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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 38 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 2 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 2 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 2 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the fortunate Ilands, otherwise called the Ilands of Canaria, with their strange fruits and commodities: composed by Thomas Nicols English man, who remained there the space of seven yeeres together. (search)
re declared, great store of divers sortes of fruites, as Peares, Apples, Plummes, wild Dates, Peaches of divers sortes, Mellons, Batatas, Orenges, Lemmons, Pomgranates, Citrons, Figges, and all maner of garden herbes. There are many Dragon trees, such as grow in the Canarie Ilands, but chiefly this land produceth great quantitie of singular good wines which are laden for many places. On the North side of this land three leagues distant from the maine Iland standeth another litle Iland called Porto santo: the people thereof liveth by husbandrie, for the Iland of Madera yeeldeth but litle corne, but rather is thereof provided out of France and from the Iland of Tenerif. On the East side of the Ile of Madera sixe leagues distant standeth another litle Iland called the Desert, which produceth onely Orchell, and nourisheth a great number of Goates, for the provision of the maine Iland, which may be thirtie leagues in circuit: and the land is of great heigth where the foresayd trees growe
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the Iland of Madera. (search)
re declared, great store of divers sortes of fruites, as Peares, Apples, Plummes, wild Dates, Peaches of divers sortes, Mellons, Batatas, Orenges, Lemmons, Pomgranates, Citrons, Figges, and all maner of garden herbes. There are many Dragon trees, such as grow in the Canarie Ilands, but chiefly this land produceth great quantitie of singular good wines which are laden for many places. On the North side of this land three leagues distant from the maine Iland standeth another litle Iland called Porto santo: the people thereof liveth by husbandrie, for the Iland of Madera yeeldeth but litle corne, but rather is thereof provided out of France and from the Iland of Tenerif. On the East side of the Ile of Madera sixe leagues distant standeth another litle Iland called the Desert, which produceth onely Orchell, and nourisheth a great number of Goates, for the provision of the maine Iland, which may be thirtie leagues in circuit: and the land is of great heigth where the foresayd trees growe
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Thomas Stukeley, wrongfully called Marques of Ireland, into Barbary 1578. Written by Johannes Thomas Freigius in Historia de caede Sebastiani Regis Lusitaniae. (search)
him in the warres, &c. He divided the whole Armie into 4. squadrons: upon the right wing stood the first squadron, consisting of men lightly armed or skirmishers and of the souldiers of Tangier, Generall of whom was Don Alvaro Perez de Tavara: the left or midle squadron consisted of Germanes and Italians, under the command of the Marques of Irland, &c. cap. 7. Of Noblemen were slaine in this battell (besides Don Sebastian the king) the duke de Avero, the two bishops of Coimbra & of Porto , the Marques of Irland sent by the Pope as his Commissary generall, Christopher de Tavara, and many others, cap. 13. IT is further also to be remembred, that divers other English gentlemen were in this battell, whereof the most part were slaine; and among others M. Christopher Lyster was taken captive, and was there long detained in miserable servitude. Which gentleman although at length he happily escaped the cruel hands of the Moores; yet returning home into England, and for his manifold g
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Richard Rainolds and Thomas Dassel to the rivers of Senega and Gambra adjoyning upon Guinea, 1591, with a discourse of the treasons of certain of Don Antonio his servants and followers. (search)
, and a few elephants teeth now and then. 5 Porto d'Ally, a towne 5 leagues from Palmerin: The re. 6 Candimal, a towne halfe a league from Porto d'Ally: The commodities be small hides, and a jo, and suffer us to ancre with our shippes at Porto d'Ally. The Frenchmen never use to go into theortugals and the king of the Negros consent in Porto d'Ally and Joala about forty Englishmen cruellsse to traffike with Spaniards or Portugals in Porto d'Ally or Joala. Over against the sayd Iland oand dwelleth a dayes journey and an halfe from Porto d'Ally. When we had ankered, the kings kinsmenainst Thomas Dassel and others at the towne of Porto d'Ally, where I Richard Rainolds remained, he os and Portugals were ridden post over-land to Porto d'Ally with intent to have Richard Rainolds anis pinnesse & Portugall to ride in the road of Porto d'Ally, where our great shippe the Nightingallaried to a kings daughter. In the townes of Porto d'Ally and Joala, being townes of chiefest tra[2 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
in the moneth of April following, taking their course by the Island of Jamaica, in which Island there dwell on the West side of it certeine Spanyards of no great number. From this place they go to the cape of S. Anthony, which is the uttermost part of the Westward of the Island of Cuba, and from thence to Havana lying hard by, which is the chiefest port that the king of Spaine hath in all the countreys of the Indies, and of greatest importance: for all the ships, both from Peru , Hunduras, Porto rico, S. Domingo, Jamaica , and all other places in his Indies, arrive there in their returne to Spaine, for that in this port they take in victuals and water, and the most part of their lading : here they meet from all the foresayd places alwayes in the beginning of May by the kings commandement: at the entrance of this port it is so narrow, that there can scarse come in two ships together, although it be above sixe fadome deepe in the narrowest place of it. In the North side of the comming
