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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
he chiefs and of the troops, could also have an influence upon the opportuneness of such movements. In fact, the often cited marches of Jena and of Ulm were veritable flank manoeuvres, quite like that upon Milan after the passage of the Chiusella, and like that of Marshal Paskiewics for crossing the Vistula at Ossiek; every one knows how they succeeded. It is otherwise with tactical movements, made by flank in presence of the enemy. Ney was punished for this at Dennewitz; Marmont at Salamanca, and Frederick the Great at Kollin. Meanwhile, the manoeuvre of Frederick the Great at Leuthen, become so celebrated in the annals of the art, was a veritable movement of this kind, (see chapter VI, Treatise on Grand Operations;) but skillfully covered by a mass of cavalry, concealed by the heights, and operated against an army which remained immovable in its camp, it had an immense success, because, at the moment of the shock, it was really the army of Daun which lent the flank, and no
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
ggressor; 5th. That he direct his blows upon the decisive points. The example of Bonaparte at Rivoli and at Austerlitz, that of Wellington at Talavera, at Salamanca and at Waterloo, prove these truths. Article XXXII: offensive battles, and different orders of battle. We understand by offensive battles those which anlated centre, and surrounding afterwards that left, thrust between the lakes of Tellnitz and Melnitz. Finally, it is known how Wellington gained the battle of Salamanca by a manoeuvre nearly similar, because the left of Marmont, which wished to cut him off from the route to Portugal, ]eft a gap of half a league, from which the Ed unable to second each other, would not have known how to profit by the two extended movements attempted against him. In the same manner, Marmont was unlucky at Salamanca, in having to struggle against an adversary whose best acknowledged merit was a tried and rapid tactical coup d'oeil; before the Duke of York or More he would pr