Your search returned 44 results in 20 document sections:

1 2
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The true copie of a note found written in one of the two ships, to wit, the Speranza, which wintred in Lappia, where sir Hugh Willoughby and all his companie died, being frozen to death. Anno 1553. (search)
d beene the deepe of winter, we thought best to winter there. Wherefore we sent out three men Southsouthwest, to search if they could find people, who went three dayes journey, but could finde none: after that, we sent other three Westward foure daies journey, which also returned without finding any people. Then sent we three men Southeast three dayes journey, who in like sorte returned without finding of people, or any similitude of habitation. These two notes following were written upon the outside of this Pamphlet, or Booke. 1 The proceedings of Sir Hugh Willoughbie after he was separated from the Edward Bonaventure. 2 Our shippe being at an anker in the harbour called Sterfier in the Island Lofoote. The river or haven wherein Sir Hugh Willoughbie with the companie of his two ships perished for cold, is called Arzina in Lapland , neere unto Kegor. But it appeareth by a Will found in the ship that Sir Hugh Willoughbie and most of the company were alive in January 1554.
These two notes following were written upon the outside of this Pamphlet, or Booke. 1 The proceedings of Sir Hugh Willoughbie after he was separated from the Edward Bonaventure. 2 Our shippe being at an anker in the harbour called Sterfier in the Island Lofoote. The river or haven wherein Sir Hugh Willoughbie with the companie of his two ships perished for cold, is called Arzina in Lapland , neere unto Kegor. But it appeareth by a Will found in the ship that Sir Hugh Willoughbie and most of the company were alive in January 1554.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Ambassage of the right worshipfull Master Thomas Randolfe, Esquire, to the Emperour of Russia, in the yeere 1568, briefly written by himselfe. (search)
with my company, being to the number of fortie persons or thereabout: of which the one halfe were gentlemen, desirous to see the world. Within one dayes sailing, we were out of the sight of land, and following our course directly North, till we came to the North Cape, we sailed for the space of twelve dayes with a prosperous winde, without tempest or outrage of sea: having compassed the North Cape we directed our course flat Southeast, having upon our right hand Norway , Wardhouse, Lapland , all out of sight till we came to Cape Gallant: and so sailing betweene two bayes, the two and thirtieth day after our departure from Harwich , we cast ancre at Saint Nicholas road. In all the time of our voyage, more then the great number of Whales ingendering together, which we might plainly beholde, and the Sperma Cetae, which we might see swimming upon the sea, there was no great thing to be woondered at. Sometimes we had calmes, wherein our Mariners fished, and tooke good store of dive
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The names of such countries as I Anthony Jenkinson have travelled unto, from the second of October 1546, at which time I made my first voyage out of England, untill the yeere of our Lord 1572, when I returned last out of Russia . (search)
Algiers , Cola, Bona , Tripolis, the gollet within the gulfe of Tunis . I have sailed farre Northward within the Mare glaciale, where we have had continuall day, and sight of the Sunne ten weekes together, and that navigation was in Norway , Lapland , Samogitia, and other very strange places. I have travelled through all the ample dominions of the Emperour of Russia and Moscovia, which extende from the North sea, and the confines of Norway and Lapland , even to the Mare Caspium. I havLapland , even to the Mare Caspium. I have bene in divers countries neere about the Caspian sea, Gentiles, and Mahomeans, as Cazan, Cremia , Rezan, Cheremisi, Mordoviti, Vachin, Nagaia, with divers others of strange customes and religions. I have sailed over the Caspian sea, & discovered all the regions thereabout adjacent, as Chircassi, Comul, Shascal, Shirvan, with many others. I have travelled 40 daies journey beyond the said sea, towards the Oriental India, and Cathaia, through divers deserts and wildernesses, and passed thro
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Henrie Lane to the worshipfull M. William Sanderson, conteining a briefe discourse of that which passed in the Northeast discovery for the space of three and thirtie yeres. (search)
ved. Anno 1556. The company sent two ships for Russia , with extraordinary masters and saylers to bring home the two ships, which were frozen in Lappia, in the river of Arzina aforesaid. The two ships sent this yeere from England sailing from Lapland to the Bay of S. Nicholas, tooke in lading with passengers, to wit, a Russe ambassador, named Joseph Napea, and some of his men shipped with Richard Chanceller in the Edward. But so it fel out that the two which came from Lappia, with all their new Masters and Mariners, never were heard of, but in foule weather, and wrought seas, after their two yeeres wintring in Lapland , became, as is supposed, unstanch, and sunke, wherein were drowned also divers Russes merchants, and servants of the ambassadour. A third shippe the Edward aforesayd, falling on the North part of Scotland , upon a rocke was also lost, and Master Chanceller, with divers other, drowned. The sayd Russe ambassadour hardly escaping, with other his men, mariners, & some
