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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Letters concerning the voyage of M. John Newbery and M. Ralph Fitch, made by the way of the Levant Sea to Syria , and overland to Balsara, and thence into the East Indies, and beyond, In the yeere 1583. (search)
rotted in prison. The archbishop is a very good man, who hath two yong men to his servantes, the one of them was borne at Hamborough, and is called Bernard Borgers: and the other was borne at Enchuysen, whose name is John Linscot, who did us great pleasure: for by them the archbishop was many times put in minde of us. And the two good fathers of S. Paul, who travelled very much for us, the one of them is called Padre Marke, who was borne in Bruges in Flanders, and the other was borne in Wiltshire in England, and is called Padre Thomas Stevens. Also I chanced to finde here a young man, who was borne in Antwerpe, but the most part of his bringing up hath beene in London, his name is Francis de Rea, and with him it was my hap to be acquainted in Aleppo, who also hath done me great pleasure here. In the prison at Ormus we remained many dayes, also we lay a long time at sea comming hither, and forthwith at our arrivall here were carried to prison, and the next day after were sent
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, His third Letter to Maister Leonard Poore, written from Goa. (search)
rotted in prison. The archbishop is a very good man, who hath two yong men to his servantes, the one of them was borne at Hamborough, and is called Bernard Borgers: and the other was borne at Enchuysen, whose name is John Linscot, who did us great pleasure: for by them the archbishop was many times put in minde of us. And the two good fathers of S. Paul, who travelled very much for us, the one of them is called Padre Marke, who was borne in Bruges in Flanders, and the other was borne in Wiltshire in England, and is called Padre Thomas Stevens. Also I chanced to finde here a young man, who was borne in Antwerpe, but the most part of his bringing up hath beene in London, his name is Francis de Rea, and with him it was my hap to be acquainted in Aleppo, who also hath done me great pleasure here. In the prison at Ormus we remained many dayes, also we lay a long time at sea comming hither, and forthwith at our arrivall here were carried to prison, and the next day after were sent
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 12.91 (search)
photograph taken in England after the loss of his ship. our Acting Master, I. D. Bulloch, of Georgia, was a younger brother of Captain James D. Bulloch. A few months' active service gave confidence to the watch-officers of the ward-room, and it may safely be affirmed that older heads could not have filled their places with greater efficiency. The remainder of our ward-room mess was made up of our surgeon, Dr. F. L. Galt, of Virginia, also of the old service; Dr. D. H. Llewellyn, of Wiltshire, England, who, as surgeon, came out in the ship when under English colors, and joined us as assistant surgeon. First Lieutenant B. K. Howell, of the Marine Corps, brother-in-law of President Davis, was from Mississippi, and Mr. Miles J. Freeman, our chief engineer, had been with us in the Sumter. The steerage mess was made up of three midshipmen — E. M. Anderson, of Georgia; E. A. Maffitt, of North Carolina, son of the captain of the Confederate States steamer Florida; and George T. Sinclair,
ed and wounded, is 30, to wit: 9 killed, and 21 wounded. It was afterward ascertained, that as many as ten were drowned. As stated in the above despatch, I had the satisfaction of saving all my wounded men. Every one of them was passed carefully into a boat, and sent off to the enemy's ship, before the final plunge into the sea was made by the unhurt portion of the crew. Here is the proper place to drop a tear over the fate of a brave officer. My surgeon, D. II. Llewellyn, of Wiltshire, England, a grandson of Lord Herbert, lost his life by drowning. It was his privilege to accompany the wounded men, in the boats, to the Kearsarge, but he did not do so. He remained and took his chance of escape, with the rest of his brethren in arms, and perished almost in sight of his home, after an absence of two years from the dear ones who were to mourn his loss. With reference to the drowning of my men, I desire to present a contrast to the reader. I sank the Hatteras off Galveston, in
