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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
ber 1568.NOT untruely nor without cause said Job the faithfull servant of God (whom the sacred Scriptures tell us, to have dwelt in the land of Hus) that man being borne of a woman, living a short time, is replenished with many miseries: which some know by reading of histories, many by the view of others calamities, and I by experience in my selfe, as this present Treatise insuing shall shew. It is not unknowen unto many, that I Job Hortop pouder-maker was borne at Bourne , a towne in Lincolnshire , from my age of twelve yeeres brought up in Redriffe neere London , with M. Francis Lee, who was the Queenes Majesties powder-maker, whom I served, until I was prest to go on the 3. voyage to the West Indies, with the right worshipful Sir John Hawkins, who appointed me to be one of the Gunners in her Majesties ship called the Jesus of Lubeck, who set saile from Plimmouth in the moneth of October 567. having with him another ship of her Majesties, called the Minion, and foure ships of his
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The travailes of Job Hortop, which Sir John Hawkins set on land within the Bay of Mexico, after his departure from the Haven of S. John de Ullua in Nueva Espanna, the 8. of October 1568. (search)
ber 1568.NOT untruely nor without cause said Job the faithfull servant of God (whom the sacred Scriptures tell us, to have dwelt in the land of Hus) that man being borne of a woman, living a short time, is replenished with many miseries: which some know by reading of histories, many by the view of others calamities, and I by experience in my selfe, as this present Treatise insuing shall shew. It is not unknowen unto many, that I Job Hortop pouder-maker was borne at Bourne , a towne in Lincolnshire , from my age of twelve yeeres brought up in Redriffe neere London , with M. Francis Lee, who was the Queenes Majesties powder-maker, whom I served, until I was prest to go on the 3. voyage to the West Indies, with the right worshipful Sir John Hawkins, who appointed me to be one of the Gunners in her Majesties ship called the Jesus of Lubeck, who set saile from Plimmouth in the moneth of October 567. having with him another ship of her Majesties, called the Minion, and foure ships of his
acts are as follows:-- To the Right Honorable, my very good Lady, the Lady Bridget, Countess of Lincoln. Madam,--Touching the plantation, which we here have begun, it fell out thus: About the year 1627, some friends, being together in Lincolnshire, fell into discourse about New England and the planting of the gospel there; and, after some deliberation, we imparted our reasons by letters and messages to some in London and the West Country, where it was likewise deliberately thought upon,t exploration of the river, carried probably as far as Medford lines; and the English eyes in that boat were the first eyes of settlers that looked upon these fields on which we now live. The first settlers came from Suffolk, Essex, and Lincolnshire, in England. The first grant made by the Court of Assistants of lands in Mistick was made to Governor Winthrop in 1631. The record says: Six hundred acres of land, to be set forth by metes and bounds, near his house in Mistick, to enjoy to him a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
hs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder particularly named. 4; Cambridge University, 2; Cambridge Town, 2. Essex, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Colchester, 11; Colchester, 2. Suffolk, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereafter named, 10; Ipswich, 2; St. Edmund's Bury, 1. Norfolk, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 9; Norwich, 3; Lynn, 1; Yarmouth, 1. Lincolnshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except the City of Lincoln and the Town of Boston, 11; Lincoln. 1; Boston, 1. Rutlandshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 1. Huntingdonshire. with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 3. Leichestershire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Leicester, 5; Leicester, 1. Nottinghamshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Nottingham. 4: Nottingham, 1. Derbyshire, wit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boston, (search)