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A notable discourse of M. John Chilton, touching the people, maners, mines, cities, riches, forces, and other memorable things of New Spaine, and other provinces in the West Indies, seene and noted by himselfe in the time of his travels, continued in those parts, the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres. (search)
in the moneth of April following, taking their course by the Island of Jamaica, in which Island there dwell on the West side of it certeine Spanyards of no great number. From this place they go to the cape of S. Anthony, which is the uttermost part of the Westward of the Island of Cuba, and from thence to Havana lying hard by, which is the chiefest port that the king of Spaine hath in all the countreys of the Indies, and of greatest importance: for all the ships, both from Peru , Hunduras, Porto rico, S. Domingo, Jamaica , and all other places in his Indies, arrive there in their returne to Spaine, for that in this port they take in victuals and water, and the most part of their lading : here they meet from all the foresayd places alwayes in the beginning of May by the kings commandement: at the entrance of this port it is so narrow, that there can scarse come in two ships together, although it be above sixe fadome deepe in the narrowest place of it. In the North side of the comming
for the Vice-roy of new Spaine, the 20. of May, in the yere of our Lord 1579. in the citie of Mexico , from whence it was sent to the Vice-roy of the Portugall-Indies: wherein is set downe the course and actions passed in the Voyage of Sir Francis Drake that tooke the aforesayd Nuno da Silva at S. Iago one of the Islands of Cabo Verde, and caried him along with him through the Streights of Magellan, to the Haven of Guatulco in new Spaine, where he let him goe againe. NUNO DA SILVA borne in Porto , a Citizen and inhabitant of Guaia, saith, that hee departed out of his house in the beginning of November in the yeere of our Lorde 1577. taking his course to Cabo Verde, or The greene Cape, where he anchored with his Shippe close by the Haven of the Island of Sant Iago, one of the Islandes of Cabo Verde aforesayde, beeing the nineteenth of January in the yeere of our Lord 1578. And lying there, there came sixe ships, which seemed to be Englishmen, whereof the Admirall boorded his ship, an
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The relation of a Voyage made by a Pilot called Nuno da Silva for the Vice-roy of new Spaine, the 20. of May, in the yere of our Lord 1579. in the citie of Mexico , from whence it was sent to the Vice-roy of the Portugall-Indies: wherein is set downe the course and actions passed in the Voyage of Sir Francis Drake that tooke the aforesayd Nuno da Silva at S. Iago one of the Islands of Cabo Verde, and caried him along with him through the Streights of Magellan, to the Haven of Guatulco in new Spaine, where he let him goe againe. (search)
for the Vice-roy of new Spaine, the 20. of May, in the yere of our Lord 1579. in the citie of Mexico , from whence it was sent to the Vice-roy of the Portugall-Indies: wherein is set downe the course and actions passed in the Voyage of Sir Francis Drake that tooke the aforesayd Nuno da Silva at S. Iago one of the Islands of Cabo Verde, and caried him along with him through the Streights of Magellan, to the Haven of Guatulco in new Spaine, where he let him goe againe. NUNO DA SILVA borne in Porto , a Citizen and inhabitant of Guaia, saith, that hee departed out of his house in the beginning of November in the yeere of our Lorde 1577. taking his course to Cabo Verde, or The greene Cape, where he anchored with his Shippe close by the Haven of the Island of Sant Iago, one of the Islandes of Cabo Verde aforesayde, beeing the nineteenth of January in the yeere of our Lord 1578. And lying there, there came sixe ships, which seemed to be Englishmen, whereof the Admirall boorded his ship, an
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., On the road to Petersburg: notes of an officer of the C. S. A. (search)
ses his head. A gun sounds from down the river, reverberating amid the bluffs, and echoing back from the high banks around Wilton, where his friend Mr. Randolph lives. It must be the signal of a ship just arrived from London, in this month of June, 1764; the Fly-by-Night, most probably, with all the list of articles which Colonel Cary sent for-new suits for himself from the London tailors (no good ones in this colony as yet), fine silks for the ladies, wines from Madeira, and Bordeaux, and Oporto, new editions of the Tattler, or Spectator, or Tom Jones, all paid for by the tobacco crop raised here at Ampthill. The Flyby-Night probably brings also the London Gazette, showing what view is taken in England of the rising spirit of rebellion in the colonies, and what the ministers think of the doctrine of coercion. Our present Governor, Fauquier, is not wholly sound, it is thought, upon these questions, and Lord Dunmore it is supposed will succeed him. A second gun! The Captain of the
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
e modifications in an ordinary system of operations. Indeed, for being less dangerous than a distant invasion, that which assails an adjacent power has also none the less its fatal chances. A French army which should go to attack Cadiz could, although well based upon the Pyrenees, with intermediate bases on the Ebro and the Tagus, find a tomb on the Guadalquivir. In the same manner, that which in 1809 besieged Komorn in the centre of Hungary, whilst others were warring from Barcelona to Oporto, might have succumbed in the plains of Wagram, without having any need of going so far as the Beresina. The antecedents, the number of disposable troops, the successes already gained, the state of the country, all have an influence upon the latitude which may be given to one's enterprises; the great talent of the general will be to proportion them to his means and to circumstances. With regard to the part which policy might exercise in those neighboring invasions, if it be true that it is
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