of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, they were, in his early years, bad enough. Mr. Linton, from the English point of view, or from any other, was justified in protesting against such rhymes as worn and turn, joins and pines, faults and revolts, flood and Hood, even and Devon, heaven and forgiven. Linton's Whittier, p. 167. We can easily find in addition, mateless and greatness, pearl and marl, women and trimming, scamper and Hampshire; some of all this list, it must be remembered, being mere archaisms or localisms, and all tending in Whittier's case, as in Mrs. Browning's, to entire disappearance after middle life. No one complains of the rhymes in Sonnets from the Portuguese. Even when Whittier uses a mispronunciation or makes a slip in grammar, it has the effect of oversight or of whim, rather than of ignorance. Thus he commonly accents the word romance on the first syllable, as in- Young Romance raised his dr
eet, easterly by the marsh, southerly by School Street and westerly by a line passing through the centre of the Brick Meeting-house lot, nearly parallel with Columbia Street. About 1782 he removed to Tewksbury, but returned about 1796, and resided several years in the house on Plymouth Street, recently destroyed, familiarly known as the Cholera House, having sold the homestead, in 1794, to the Corporation of Harvard College. In 1805 he erected the house now standing at the S. W. corner of Hampshire and Windsor streets, where he subsequently resided. When the great speculations in land commenced, about 1802, he sold large portions of his estate, united with others in laying out streets for a great city, and gave to the Town the school-house lot at the corner of Windsor and School streets, and to the proprietors of the Brick Meeting-house the easterly half of the square on which that house stood. He was Town Clerk, 1769-1780, and Town Treasurer, 1777, 1778. It is remarkable, that th
eet, easterly by the marsh, southerly by School Street and westerly by a line passing through the centre of the Brick Meeting-house lot, nearly parallel with Columbia Street. About 1782 he removed to Tewksbury, but returned about 1796, and resided several years in the house on Plymouth Street, recently destroyed, familiarly known as the Cholera House, having sold the homestead, in 1794, to the Corporation of Harvard College. In 1805 he erected the house now standing at the S. W. corner of Hampshire and Windsor streets, where he subsequently resided. When the great speculations in land commenced, about 1802, he sold large portions of his estate, united with others in laying out streets for a great city, and gave to the Town the school-house lot at the corner of Windsor and School streets, and to the proprietors of the Brick Meeting-house the easterly half of the square on which that house stood. He was Town Clerk, 1769-1780, and Town Treasurer, 1777, 1778. It is remarkable, that th
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