s respects to Governor Winthrop, and informed him that upon Shawmut was a spring of excellent water. He invited Winthrop to come over. The governor, with others, crossed the river, and finding the situation there delightful, began a settlement by the erection of a few small cottages. At a court held at Charlestown in September. 1630, it was ordered that Tri-mountain should be called Boston. This name was given in honor of Rev. John Cotton. vicar of St. Botolph's Church at Boston, in Lincolnshire. England, from which place many of the settlers came. The governor, with most of his assistants, remove(d their families to Boston, and it soon became the capital of New England. In August. 1632, the inhabitants of Charlestown and Boston began the erection of a church edifice at the latter place. There were then 151 church-members at the two settlements. They amicably divided, the church in Boston retaining Mr. Wilson as its pastor, and that in Charlestown invited Rev. Thomas James t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bradstreet, Simon, -1697 (search)
Bradstreet, Simon, -1697 Colonial governor: horn in Lincolnshire, England, in March, 1603. After studying one year in college, he became steward to the Countess of Warwick. He married Anne, a daughter of Thomas Dudley, and was persuaded to engage in the settlement of Massachusetts. Invested with the office of judge, he arrived at Salem in the summer of 1630. The next year he was among the founders of Cambridge, and was one of the first settlers at Andover. Very active, he was almost continually in public life, and lived at Salem, Ipswich, and Boston. He was secretary, agent, and commissioner of the United Colonies of New England; and in 1662 he was despatched to congratulate Charles II. on his restoration. He was assistant from 1630 to 1679, and deputy-governor from 1673 to 1679. From that time till 1686 (when the charter was annulled) he was governor. When, in 1689. Andros was imprisoned, he was restored to the office, which he held until the arrival of Governor Phip
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brewster, William, 1560-1644 (search)
the office of postmaster at Scrooby. When his mind was turned very seriously towards religious subjects, he withdrew from the Church of England, and established a dissenting society, or rather a society of Separatists. This new society worshipped on Sabbath days at Mr. Brewster's house until persecution began to interrupt them. He, with Mr. Bradford and others, was among those who attempted to fly to Holland in 1607. (See Robinson, John.) They were arrested and imprisoned at Boston in Lincolnshire. As Mr. Brewster had the most property, he was the greater sufferer. At much expense he gained his liberty, and then he assisted the poorer members of the church to escape, following them himself soon afterwards. At Leyden he opened a school for teaching the English language, to replenish his exhausted funds, He had then been an elder and teacher for some time. By the assistance of some friends he procured a printing-press, and published several books against the English hierarchy. I
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Coddington, William 1601- (search)
Coddington, William 1601- Founder of Rhode Island; born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1601; came to America in 1630 as a magistrate of Massachusetts appointed by the crown. He was a prosperous merchant in Boston, but, taking the part of Anne Hutchinson (q. v.), he was so persecuted that, with eighteen others, he removed to the island of Aquidneck (now Rhode Island), where, on the organization of a government, he was appointed judge, or chief ruler. In March, 1640, Coddington was elected governor, and held the office seven years. He went to England in 1651, and in 1674-75 he was again governor. He adopted the tenets of the Quakers. He died Nov. 1, 1678.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cotton, John 1585-1652 (search)
Cotton, John 1585-1652 Clergyman; born in Derby, England, Dec. 4, 1585; became minister of St. Botolph's Church, Boston, Lincolnshire, about 1612, and remained there, a noted preacher and controversialist, for twenty years, constantly leaning towards Puritanism. For his non-conformity he was cited to appear before Archbishop Laud, when he fled to America, arriving in Boston in September, 1633. He was soon afterwards ordained a colleague with Mr. Wilson in the Boston Church. His ministry there for nineteen years was so influential that he has been called The patriarch of New England. He was a firm opponent of Roger Williams, and defended the authority of ministers and magistrates. He and Davenport were invited to assist in the assembly of divines at Westminster, but were dissuaded from going by Hooker. He died in Boston, Dec. 23, 1652. God's promise to his plantations.— The following sermon, to which a large historical importance has been given, was preached in England, a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dawson, Henry Barton, 1821- (search)
Dawson, Henry Barton, 1821- Author; born in Lincolnshire, England, June 8, 1821; came to New York with his parents in 1834. He is the author of Battles of the United States by sea and land; Recollections of the Jersey prison-ship; Westchester county in the Revolution, etc. For many years he was editor of the Historical magazine.
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