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Georgia. (search)
wns. These regiments of coloured troops, commanded by strangers and adventurers, are the cause of much distrust. Some scalawag whispers that General Grant desires to see the Negro uppermost in the State, his hands in White men's pockets, and his heels on White men's necks. The Negroes and Mulattoes think these scalawags speak the truth. Poor things! they cannot read and write. As children they were slaves. Of politics and history they know less than the most stupid Suabian boor or Wiltshire clown. Of moral codes and social sciences they have hardly an idea; but the poorest African in Georgia can see the difference between a cabin and a house, a full table and an empty one, a warm coat and a cotton rag, a place in the gutter and a seat in the legislative hall. Look, cry the scalawags, at Louisiana and Mississippi! There you have Negro sheriffs and assessors, judges and legislators. In New Orleans and Jackson you have Negro Senators, Negro Lieutenant-governors, and Federal
s afterwards sold to Samuel Shepard. He removed, probably in 1636, to Connecticut, of which colony he was Treasurer in 1637, and was an Elder of the church in Weathersfield. Chauncy, Rev. Charles, s. of George Chauncy of Hertfordshire, England, bap. at Yardley 5 Nov. 1592, came to New England 1638, and after preaching at Plymouth and Scituate, became President of Harvard College 27 Nov. 1654, in which office he d. 19 Feb. 1671-2. His w. was Catherine, dau. of Robert Eyre, Esq., of Wiltshire, England, and d. in Camb. 24 Jan. 1667-8. Their children (all born before the parents removed to Camb.), were Isaac, b. 23 Aug. 1632, grad. H. C. 1651, went to England, preached until the reign of Charles II., when he was ejected, and afterwards resided in London, until his death, 28 Feb. 1711-12; Ichabod, b. 1635, grad. H. C. 1651, went to England, preached, and afterwards practised medicine, and d. at Bristol 25 July 1691; Barnabas, grad. H. C. 1657; Nathaniel, grad. H. C. 1661, ministe
s afterwards sold to Samuel Shepard. He removed, probably in 1636, to Connecticut, of which colony he was Treasurer in 1637, and was an Elder of the church in Weathersfield. Chauncy, Rev. Charles, s. of George Chauncy of Hertfordshire, England, bap. at Yardley 5 Nov. 1592, came to New England 1638, and after preaching at Plymouth and Scituate, became President of Harvard College 27 Nov. 1654, in which office he d. 19 Feb. 1671-2. His w. was Catherine, dau. of Robert Eyre, Esq., of Wiltshire, England, and d. in Camb. 24 Jan. 1667-8. Their children (all born before the parents removed to Camb.), were Isaac, b. 23 Aug. 1632, grad. H. C. 1651, went to England, preached until the reign of Charles II., when he was ejected, and afterwards resided in London, until his death, 28 Feb. 1711-12; Ichabod, b. 1635, grad. H. C. 1651, went to England, preached, and afterwards practised medicine, and d. at Bristol 25 July 1691; Barnabas, grad. H. C. 1657; Nathaniel, grad. H. C. 1661, ministe
r., 93. Whittemore, Anna, 87. Whittemore, Jabez, 15. Whittemore, John, 87, 89. Whittemore, Joseph, Jr., 82. Whittemore, Captain, Samuel, 18. Whittemore, Sarah (Hall), 87. Whittemore. William, 19, 22. Whittier, John Greenleaf, 11. Whittredge, Mrs., 47. Wigglesworth, Rev., Michael, 88. Wilkins, J. M., 92. Wilkins, J. M. K., 72, 73. Willis Creek, 4. Willis, Grace, 86. Willoughby, 6. Wilson, Jeremy, 99. Wilson, Sergeant-Major, 50. Wilson, Captain, William. 87. Wiltshire, Eng., 77, 78, 81. Winter Hill, 6, 7, 18, 70, 72, 74, 85, 91, 96, 99. Winter Hill Road, 6, 9S, 93, 100. Winthrop, Governor, 23. Winthrop, Mr., 80. Woburn. 14, 20, 81. Wood, David, 21. Wood, Hepzibah (Billings), 88. Wood, John, 88. Wood, Deacon, John, 88. Wood, Joseph, 88. Wood, Mary (Blaney), 88. Woodstock, Vt., 1. Worcester, Eng., 77. Worcester County, Mass., 85. Wright, Timothy, 41. Wyman, 14, 38, 64, 65. Wyman. Charles, 92, 94. Wyman, Elizabeth, 20. Wyman, He