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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 14 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 2 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Laconia, chapter 18 (search)
of Geryones. At the upper edge of the throne are wrought, one on each side, the sons of Tyndareus on horses. There are sphinxes under the horses, and beasts running upwards, on the one side a leopard, by Polydeuces a lioness. On the very top of the throne has been wrought a band of dancers, the Magnesians who helped Bathycles to make the throne. Underneath the throne, the inner part away from the Tritons contains the hunting of the Calydonian boar and Heracles killing the children of Actor. Calais and Zetes are driving the Harpies away from Phineus. Peirithous and Theseus have seized Helen, and Heracles is strangling the lion. Apollo and Artemis are shooting Tityus. There is represented the fight between Heracles and Oreius the Centaur, and also that between Theseus and the Bull of Minos. There are also represented the wrestling of Heracles with Achelous, the fabled binding of Hera by Hephaestus, the games Acastus held in honor of his father, and the story of Menelaus and the Egyptian
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 4 For Arcesilas of Cyrene Chariot Race 462 B. C. (search)
Pylos and the other from the headland of Taenarus; you both achievednoble fame, Euphemus and wide-ruling Periclymenus. And from Apollo the lyre-player came, the father of songs, much-praised Orpheus. And Hermes of the golden wand sent two sons to take part in the unabating toil, Echion and Erytus, bursting with youth. Swiftlycame those that dwell around the foothills of Mount Pangaeon, for with a smiling spirit their father Boreas, king of the winds, quickly and willingly equipped Zetes and Calais with purple wings bristling down their backs. And Hera kindled in the demigods an all-persuasive sweet longing for the ship Argo, so that no one would be left behind to stay by his mother's side, nursing a life without danger, but even at the risk of death would find the finest elixir of excellence together with his other companions. When the choicest seamen came down to Iolcus, Jason reviewed and praised them all; andthe seer Mopsus, making his prophecy from birds and the casting of sacred
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington), Book 3, Poem 9 (search)
Horace While I had power to bless you, Nor any round that neck his arms did fling More privileged to caress you, Happier was Horace than the Persian king. LydiaWhile you for none were pining Sorer, nor Lydia after Chloe came, Lydia, her peers outshining, Might match her own with Ilia's Roman fame. HoraceNow Chloe is my treasure, Whose voice, whose touch, can make sweet music flow: For her I'd die with pleasure, Would Fate but spare the dear survivor so. LydiaI love my own fond lover, Young Calais, son of Thurian Ornytus: For him I'd die twice over, Would Fate but spare the sweet survivor thus. HoraceWhat now, if Love returning Should pair us 'neath his brazen yoke once more, And, bright-hair'd Chloe spurning, Horace to off-cast Lydia ope his door? LydiaThough he is fairer, milder, Than starlight, you lighter than bark of tree, Than stormy Hadria wilder, With you to live, to die, were bliss for me.
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 6, line 675 (search)
earth and ruffle the wide sea— and, swiftly wrapping untrod mountain peaks in whirling mantles of far-woven dust, thence downward hovered to the darkened world; and, canopied in artificial night of swarthy overshadowing wings, caught up the trembling Orithyia to his breast: nor did he hesitate in airy course until his huge wings fanned the chilling winds around Ciconian Walls. There, she was pledged the wife of that cold, northern king of storms; and unto him she gave those hero twins, endowed with wings of their immortal sire, and graceful in their mother's form and face. Their bird-like wings were not fledged at their birth and those twin boys, Zetes and Calais, at first were void of feathers and soft down. But when their golden hair and beards were grown, wings like an eagle's came;—and feather-down grew golden on their cheeks: and when from youth they entered manhood, quick they were to join the Argonauts, who for the Golden Fleece, sought in that first ship, ventured on the s
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 7, line 1 (search)
Over the storm-tossed waves, the Argonauts had sailed in Argo, their long ship to where King Phineus, needy in his old age, reigned— deprived of sight and feeble. When the sons of Boreas had landed on the shore, and seen the Harpies snatching from the king his nourishment, befouling it with beaks obscene, they drove those human-vultures thence. And having suffered hardships and great toils, after the day they rescued the sad king from the vile Harpies, those twin valiant youths, Zetes and Calais came with their chief, the mighty Jason, where the Phasis flows. From the green margin of that river, all the crew of Argonauts, by Jason led, went to the king Aeetes and required the Golden Fleece, that he received from Phryxus. When they had bargained with him, full of wiles he offered to restore the Golden Fleece only to those who might to him return, victorious from hard labors of great risk. Medea, the king's daughter, near his throne, saw Jason, leader of the Argonauts, as he was press
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz), Book 1, Addressed to Gallus (search)