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The testimonie of Gerardus Mercator in his last large Mappe of Europe, touching the notable discoveries of the English, made of Moscovie by the Northeast. (search)
The testimonie of Gerardus Mercator in his last large Mappe of Europe, touching the notable discoveries of the English, made of Moscovie by the Northeast. THE most famous navigation of the English men by the Northeast sea hath offered unto me a great occasion, and certaine direction for the reformation of the mappe of Europe: which discoverie hath the Northerne parts of Finmarke, Lapland , and Moscovie, laied out according to the just elevation and the quarters of the world. And further, the true observation of the latitude of the city of Mosco, made by the foresaid Englishmen, hath yeelded me an infallible rule, for the correcting of the situation of the inland countries: which notable helps being ministred unto me, I thought it my duetie to exhibite to the world this Mappe, more exact and perfect then hitherto it hath bene published.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Another testimonie of Joannes Metellus Sequanus concerning the same Navigation and Discoveries in his Preface prefixed before Osorius de rebus gestis Emanuelis Regis Portugalliae, written about the yeere, 1574. (search)
all and the whole glory of discovering the Ocean sea should be ascribed to the Spaniards, the Englishmen about twentie yeeres past, by a new navigation into Moscovie, discovered the Northeast partes. For they by reason of the warres of Swethland being hindered from the traffique of the Moscovites and of the Narve in Liefland, opened a passage for themselves by the Ocean sea, beyond the Northerne latitude of 70. degrees: having in their course on the one side the coastes of Norway , Finmark, Lapland , Scrickfin and Biarmia: On the other side the coast of Gronland . Which voyage the Hollanders afterwarde entred into, but not without some conflict with the English. They cary thither old plate and course linnen cloth, and all kind of small Mercerie wares, serving for the apparelling of men and women, as linnen, and silke girdles, garters, purses, knives, and many such like things. And they bring away from the Moscovites, all kinde of precious Furres, and Salmons salted and dried in the smo
Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisLombard & WhitmoreBoston140 294 ShipDorchesterT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellEnoch & Samuel TrainBoston & Medford415 295 BarkOlgaT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellBates & Co.Boston343 296 ShipMiltonT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellHenry OxnardBoston611 297 ShipGranadaT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellHenry OxnardBoston606 298 ShipThomas H. PerkinsS. Lapham'sS. LaphamJ. E. LodgeBoston700 2991843ShipEssexSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJ. H. PearsonBoston700 300 ShipLaplandJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonB. C. WhiteBoston574 301 ShipEdward EverettP. Curtis'sP. CurtisB. BangsBoston662 302 BarkMissouriJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisFairfield, Lincoln, & Co.Boston331 303 ShipPaul JonesT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellBacon & ForbesBoston667 304 BarkPaulinaT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellBacon & ForbesBoston243 305 BarkLenoxT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellT. B. Wales & Co.Boston448 306 BarkStamboulT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellIasigi & GoddardBoston286 307 Bark
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arctic exploration. (search)
complish such a passage. The Cabots [John Cabot; Sebastian Cabot (q. v.)] went in the direction of the pole, northwestward, at or near the close of the fifteenth century, and penetrated as far north as 67° 30′, or half-way up to (present) Davis Strait. The next explorers were the brothers Cortereal, who made three voyages in that direction, 1500-02. In 1553 Sir Hugh Willoughby set out to find a northwest passage to India, but was driven back from Nova Zembla, and perished on the shore of Lapland. In 1576-78 Martin Frobisher made three voyages to find a northwest passage into the Pacific Ocean, and discovered the entrance to Hudson Bay. Between 1585 and 1587 John Davis discovered the strait that bears his name. The Dutch made strenuous efforts to discover a northeast passage. Willem Barentz (q. v.) made three voyages in that direction in 1594-96, and perished on his third voyage. Henry Hudson tried to round the north of Europe and Asia in 1607-08, but failed, and, pushing for t
dary between the continents. Next is the map of the world according to Eratosthenes and Strabo. Eratosthenes (276-196 B. C.) of Alexandria was the discoverer of the obliquity of the ecliptic, and was the founder of geodesy. He determined the circumference of the earth by measuring a degree of the meridian. Measurements of an are of the meridian have been made by the Chaldeans, by Eratosthenes, by Al Maimon, by Pire, and more lately by the French, English, Germans, and others; in Peru, Lapland, British India, and elsewhere. (See armil ; armillary-sphere ; astronomical instruments ; odometer.) We regard Eratosthenes with profound respect as the author of the science of geography, and the name thereof. The extent of each zone he determined by the length of the solstitial day, and called them elimates. The map of the world by Hipparchus (150 B. C.) is founded on the discoveries of Eratosthenes, and is the first recorded attempt to assign geographical positions by longitudes and
1 2