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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
nemy himself, and hear nothing of them from merchant vessels, we may judge of the probability of waylaying our adversary on the broad Atlantic. The escape of another Toulon fleet in 1805; the long search for them in the Mediterranean by the same able officer; the pursuit in the West Indies; their evasion of him among the islands; the return to Europe; his vain efforts subsequently, along the coast of Portugal, in the bay of Biscay, and off the English channel; and the meeting at last at Trafalgar, brought about only because the combined fleets, trusting to the superiority that the accession of several reinforcements had given, were willing to try the issue of a battle — these are instances, of the many that might be cited, to show how small is the probability of encountering upon the ocean an enemy who desires to avoid a meeting, and how little the most untiring zeal, the most restless activity, the most exalted professional skill and judgment, can do to lessen the adverse chances.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berlin decree, the. (search)
ance a measure calculated to starve the empire. By Orders in Council (May 16) the whole coast of Europe from the Elbe, in Germany, to Brest, in France, a distance of about 800 miles, was declared to be in a state of blockade, when, at the same time, the British navy could not spare vessels enough from other fields of service to enforce the blockade over a third of the prescribed coast. It was essentially a paper blockade. The almost entire destruction of the French and Spanish fleets at Trafalgar, a few months before, had annihilated her rivals in the contest for the sovereignty of the seas, and she now resolved to control the trade of the world. Napoleon had dissolved the German Empire, prostrated Prussia at his feet, and, from the Imperial Camp at Berlin, he issued (Nov. 21, 1806) the famous decree in which he declared the British Islands in a state of blockade; forbade all correspondence or trade with England; defined all articles of English manufacture or produce as contraband
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Free thought. (search)
ressive, but made him, after her rule, moral, insisting on early marriage, on remarriage, controlling his habits and amusements with an almost Puritan strictness. Probably French Canada has been as good and as happy as anything the Catholic Church had to show. From fear of New England Puritanism it had kept its people loyal to Great Britain during the Revolutionary War. From fear of French atheism it kept its people loyal to Great Britain during the war with France. It sang Te Deum for Trafalgar. So things were till the other day. But then came the Jesuit. He got back, from the subserviency of the Canadian politicians, the lands which he had lost after the conquest and the suppression of his order. He supplanted the Gallicans, captured the hierarchy, and prevailed over the great Sulpician Monastery in a struggle for the pastorate of Montreal. Other influences have of late been working for change in a direction neither Gallican nor Jesuit. Railroads have broken into the rural
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Santiago, naval battle of (search)
and Castile, shall know Spain no more. They lift the veil of the historic past, and see that on that July morning a great empire had met its end, and passed finally out of the New World, because it was unfit to rule and govern men. And they and all men see now, and ever more clearly will see, that in the fight off Santiago another great fact had reasserted itself for the consideration of the world. For that fight had displayed once more the victorious sea spirit of a conquering race. It is the spirit of the Jomsberg Viking, who, alone and wounded, springs into the sea from his sinking boat with defiance on Santiago from the Harbor. his lips. It comes down through Grenville and Drake and Howard and Blake, on to Perry and Macdonough and Hull and Decatur. Here on this summer Sunday it has been shown again to be as vital and as clear as ever, even as it was with Nelson dying at Trafalgar, and with Farragut and his men in the fights of bay and river more than thirty years before.
