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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 4 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 22 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 14 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 14 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 14 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Genoa (Italy) or search for Genoa (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 8 document sections:

Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Ingulphus Abbat of Croiland unto Jerusalem, performed (according to Florentius Wigorniensis) in the yeere of our Lord, 1064, and described by the said Ingulphus himselfe about the conclusion of his briefe Historie. (search)
most holy city both within and without, and having bestowed money for the reedifying of some, we desired with most ardent devotion to go forth into the countrey, to wash our selves in the most sacred river of Jordan , and to kisse all the steppes of Christ. Howbeit the theevish Arabians lurking upon every way, would not suffer us to travell farre from the city, by reason of their huge and furious multitudes. Wherefore about the spring there arrived at the port of Joppa a fleet of ships from Genoa . In which fleet (when the Christian merchants had exchanged all their wares at the coast townes, and had likewise visited the holy places) wee all of us embarked, committing our selves to the seas: and being tossed with many stormes and tempests, at length wee arrived at Brundusium : and so with a prosperous journey travelling thorow Apulia towards Rome, we there visited the habitations of the holy apostles Peter and Paul, and did reverence unto divers monuments of holy martyrs in all place
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Historie is somewhat otherwise recorded by Froysard and Holenshed in manner following, pag. 473. (search)
John de Beaufort bastarde sonne to the Duke of Lancaster (as Froysard hath noted) also Sir John Russell, Sir John Butler, Sir John Harecourt and others. They set forwarde in the latter ende of the thirteenth yeere of the Kings reigne, and came to Genoa , where they remayned not verie long, but that the gallies and other vessels of the Genouois were ready to passe them over into Barbarie. And so about midsomer in the begining of the foureteenth yere of this kings reigne the whole army being embarey, breeding in the army sundry diseases, they fell to a composition upon certaine articles to be performed in the behalfe of the Saracens: and so 61 dayes after their arrivall there they tooke the seas againe, and returned home, as in the histories of France and Genoa is likewise expressed. Where, by Polydore Virgil it may seeme, that the lord Henry of Lancaster earle of Derby should be generall of the English men, that (as before you heard) went into Barbary with the French men and Genouois.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Sir Thomas Chaloner to Alger with Charles the fift 1541, drawen out of his booke De Republica Anglorum instauranda. (search)
ke De Republica Anglorum instauranda. THOMAS CHALONER was by birth a Londiner, by studie a Cantabrigian, by education a Courtier, by religion a devout and true Christian. Therefore after he had confirmed his youth and minde in the studies of good learning, when Sir Henry Knevet was sent ambassadour from the mighty Prince Henry the 8. to the Emperour Charles the fift, he went with him as his familiar friend, or as one of his Councell. At which time the said Charles the 5. passing over from Genoa and Corsica to Alger in Africa in warlike sort, with a mighty army by sea, that honorable Knevet the kings ambassadour, Thomas Chaloner, Henry Knolles, and Henry Isham, right worthy persons, of their owne accord accompanied him in that expedition, & served him in that warre, wherin Thomas Chaloner escaped most wonderfully with his life. For the gaily wherein he was, being either dashed against the rockes, or shaken with mighty stormes, and so cast away, after he had saved himselfe a long
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage of M. Laurence Aldersey, to the Cities of Alexandria, and Cayro in Ægypt. Anno 1586. (search)
a saile about Cape Sprat, which is a litle on this side the streight of Gibraltare, but we spake not with her. The next day we descried twelve sayle more, with whom we thought to have spoken, to have learned what they were, but they made very fast away, and we gave them over. Thursday the 16 of March, we had sight of the streights, and of the coast of Barbary. The 18 day we passed them, and sailed towards Patras . Upon the 23 of March, we met with the Centurion of London which came from Genoa , by whom we sent letters to England, and the foure men also which we tooke in, upon the coast of England, beforementioned. The 29 of March we came to Goleta a small Iland, and had sight of two shippes, which we judged to be of England. Tuesday the fourth of Aprill, we were before Malta , and being there becalmed, our Maister caused the two ship boates to be had out, and they towed the ship, till we were out of sight of the Castle of Malta. The 9 day of Aprill we came to Zante , and b
