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u I must commit myself once more to the ocean, of which at times I have a nervous horror, as to the arms of my Father. The sea is his, and He made it. It is a rude, noisy old servant, but it is always obedient to his will, and cannot carry me beyond his power and love, wherever or to whatever it bears me. Having established her daughters in a Protestant boarding-school in Paris, Mrs. Stowe proceeded to London. While there she received the following letter from Harriet Martineau:-- Ambleside, June 1. Dear Mrs. Stowe,--I have been at my wits' end to learn how to reach you, as your note bore no direction but London. Arnolds, Croppers, and others could give no light, and the newspapers tell only where you had been. So I commit this to your publishers, trusting that it will find you somewhere, and in time, perhaps, bring you here. Can't you come? You are aware that we shall never meet if you don't come soon. I see no strangers at all, but I hope to have breath and strengt
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 14: European travel. (1846-1847.) (search)
y German, with his horrid chat and smirk. His foolish way of addressing an intelligent child. Kendal, the Castle. To Ambleside. Drive presents a landscape for once, lit up by sunshine as exquisite as I had hoped even. Man and Nature go hand in bog-earth and sand, plant the fuchsias, and give them constantly a great deal of water-this is all that is needful. Ambleside. Miss Martineau's house. The look of health in her face, but a harried, excited, over-stimulated state of mind. Home Cultivated and liberal mind of the manufacturer. Ditto of the country gentleman. Countess Hahn Hahn had just been at Ambleside. Wednesday. To Langdale. Scaurfell the scene of the Excursion. Rothay church. First fall lunch in the farm-house.s Briggs of the ease with which one may be lost in the mist. This 26th was Eddie's birthday. Thursday. Farewell to Ambleside. A happy eight days we have had here. Ms. Note-Book. Portions of a more complete narrative, based on these sketch
great apartment houses, and everlasting chatter. When that time comes, a few belated spirits will look back regretfully to the Cambridge which called itself a young city, but in its traditions was after all an overgrown village, and figures which are as yet but slightly historic will rise to the imagination as bringing the glory of true literature to overshine the town and make it one of those bright spots on the airy globe of the human spirit which is so charted as to make Concord and Ambleside more conspicuous than, let us say, Jersey City and Leeds. That fine, poetic nature who brought his sensitive English conscience to the New England, where the conscience had been more sturdily cultivated, Arthur Hugh Clough, left a tremulous track of light behind him as he tarried awhile in Cambridge, translating Plutarch, laboring and making friends with men with whom he should have continued to live, only he could not well bear transplanting. We are potted plants here in Cambridge, said
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
nd Bishop, he informs me that, since I left, his wife has given birth to a daughter, whom they have named Caroline Garrison Bishop. This is an indication of their personal regard for me. James Martineau was absent from Liverpool when I was there, and I did not see him. I was told that he is considerably prejudiced against the true anti-slavery band in this country, and sympathizes with such men as Drs. [Orville] Dewey and [Francis] Parkman. I meant to have visited Harriet [Martineau], at Ambleside, before my return; but she left for Egypt a few days before I sailed, and I missed the coveted opportunity. I saw her mother and sister at Newcastle [Lib. 16: 187]. As to the second of the American divines here mentioned, the Rev. Samuel May, jr., wrote to Mary Carpenter on July 15, 1851 (Ms.): Years ago, Dr. Parkman declared to me, and others, that no resolution, or action of any kind, about slavery, should ever go forth from the American Unitarian Association. None ever has. He has ca
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
o weapon formed against you shall prosper. Isa. 54.17. But Mr. Garrison's prediction to Father Mathew that violence and Ante, p. 256. lawlessness would stalk the land in 1850 as in 1835, had been fulfilled; and the end was not yet. A pleasurable reminder of the earlier epoch was contained in the subjoined letter, from the author of The martyr age of the United States, which crossed the ocean almost simultaneously with Thompson: Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. The Knoll, Ambleside, October 23d, 1850. Ms. my dear friend: This is just to say that if you should ere long receive £10 by the hands of my friend Ellis Gray Loring, I hope you will accept it for the Liberator, as my very humble offering in your great cause. I don't know for certain that you will get it. That depends on whether I get properly paid by an American publishing firm. I have no reason whatever to doubt their doing their duty by me. It is only that, somehow or other, such payments seldom come i
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
