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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 24 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Orleans (France) or search for Orleans (France) in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 10: the voyage and Arrival.—December, 1837, to January, 1838— age, 26-27. (search)
ntal effigy; of William of the Long Sword, his son; of Henry, the father of Coeur de Lion; and here the Lion-heart itself was deposited. At a later day, the remains of the Duke of Bedford—the English regent of France, discomfited by the Maid of Orleans—were deposited here; and an inscription behind the great altar marks the spot. Different parts, in the neighborhood of altars, are occupied by inscriptions and engraved effigies of bishops, archbishops, cardinals, and other eminent men, whose smy means of getting correct information were so small, and my time so limited, that I passed to other objects, which possessed an interest into which I could more readily enter. Particularly among these was the market-place in which the Maid of Orleans was burnt; Place de la Pucelle. and a building which the Duke of Bedford was said to have occupied, and which had a beautiful relievo on its wall of the meeting of Francis and Henry at the Field of the Cloth of Gold. Bridges, market-places,