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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 7 5 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 6 0 Browse Search
The Venerable Bede, Historiam ecclesiasticam gentis Anglorum (ed. Charles Plummer) 6 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 2 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 1 1 Browse Search
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C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 5, chapter 13 (search)
The island is triangular in its form, and one of its sides is opposite to Gaul. One angle of this side, which is in Kent , whither almost all ships from Gaul are directed, [looks] to the east; the lower looks to the south. This side extends about 500 miles. Another side lies toward Spain and the west, on which part is Ireland , less, as is reckoned, than Britain, by one half: but the passage [from it] into Britain is of equal distance with that from Gaul. In the middle of this voyage, is an island, which is called Mona: many smaller islands besides are supposed to lie [there], of which islands some have written that at the time of the winter solstice it is night there for thirty consecutive days. We, in our inquiries about that matter, ascertained
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 5, chapter 14 (search)
The most civilized of all these nations are they who inhabit Kent , which is entirely a maritime district, nor do they differ much from the Gallic customs. Most of the inland inhabitants do not sow corn, but live on milk and flesh, and are clad with skins. All the Britains, indeed, dye themselves with wood, which occasions a bluish color, and thereby have a more terrible appearance in fight. They wear their hair long, and have every part of their body shaved except their head and upper lip. Ten and even twelve have wives common to them, and particularly brothers among brothers, and parents among their children; but if there be any issue by these wives, they are reputed to be the children of those by whom respectively each was first espoused when a virgin.
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 5, chapter 22 (search)
While these things are going forward in those places, Cassivellaunus sends messengers into Kent , which, we have observed above, is on the sea, over which districts four several kings reigned, Cingetorix, Carvilius, Taximagulus and Segonax, and commands them to collect all their forces, and unexpectedly assail and storm the naval camp. When they had come to the camp, our men, after making a sally, slaying many of their men, and also capturing a distinguished leader named Lugotorix, brought back their own men in safety. Cassivellaunus, when this battle was reported to him as so many losses had been sustained, and his territories laid waste, being alarmed most of all by the desertion of the states, sends embassadors to Caesar [to treat] about a
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 6, line 1 (search)
Or had done anything most hard, to mould The world's created surface. Here the war Was prisoned: blood predestinate to flow In all the parts of earth; the host foredoomed To fall in Libya or in Thessaly Was here: in such small amphitheatre The tide of civil passion rose and fell. At first Pompeius knew not: so the hind Who peaceful tills the mid-Sicilian fields Hears not Pelorus C. del Faro, the N.E. point of Sicily. sounding to the storm; So billows thunder on Rutupian shores,The shores of Kent. Unheard by distant Caledonia's tribes. But when he saw the mighty barrier stretch O'er hill and valley, and enclose the land, He bade his columns leave their rocky hold And seize on posts of vantage in the plain; Thus forcing Caesar to extend his troops On wider lines; and holding for his own Such space encompassed as divides from Rome Aricia,Aricia was situated on the Via Appia, about sixteen miles from Rome. There was a temple of Diana close to it, among some woods on a small lake. Aricia
The Venerable Bede, Historiam ecclesiasticam gentis Anglorum (ed. Charles Plummer), LIBER PRIMUS., XXV. (search)
XXV. Ut ueniens Brittaniam Augustinus primo in insula Tanato regi Cantuariorum praedicarit; et sic accepta ab eo licentia, Cantiam praedicaturus intrauerit. Augustine lands in Kent, A. D. 597. ROBORATUS ergo confirmatione beati patris Gregorii, Augustinus cum famulis Christi, qui erant cum eo, rediit in opus uerbi, peruenitque Brittaniam. Erat eo tempore rex Aedilberct in Cantia potentissimus, qui ad confinium usque Humbrae fluminis maximi, quo meridiani et septentrionales Anglorum populi diratitudinis circiter trium stadiorum, et duobus tantum in locis est transmeabilis; utrumque enim caput protendit in mare. In hac ergo adplicuit seruus Domini Augustinus, et socii eius, uiri, ut ferunt, ferme XL. Acceperunt Reception by Ethelbert of Kent. autem, praecipiente beato papa Gregorio, de gente Francorum interpretes; et mittens ad Aedilberctum mandauit se uenisse de Roma, ac nuntium ferre optimum, qui sibi obtemperantibus aeterna in caelis gaudia, et regnum sine fine cum Deo uiuo et uer
The Venerable Bede, Historiam ecclesiasticam gentis Anglorum (ed. Charles Plummer), LIBER SECUNDUS., V. (search)
