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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
George Thompson to W. L. Garrison. London, February 27, 1863 [Feb. 26]. Ms. and Lib. 33.46. I can only send you a very imperfect acknowledgment of your letter of the 10th instant, which reached me at the house of a friend, near Manchester, on the 24th. A portion of that letter was read at the great meeting held in the Free Trade Hall, on the evening of the same day, to present an address of welcome to the captain of the Griswold. The George Griswold, a vessel sent from New York to Liverpool laden with food for the suffering Lancashire operatives—the contribution of New York merchants. I was at the same hour attending another immense gathering in the town of Huddersfield. I read parts of the same letter at a meeting last evening in London, at which an Address was presented to me by Feb. 25. some kind and partial friends. The papers I send with this Lib. 33.46, 160. will give you some account of these proceedings. It would be impossible to give you a list of all the meet
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
months, Mr. Garrison had done his utmost to insure a fitting welcome for his bosom friend; An interesting and valuable sketch of Mr. Thompson's life and philanthropic labors, by William Farmer, ran through seven numbers of the Liberator, filling eighteen columns—probably the fullest and best outline of his remarkable career that has been written (Lib. 34: 25, 29, 34, 37, 41, 45, 49). and the farewell soirees with which Thompson's admirers in London, Manchester, and Lib. 34.25, 26, 29. Liverpool had honored him, were but a prelude to the series of ovations awaiting him in the land which he had so long loved and served, and which was ready now to recognize his heroism, his sacrifices, and his magnanimity. For whereas, in 1835, he had been secretly hurried out of Ante, 2.50. Boston harbor, he was now received with special courtesies by the Customs officers of the United States, and treated as a distinguished visitor. The Collector of the port solicited J. Z. Goodrich. his presen
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
n his honor, which was repeated by the boys of the School Ship Massachusetts, who manned the yards of that vessel and gave three rousing cheers. The voyage to Liverpool was quick and uneventful. May 9-18, 1867. Mr. Garrison proceeded directly to Paris, parting with Mr. Thompson at London, and crossing the Channel, for May 20. ic radiance about it (Ms. Jan. 11, 1868, W. L. G. to H. C. Wright). and James Haughton was there from Dublin to renew the old friendship. Other friends were at Liverpool to say the parting word—George Thompson, Richard D. Webb, and Miss Estlin of Bristol among Mary A. Estlin. them. On the morning of the 25th a complimentary breakfast was given to Mr. Garrison by Mr. James R. Jeffrey, a prominent merchant of Liverpool, and the evening of the same day was spent with a delightful company at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Crosfield, the latter a niece of James Cropper. The next day Mr. Oct. 26. Garrison, with his son, sailed for home on the Java, having a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
New York on the 23d of May, F. J. G. in the steamer Algeria, they arrived in Liverpool on the 3d of June, in good condition for the twelve weeks of delightful travey. Evesham. The first person whom Mr. Garrison sought, on his arrival in Liverpool, was Mrs. Josephine E. Butler, whom he had wished to meet ever since her inaut she subsequently wrote him: Josephine E. Butler to W. L. Garrison. Liverpool, June 10, 1877. Ms. I wished one more word in reply to your most kind and a moment, though still, and more widely, beholding all that strife. From Liverpool, where he passed pleasant hours with Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Crosfield. his friends to Manchester, he hastened to spend his last two days Aug. 21-23. among his Liverpool friends. Mrs. Butler convened a special meeting of adherents at her house toend May he wrote: From the time of our departure from New York to our leaving Liverpool, everything went auspiciously with us. Our good angels seemed to be ever at o