hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 54 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 36 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 12 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Epidamnus (Albania) or search for Epidamnus (Albania) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 2, chapter 10 (search)
f his day. After Iccus stands Pantarces the Elean, beloved of Pheidias, who beat the boys at wrestling. Next to Pantarces is the chariot of Cleosthenes, a man of Epidamnus. This is the work of Ageladas, and it stands behind the Zeus dedicated by the Greeks from the spoil of the battle of Plataea. Cleosthenes' victory occurred at thre the horses by the yoke, on the right Cnacias, on the left Samus. This inscription in elegiac verse is on the chariot :—Cleosthenes, son of Pontis, a native of Epidamnus, dedicated meAfter winning with his horses a victory in the glorious games of Zeus. This Cleosthenes was the first of those who bred horses in Greece to dedicate occupy the same territory to-day as they did at first, but the modern city is not the ancient one, being at a short distance from it. The modern city is called Dyrrhachium from its founder. Lycinus of Heraea, Epicradius of Mantineia, Tellon of Oresthas, and Agiadas of Elis won victories in boys' matches; Lycinus for running, the r
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Arcadia, chapter 40 (search)
remaining competitor, whoever he was, the latter got a grip first, and held Arrhachion, hugging him with his legs, and at the same time he squeezed his neck with his hands. Arrhachion dislocated his opponent's toe, but expired owing to suffocation; but he who suffocated Arrhachion was forced to give in at the same time because of the pain in his toe. The Eleans crowned and proclaimed victor the corpse of Arrhachion. I know that the Argives acted similarly in the case of Creugas, a boxer of Epidamnus. For the Argives too gave to Creugas after his death the crown in the Nemean games, because his opponent Damoxenus of Syracuse broke their mutual agreement. For evening drew near as they were boxing, and they agreed within the hearing of witnesses, that each should in turn allow the other to deal him a blow. At that time boxers did not yet wear a sharp thong on the wrist of each hand, but still boxed with the soft gloves, binding them in the hollow of the hand, so that their fingers might