, qualiter id emendare deberet, qui aliquid rerum uel ecclesiae, uel episcopi, uel reliquorum ordinum furto auferret; uolens scilicet tuitionem eis, quos et quorum doctrinam susceperat, praestare. His descent. Erat autem idem Aedilberct filius Irminrici, cuius pater Octa, cuius pater Oeric cognomento Oisc, a quo reges Cantuariorum solent Oiscingas cognominare. Cuius pater Hengist, qui cum filio suo Oisc inuitatus a Uurtigerno Brittaniam primus intrauit, ut supra retulimus. Pagan reaction in Kent, At uero post mortem Aedilbercti, cum filius eius Eadbald regni gubernacula suscepisset, magno tenellis ibi adhuc ecclesiae crementis detrimento fuit. Siquidem non solum fidem Christi recipere noluerat, sed et fornicatione pollutus est tali, qualem nec inter gentes auditam apostolus testatur, ita ut uxorem patris haberet. 1 Cor. v. 1. Quo utroque scelere occasionem dedit ad priorem uomitum reuertendi his, qui sub imperio sui parentis, cf. Prov. xxvi. 11; 2 Pet. ii. 22. uel fauore uel timore r
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe discourse of the voyage of Sir Jerome Bowes knight, her Majesties ambassadour to Ivan Vasilivich the Emperour of Muscovia, in the yeere 1583. (search)
terwards happily (though hardly) recovered his ship in safetie, although presently afterwards, there was great hurly burly after him, to force him to receive the same againe, but failed of their purpose. So came the ambassadour from S. Nicholas the twelft day of August, and arrived at Gravesend the twelft of September following, and attended her Majestie at the court at Otelands, where, after having kist her Majesties hands, and delivered some part of the successe of his ambassage, he presented her an Elke or Loshe, the Red deere of the countrey, and also a brace of Raine deare, Buck and Doe, both bearing very huge homes: they in her Majesties presence drew a sled and a man upon it, after the maner of the Samoeds, a people that inhabite in the Northeast from Russia , and were that yeere come over the sea in the winter season upon the yce, in their sleds, drawen with these deere into Russia , where the ambassadour bought of them seventeene, whereof he brought nine alive into Kent .
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, These following he obteined for the behoofe of the merchants. (search)
terwards happily (though hardly) recovered his ship in safetie, although presently afterwards, there was great hurly burly after him, to force him to receive the same againe, but failed of their purpose. So came the ambassadour from S. Nicholas the twelft day of August, and arrived at Gravesend the twelft of September following, and attended her Majestie at the court at Otelands, where, after having kist her Majesties hands, and delivered some part of the successe of his ambassage, he presented her an Elke or Loshe, the Red deere of the countrey, and also a brace of Raine deare, Buck and Doe, both bearing very huge homes: they in her Majesties presence drew a sled and a man upon it, after the maner of the Samoeds, a people that inhabite in the Northeast from Russia , and were that yeere come over the sea in the winter season upon the yce, in their sleds, drawen with these deere into Russia , where the ambassadour bought of them seventeene, whereof he brought nine alive into Kent .
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Henrie Lane to the worshipfull M. William Sanderson, conteining a briefe discourse of that which passed in the Northeast discovery for the space of three and thirtie yeres. (search)
overed the companies (called the olde companies) great losse, charges, and damages: but the saying is true, By unitie small things grow great, & by contention great things become small. This may be understood best by the company. The frowardnesse of some few, and evill doing of some unjust factors, was cause of much of the evill successe. Arthur Edwards was sent againe 1579. and died in the voyage at Astracan. About which matters, are to be remembred the voyages of Master Thomas Randolph Esquire, Ambassador, anno 1567. And late of Sir Jerome Bowes, anno 1583. both tending and treating for further discoveries, freedomes, and privileges, wherewith I meddle not. But in conclusion, for their paines and adventures this way (as divers do now adayes other wayes) as worthy Gentlemen sent from princes, to doe their countrey good, I put them in your memorie, with my hearty farewell. From S. Magarets neere Dartforth in Kent . Yours Henry Lane.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages of the English Nation to Newfoundland , to the Isles of Ramea, and the Isles of Assumption otherwise called Natiscotec, situate at the mouth of the River of Canada, and to the coastes of Cape Briton, and Arambec, corruptly called Norumbega, with the Patents, letters, and advertisements thereunto belonging. (search)
etched foorth in the ende of a pole, I make as it were an Eele speare, with which I pricke those Flounders as fast as you would take up fritters with a sharpe pointed sticke, and with that toole I may take up in lesse then halfe a day Lobsters sufficient to finde three hundred men for a dayes meate. This pastime ended, I shewe them that for my pleasure I take a great Mastive I have, and say no more then thus: Goe fetch me this rebellious fish that obeyeth not this Gentleman that commeth from Kent and Christendome, bringing them to the high water marke, and when hee doubteth that any of those great Cods by reason of shelving ground bee like to tumble into the Sea againe, hee will warily take heede and carrie him up backe to the heape of his fellowes. This doeth cause my friendes to wonder, and at the first hearing to judge them notorious lies, but they laugh and are merrie when they heare the meanes howe each tale is true. I tolde you once I doe remember how in my travaile into Afr
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