ems to have considered it an amusing experiment, and no more. In 1792, Mr. Murdoch, of Redruth, Cornwall, England, erected a gas-distilling apparatus and lighted his house and offices by gas distributed through service-pipes. In 1798, Murdoch lighted with gas the works of Boulton and Watt, Soho, near Birmingham. On the occasion of a public rejoicing for peace, 1802, he made an illumination of the Works; probably an outside exhibition of his pet, on the walls of the establishment. Trafalgar, Austerlitz, and Jena, within four years afterwards, is a curious commentary. In 1801, Le Bon, of Paris, lighted his house and garden, and proposed to light the city of Paris. The English periodicals of 1803 and thereabout refer to the proposition of Murdoch to use the gas obtained by the distillation of coal, and state that the use of the gas for light, heat, ammonia, or oil would be an infringement of the patent of the Earl of Dundonald; farther, that the amount of water produced b
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Irving (search)
lized later in the Tales of a traveller. During these journeys he took notes, wrote them out in a full journal, portions of which are shortly to be published, and utilized his material in elaborate letters to his relations. From Naples, crossing to Palermo, he went by stage to Messina, and he was there in 1805 when the vessels of Nelson passed through the straits in their search for the combined French and Spanish fleet under Villeneuve, a search which culminated in the great victory at Trafalgar. Journeying in Europe during those years of war and of national upheaval was a dangerous matter. Irving was stopped more than once, and on one occasion was arrested at some place in France on the charge of being an English spy. He seems to have borne the troublesome interruptions with a full measure of equanimity, and he used each delay to good purpose as an opportunity for a more leisurely study of the environment and of the persons with whom he came into touch. He returned to New Yo
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
t; and yet, such secret charms has this life, that there is no instance remembered, or on record, of any one who has returned to the world. Neither have they been men who came here from the lowest classes of society, ignorant of the pleasures of this world, for there is hardly a noble family in Cordova that has not furnished more than one hermit. There are four or five such there now, besides one that has been a colonel in the army, another that commanded a frigate, and fought bravely at Trafalgar. . . . The Elder Brother himself, who has been there twenty-six years, might, if he would return to his family, claim a title and fortune; but these things have lost all charms for him. Yet a more benevolent countenance and manners, or more unaffected kindness, I have rarely seen. He inquired of the Duke very minutely about his friends and relations, told him many anecdotes of their youth, and but for the solitude of his cell, his sackcloth, and his flowing beard, it would have been diff
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
eat Britain. In the autumn of 1805 two great events disconcerted the policy of America as well as the relations of Europe. October 21st, the naval victory of Trafalgar confirmed Great Britain's supremacy on the ocean. December 2d, Austerlitz made Napoleon dictator of continental Europe, shattered the combinations of Pitt and cle waiting for reinforcements and repairing his vessels, he lost the favorable moment. Lord Nelson returned and was, indeed, before him. Then came the battle of Trafalgar, and the navy which the purchase money of Louisiana had helped to build was destroyed. Had the genius of Napoleon been able to reach out over the ocean as it a was impracticable. Napoleon had just furnished an example in the attempt to convert France into a maritime nation by imperial mandate. The result was seen at Trafalgar. The wise men who guided the affairs of the United States knew the difficulties in the way. They had endeavored to avoid war, and they knew that the resources o
The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], Averill's Raid — Attack at Dublin Depot. (search)
in both. The sea was narrow; the vessels numerous, the fleets actually crossed each other on a certain night; yet Nelson could see nothing of them himself, and heard nothing of them from merchant vessels. In 1805 another Toulon fleet escaped from Nelson. He sought for it in vain in the Mediterranean; then proceeded to the West Indies; then back to Europe, along the coast of Portugal, in the Bay of Biscay, and off the English Channel. But all in vain. When they did meet at last at Trafalgar it was because both fleets were willing to try the issue of a battle. If great squadrons can thus elude the vigilance of an enemy, how much more easily single ships, built for speed, and designed to prey upon the commerce of its adversary. We have seen how for years a few Confederate vessels have foiled the whole naval power of the United States. --Whenever they have come in collision with a Yankee man-of-war they have whipped her, but the cases of collision have been only two in thr
in both. The sea was narrow; the vessels numerous; the fleets actually crossed each other on a certain night; yet Nelson could see nothing of them himself, and heard nothing of them from merchant vessels. In 1805 another Toulon fleet escaped from Nelson. He sought for it in vain in the Mediterranean; then proceeded to the West Indies; then back to Europe, along the coast of Portugal, in the Bay of Biscay, and off the English Channel. But all in vain. When they did meet at last at Trafalgar it was because both fleets were willing to try the issue of a battle. If great squadrons can thus elude the vigilance of an enemy, how much more easily single ships, built for speed, and designed to prey upon the commerce of its adversary. We have seen how for years a few Confederate vessels have foiled the whole naval power of the United States. --Whenever they have come in collision with a Yankee man-of-war they have whipped her, but the cases of collision have been only two in thr