ASAThessalian port where Argo was built, set sail. MYSIAsouth shore of the Propontis, or Black Sea. ZETES . . . AND . . . CALAISThis version found only here; elsewhere, Zetes and Calais, winged sons of North wind god Boreas, persuade Argonauts to givCalais, winged sons of North wind god Boreas, persuade Argonauts to give up search for Hercules; then killed by him. ORITHYIAdaughter of Erechtheus, son of Pandion; mother of Zetes and Calais. HAMADRYADStree nymphs, but seems to stand for nymphs in general; here, of course, they are water nymphs. PEGEspring in Mysia. Calais. HAMADRYADStree nymphs, but seems to stand for nymphs in general; here, of course, they are water nymphs. PEGEspring in Mysia. I make you this warning, Gallus, in favor of continuous love (so that you don't lose your mind and forget): Disaster often comes to the unsuspecting lover. The cruel Ascanius made that plain to the Argonauts. Your boy approximates Theiodamantean Hyond, to seek fresh water from a hidden spring. Two brothers follow him, Aquilonian seed, Zetes is above him and above him Calais, standing with hands poised to snatch kisses, to smother him with kisses, one at a time. He hangs beneath a high wing, hi
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 6, line 675 (search)
did hir beare. And as he flew, the flames of love enkindled more and more By meanes of stirring. Neither did he stay his flight before He came within the land and towne of Cicons with his pray. And there soone after being made his wife she hapt to lay Hir belly, and a paire of boyes she at a burthen brings, Who else in all resembled full their mother, save in wings The which they of their father tooke. Howbeit (by report) They were not borne with wings upon their bodies in this sort. While Calais and Zetes had no beard upon their chin, They both were callow. But as soone as haire did once begin In likenesse of a yellow Downe upon their cheekes to sprout, Then (even as comes to passe in Birdes) the feathers budded out Togither on their pinyons too, and spreaded round about On both their sides. And finally when childhod once was spent And youth come on, togither they with other Minyes went To Colchos in the Galley that was first devisde in Greece, Upon a sea as then unknowen, to fetch
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Libellus de politica conservatia Maris. Or, The Pollicy of keeping the Sea. (search)
for slought you not atteynt: Kepe well that grounde, for harme that may ben used, Or afore God mutte yee ben accused. Of the commodious Stockfish of Island, and keeping of the Sea, namely the Narrow sea, with an incident of the keeping of Caleis. Chap. 10. OF Island to write is litle nede, Save of Stock-fish: Yet forsooth in deed Out of Bristowe, and costes many one, Men have practised by nedle and by stone Thider wardes within a litle while, Within twelve yere, and without perilhe sharpe narrow see, Betweene Dover and Caleis: and as thus that foes passe none without good will of us: And they abide our danger in the length, What for our costis and Caleis in our strength. An exhortation for the sure keeping of Caleis. AND for the love of God, and of his blisse Cherish yee Caleis better then it is. See well thereto, and heare the grete complaint That true men tellen, that woll no lies paint, And as yee know that writing commeth from thence: Doe not
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the commodious Stockfish of Island, and keeping of the Sea, namely the Narrow sea, with an incident of the keeping of Caleis. Chap. 10. (search)
Of the commodious Stockfish of Island, and keeping of the Sea, namely the Narrow sea, with an incident of the keeping of Caleis. Chap. 10. OF Island to write is litle nede, Save of Stock-fish: Yet forsooth in deed Out of Bristowe, and costes many one, Men have practised by nedle and by stone Thider wardes within a litle while, Within twelve yere, and without perill Gon and come, as men were wont of old Of Scarborough unto the costes cold. And nowe so fele shippes this yeere there wahe sharpe narrow see, Betweene Dover and Caleis: and as thus that foes passe none without good will of us: And they abide our danger in the length, What for our costis and Caleis in our strength. An exhortation for the sure keeping of Caleis. AND for the love of God, and of his blisse Cherish yee Caleis better then it is. See well thereto, and heare the grete complaint That true men tellen, that woll no lies paint, And as yee know that writing commeth from thence: Doe not
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An exhortation for the sure keeping of Caleis. (search)
An exhortation for the sure keeping of Caleis. AND for the love of God, and of his blisse Cherish yee Caleis better then it is. See well thereto, and heare the grete complaint That true men tellen, that woll no lies paint, And as yee know that writing commeth from thence: Doe not to England for slought so great offence, But that redressed it bee for any thing: Leste a song of sorrow that wee sing. For litle wenith the foole who so might chese What harme it were good Caleis for to lese: What wo it were for all this English ground. Which wel conceived the Emperour Sigismound, That of all joyes made it one of the moste, That Caleis was subject unto English coste. Him thought it was a jewel most of all, And so the same in Latine did it call. And if yee wol more of Caleis heare and knowe, I cast to write within a litle scrowe, Like as I have done before by and by In other parteis of our policie. Loke how hard it was at the firs
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