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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 17 9 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Sheffield (United Kingdom) or search for Sheffield (United Kingdom) in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
iefly under it. . . . . September 28.—We intended to have left Wentworth House this morning, and, passing the day at Sheffield, about ten miles off, have proceeded on our journey to-morrow; but I found Lord Fitzwilliam had invited Montgomery, themall man, above sixty-five years old, rather feeble and sensitive, but good, kind, and benevolent, and greatly loved in Sheffield, where he has lived many years. He is a Moravian, and much interested in what relates to his sect and to Christianity.hatever he says, so that I was quite glad to talk with him. He told me, among other things, that Chantrey was born near Sheffield; that he knew him as quite a young man before he went to London; that he began in the country as a portrait-painter, anrly period. He told me, too, a good deal about Elliott, the author of the Corn Law rhymes, who is in the iron-trade at Sheffield, and who, it seems, has been these thirty years trying to obtain notice as a poet, but never succeeding until lately.