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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 4 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 22 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 14 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 14 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 14 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley. You can also browse the collection for Genoa (Italy) or search for Genoa (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 7: he wanders. (search)
terance, is the shabbiest and most broken-down looking large town, I, the present writer, an individual not wholly untraveled, ever saw, in a free State of this Confederacy. The shores of the lake there are bluffy, sixty feet or more above the water, and the land for many miles back is nearly a dead level, exceedingly fertile, and quite uninteresting. No, not quite. For much of the primeval forest remains, and the gigantic trees that were saplings when Columbus played in the streets of Genoa, tower aloft, a hundred feet without a branch, with that exquisite daintiness of taper of which the eye never tires, which architecture has never equalled, which only Grecian architecture approached, and was beautiful because it approached it. The City of Erie is merely a square mile of this level land, close to the edge of the bluff, with a thousand houses built upon it, which are arranged on the plan of a corn-field—only, not more than a third of the houses have come up. The town, however
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 26: three months in Europe. (search)
t length, a traveler crossed the Alps who had an eye for the necessities of the soil. Mr. Greeley spent twenty-one days in Italy, paying flying visits to Turin, Genoa, Pisa, Florence, Padua, Bologna, Venice, Milan, and passing about a week in Rome. At Genoa, he remarked that the kingdom of Sardinia, which contains a population Genoa, he remarked that the kingdom of Sardinia, which contains a population of only four millions, maintains sixty thousand priests, but not five thousand teachers of elementary knowledge; and that, while the churches of Genoa are worth four millions of dollars, the school-houses would not bring fifty thousand. The black-coated gentry fairly overshadow the land with their shovel-hats, so that corn has no cGenoa are worth four millions of dollars, the school-houses would not bring fifty thousand. The black-coated gentry fairly overshadow the land with their shovel-hats, so that corn has no chance of sunshine. Pisa, too, could afford to spend a hundred thousand dollars in fireworks to celebrate the anniversary of its patron saint; but can spare nothing for popular education. At Florence, the traveler passed some agreeable hours with Hiram Powers, felt that his Greek Slave and Fisher Boy were not the loftiest achievem