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
hey may bee in a readinesse for any voyage howe long soever it bee: And likewise to arrest a Galeon of the Duke of Florence, which is very well armed and furnished with great ordinance, and passed lately from Alicante toward Cadiz , and to make up the number of fortie great shippes, which are to be had in Biscay and Guipuscoa: and that beeing rigged, armed and set in good order, they bee victualled for eight moneths, and that foorthwith there bee levied a thousand mariners of Catalunna and Genoa to bee divided among the Fleete, and bee conducted, as they were for the Fleete of Tercera: furthermore that sixe thousande souldiers bee levied, giving commaundement to presse a greater number, to the ende that these may bee able men for service. Moreover it is needfull for this armie that 20. pataches be brought from Biscay , and 20. Azabras from Castro . That the pataches bee from 50. to 60. tunnes: and that the Azabras bee like those which were in the expedition to Tercera. That su
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The opinion of Don Alvaro Bacan, Marques of Santa Cruz, and high Admirall of Spaine, touching the armie of sir Francis Drake lying at the Isles of Bayona in Galicia , written in Lisbon the 26 of October after the account of Spaine in the yere 1585. (search)
hey may bee in a readinesse for any voyage howe long soever it bee: And likewise to arrest a Galeon of the Duke of Florence, which is very well armed and furnished with great ordinance, and passed lately from Alicante toward Cadiz , and to make up the number of fortie great shippes, which are to be had in Biscay and Guipuscoa: and that beeing rigged, armed and set in good order, they bee victualled for eight moneths, and that foorthwith there bee levied a thousand mariners of Catalunna and Genoa to bee divided among the Fleete, and bee conducted, as they were for the Fleete of Tercera: furthermore that sixe thousande souldiers bee levied, giving commaundement to presse a greater number, to the ende that these may bee able men for service. Moreover it is needfull for this armie that 20. pataches be brought from Biscay , and 20. Azabras from Castro . That the pataches bee from 50. to 60. tunnes: and that the Azabras bee like those which were in the expedition to Tercera. That su
art the first man that ever sayled about me. And albeit this voyage was so long and troublesome as is before mentioned, yet many others have attempted the same. And the next that sought to passe the said streights of Magellan were two ships of Genoa , which comming as farre as the mouth of the streights were by a mightie storme driven backe againe, and one of them, whose master was called Pancaldo, put into the river of Plate, and was cast away about Buenos Aeres, where to this day part of the said ship is to be scene, and some of the men are yet living in the river among the Spaniards: and the other ship returned to Genoa againe. Also there was a bishop of Placencia in Spaine, who coveting riches, set foorth a fleet of foure sailes, to passe the streights, and so to goe for the Malucos : and getting license of the Emperour he sent his said 4 ships towards the streights which had very faire windes till they came thither: but being entered 20 leagues within the streights, a storm
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse of the West Indies and South sea written by Lopez Vaz a Portugal , borne in the citie of Elvas , continued unto the yere 1587. Wherein among divers rare things not hitherto delivered by any other writer, certaine voyages of our Englishmen are truely reported: which was intercepted with the author thereof at the river of Plate, by Captaine Withrington and Captaine Christopher Lister, in the fleete set foorth by the right Honorable the Erle of Cumberland for the South sea in the yeere 1586. (search)
art the first man that ever sayled about me. And albeit this voyage was so long and troublesome as is before mentioned, yet many others have attempted the same. And the next that sought to passe the said streights of Magellan were two ships of Genoa , which comming as farre as the mouth of the streights were by a mightie storme driven backe againe, and one of them, whose master was called Pancaldo, put into the river of Plate, and was cast away about Buenos Aeres, where to this day part of the said ship is to be scene, and some of the men are yet living in the river among the Spaniards: and the other ship returned to Genoa againe. Also there was a bishop of Placencia in Spaine, who coveting riches, set foorth a fleet of foure sailes, to passe the streights, and so to goe for the Malucos : and getting license of the Emperour he sent his said 4 ships towards the streights which had very faire windes till they came thither: but being entered 20 leagues within the streights, a storm