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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the Susan of London to Constantinople, wherein the worshipfull M. William Harborne was sent first Ambassadour unto Sultan Murad Can, the great Turke, with whom he continued as her Majesties Ligier almost sixe yeeres. (search)
that sate on the South side of the Privy chamber sate likewise on cloth of golde. Many officers or Janisaries there were with staves, who kept very good order, for no Turke whatsoever might goe any further then they willed him. At our Ambassadours entring they followed that bare his presents, to say, twelve fine broad clothes, two pieces of fine holland, tenne pieces of plate double gilt, one case of candlesticks, the case whereof was very large, and three foot high and more, two very great Cannes or pots, and one lesser, one basin and ewer, two poppinjayes of silver, the one with two heads: they were to drinke in: two bottles with chaines, three faire mastifs in coats of redde cloth, three spaniels, two bloodhounds, one common hunting hound, two greyhounds, two little dogges in coats of silke: one clocke valued at five hundred pounds sterling: over it was a forrest with trees of silver, among the which were deere chased with dogs, and men on horsebacke following, men drawing of wa
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage made by Master William Towrson Marchant of London, to the coast of Guinea, with two Ships, in the yeere 1555. (search)
hing but that which they might spare us for our money. So we tooke of them 3. Tapnets of figges, two small pots of oyle, two pipes of water, foure hogsheads of saltfish which they had taken upon the coast, and certaine fresh fish which they did not esteeme, because there is such store upon that coast, that in an houre and sometime lesse, a man may take as much fish as will serve twentie men a day. For these things, and for some wine which wee dranke aboorde of them, and three or foure great Cannes which they sent aboord of our shippes, I payed them twentie and seven Pistolets, which was twise as much as they willingly would have taken: and so let them goe to their ancre and cable which they had let slippe, and got it againe by our helpe. After this wee set saile, but the winde caused us to ancre againe about twelve leagues off the river del Oro, as the Portugals tolde us. There were five Carvels more in this place, but when they sawe us, they made all away for feare of us. The 15.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voiage of the right honorable George Erle of Cumberland to the Azores , &c. Written by the excellent Mathematician and Enginier master Edward Wright. (search)
Some that wanted sheetes, hanged up nakins, and cloutes, and watched them till they were thorow wet, then wringing and sucking out the water. And that water which fell downe and washed away the filth and soyling of the shippe, trod under foote, as bad as running downe the kennell many times when it raineth, was not lost I warrant you, but watched and attended carefully (yea sometimes with strife and contention) at every scupper-hole, and other place where it ranne downe, with dishes, pots, Cannes , and Jarres, whereof some drunke hearty draughts even as it was, mud and all, without tarrying to dense or settle it : Others clensed it first, but not often, for it was so thicke and went so slowly thorow, that they might ill endure to tary so long, and were loth to loose too much of such precious stuffe: some licked with their tongues (like dogges) the boards under feete, the sides, railes, and Masts of the shippe : others that were more ingenious, fastened girdles or ropes about the Ma
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
, and occupied the best efforts of three persons. What with a tedious sitting for my portrait, visits, interviews, dining-out, telegraphic and postal correspondence, calls of friends, instructions to the artist for the book, and revisions of my Ms., it appears to me wonderful that I was able to endure the strain of writing half a million of words, and all else; but, thank Goodness! by the middle of April, the book was out of my hands, and I was alive and free. From Cairo, I proceeded to Cannes, to consult with Sir William Mackinnon about East Africa, and explain about German aggressiveness in that region. Thence I moved to Paris; and, not many days later, I was in Brussels, where I was received with a tremendous demonstration of military and civilian honours. All the way to the royal palace, where I was to be lodged, the streets were lined with troops, and behind these was the populace shouting their vivas! It appeared to me that a great change had come over Belgian public opin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Clerel, Count de 1805-1859 (search)
Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Clerel, Count de 1805-1859 Statesman; born in Paris, France, July 29, 1805; became a lawyer in 1827; visited the United States with Gustave de Beaumont in 1831 to study the penitentiary system. Returning to France he there advocated the solitary method as practised in the penitentiary of Cherry Hill, Philadelphia, and was largely instrumental in entirely remodelling not only the penitentiary system of France, but of the continent. He was the author of The penitentiary system of the United States and its application in France (with Gustave de Beaumont); Democracy in America; On the penitentiary system in the United States and the confidential mission for the minister of the Interior of Mm. De Beaumont and de Tocqueville, etc. He died in Cannes, France, April 16, 1859.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
then took an open gig, and at three o'clock drove into the court-yard-all surrounded by battlements — of Brougham Hall. Lord Brougham was born in 1779 and died in 1868. His mother, Eleanora, the only child of Rev. James Syme, and on her mother's side the niece of Robertson the historian, died Dec. 31, 1839, at the age (as given in Burke's Peerage) of eighty-nine. His Lordship's daughter, an only child, died Nov. 30, 1839, at the age of seventeen. He bought, in 1840, an estate near Cannes, France, and built upon it a house which he called Chateau Eleanor Louise, in memory of his daughter, to whom tributes on its walls were inscribed by himself and his friends. Campbell's Life of Brougham, ch. VI. and VIII. He died at this retreat, where he was accustomed to pass the winter season. In 1838, he was writing Sketches of Statesmen of the Time of George III., which were published, 1839-43. He invited Sumner to dine with him at 4 Grafton Street, London, in February, 1839. In the l
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one of the most beautiful women I have ever seen; Courtenay, Philip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging to the Northern Circuit. Sumner dined with him at 23 Montague Street, Russell Square. M. P., and his beautiful daughter; Eastlake, the accomplished artist; and Lord B
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one of the most beautiful women I have ever seen; Courtenay, Philip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging to the Northern Circuit. Sumner dined with him at 23 Montague Street, Russell Square. M. P., and his beautiful daughter; Eastlake, the accomplished artist; and Lord B
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
day Agassiz dined with me; we always talk of Martins. Pray tell him how grateful I am for his friendly thought of me. The railway journey from Montpellier to Marseilles, broken by a day at Aries, greatly wearied him. Between Marseilles and Toulon he had while in the diligence another attack of the angina pectoris,—the first he had experienced for more than three months. It came so sharply that he was on the point of asking the driver to stop; but he was shortly relieved, and went on. At Cannes he met Lord Brougham and Baron Bunsen, Bunsen made a long call on him, in which Sumner was struck by his learning and humanity.—both anticipating his arrival with most cordial notes of invitation. He made pauses at Genoa, Pisa, Lucca, and Florence, At Florence, where he remained ten days, he was entertained at the British Legation, and by M. Francois Sabatier-Unger at the Villa Concezione, to whom he had been commended by Mr. Gordon. Besides visits to the churches and galleries, he t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
si favorablement accueilli par le public. Le General Sabine maecrit que la traduction Anglaise est terminee, et va paraitre incessamment. La meme nouvelle m'est venue de France, de la part de M. Galuzzi, qui a passe tout l'hiver dans le midi, á Cannes. Le grand et bel ouvrage d'agassiz (les deux volumes) ne m'est arrive que depuis quelques jours. II produira un grand effet, par la grandeur des vues generales, et l'extreme sagacitye dans les observations speciales embryologiques. Je n'ai jgun and so favorably received by the public. General Sabine writes me that the English translation is finished and will appear immediately. The same news comes to me from France, from M. Galuzzi, who has been passing the winter in the south, at Cannes. The great and beautiful work of Agassiz (the first two volumes) reached me only a few days since. It will produce a great effect by the breadth of its general views, and by the extreme sagacity of its special embryological observations. I n
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