o consult, no popular sentiment to ascertain, no legal restrictions to bind. I regarded your father as a man of noble nature, but with concentrated views—I do not say narrow, because they were as wide as a race and included their emancipation. But in his reply to Prof. Newman there was that largeness of view and recognition of outside difficulties which we call the statesmanlike quality of mind (Ms. May 14, 1887, Geo. Jacob Holyoake to W. P. G.). Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. Ambleside, August 10, 1864. Ms. I have been thinking of you with strong sympathy for a long time past. Indeed, as you know, I always did; but I mean particularly since your precious wife's illness, and since the peculiar trial . . . of your being misunderstood and unkindly treated by old comrades and disciples who should have distrusted their own judgment rather than doubt you. . . . If there was any way in which I could publicly express my own views in the matter, I should be very glad to bear
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
it doubtful whether she could receive them. Naturally, she was one of the first persons to whom Mr. Garrison wrote on his arrival in London, and several letters were interchanged by them. Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. The Knoll, Ambleside, June 19, 1867. Ms. My dear friend: Your letter has moved me deeply. I could write sheets full; but, if I write at all, it must be very briefly, and I do wish to write with my own hand. After the months and years that my mind has been I do hope you will mend in health by your travels. I rejoice to see that you are to be greeted with honors in London. With veneration and affection, I am your old and grateful friend, H. Martineau. Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. Ambleside, June 25, 1867. Ms. My dear friend: I really cannot resist telling you how happy you have made me by the present of your likeness and that of your dear wife, and by the hearty affection of your letter. It would do me more harm to be silen
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
reshadowed. He was deeply interested in the advance proofs of her Autobiography, which Mrs. Chapman sent Maria W. Chapman. him, and as to which she frequently conferred with him during that autumn. Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. Ambleside, May 30, 1876. Ms. my dear friend: When you kindly sent me the memorial card announcing your precious wife's departure and burial, I asked our dear Mrs. Chapman to thank you on my behalf; and her latest letter brings me your response. Withr through the English Lake District followed, the region Aug. 10-15, 1877. being new to Mr. Garrison, who thoroughly appreciated its beauty, and enjoyed rowing, successively, on the placid waters of Derwentwater, Windermere, and Ullswater. At Ambleside he visited The Knoll, Harriet Martineau's Aug. 12. late home, and rejoiced to find the house occupied by sympathizing friends, who welcomed him with especial Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hills. cordiality. Little leisure remained for him in the few
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
arlyle was quite dejected for a while. At last he re-commenced it, but, Mrs. M. supposes, had not the patience to go through it again in the same painstaking way as before; and in this way she accounts, to a certain extent, for the abrupt character which it has. I once spoke of Mr. Montagu to Talfourd as a person whom I liked very much, when the author of on said: He is a humbug; he drinks no wine. Commend me to such humbugs! Miss Martineau 1802-76. Sumner visited Miss Martineau at Ambleside in 1857. She became quite impatient in later life with him and with all who maintained, as he did, the liability of England for the escape of the rebel cruisers in our civil war,—a liability which was found to exist by the award at Geneva. I see pretty often. She has been consistently kind to me; and though circumstances have made me somewhat independent of her civilities, yet I feel grateful to her, and am glad to confess that I owe to her several attentions. She is much attached to ou
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
arlyle was quite dejected for a while. At last he re-commenced it, but, Mrs. M. supposes, had not the patience to go through it again in the same painstaking way as before; and in this way she accounts, to a certain extent, for the abrupt character which it has. I once spoke of Mr. Montagu to Talfourd as a person whom I liked very much, when the author of on said: He is a humbug; he drinks no wine. Commend me to such humbugs! Miss Martineau 1802-76. Sumner visited Miss Martineau at Ambleside in 1857. She became quite impatient in later life with him and with all who maintained, as he did, the liability of England for the escape of the rebel cruisers in our civil war,—a liability which was found to exist by the award at Geneva. I see pretty often. She has been consistently kind to me; and though circumstances have made me somewhat independent of her civilities, yet I feel grateful to her, and am glad to confess that I owe to her several attentions. She is much attached to ou
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