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Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 9 For Epharmostus of Opus Wrestling-Match 466 B. C. (search)
silver bow; nor did Hades keep his staff unmoved, with which he leads mortal bodies down to the hollow pathof the dead. My mouth, fling this story away from me! Since to speak evil of the gods is a hateful skill, and untimely boasting is in harmony with madness.Do not babble of such things now. Keep war and all battles apart from the immortals. But lend your tongue to the city of Protogeneia, where, by the ordinance of Zeus with the flashing thunderbolt, Pyrrha and Deucalion came down from Parnassus and made their first home, and without the marriage-bedthey founded a unified race of stone offspring, and the stones gave the people their namePun on lao\'dy, “people”, and lh/qoi, “stones.”. Arouse for them a clear-sounding path Reading with Snell and MSS oi)=mon for ou)=ron. of song; praise wine that is old, but praise the flowers of songs that are new. They tell, indeed,how the strength of the waters overwhelmed the dark earth; but by the skills of Zeus the ebbing tide suddenly drain
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 13 For Xenophon of Corinth Foot Race and Pentathlon 464 B. C. (search)
and, as a truthful witness under oath,the sweet-tongued cry of the noble herald, who announced their victories sixty times at both places, will confirm my words. Their victories at Olympia seem to have already been mentioned; and of those in the future I could tell clearly when the time comes. For now I am hopeful, although a god controlsthe outcome. If the good fortune of their family continues, we shall leave this to Zeus and Enyalius to accomplish. They won six times beneath the brow of Parnassus; and all their victories in Argos and in Thebes, and all that shall be witnessed by the royal Lycaean altar that rules over the Arcadians, and by Pellana, and Sicyon, and Megara, the beautifully enclosed precinct of the Aeacidae,and Eleusis and splendid Marathon, and the wealthy and beautiful cities beneath the high crest of Aetna, and Euboea—you may search through all Greece, and you will find that their victories are more than the eye can see. Come, swim away with agile feet!Zeus the Acc
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 1 For Hieron of Aetna Chariot Race 470 B. C. (search)
na, announcing Hieron's triumph with the chariot. For seafaring men, the first blessing at the outset of their voyage is a favorable wind; for then it is likely thatat the end as well they will win a more prosperous homecoming. And that saying, in these fortunate circumstances, brings the belief that from now on this city will be renowned for garlands and horses, and its name will be spoken amid harmonious festivities. Phoebus, lord of Lycia and Delos, you who love the Castalian spring of Parnassus,may you willingly put these wishes in your thoughts, and make this a land of fine men. All the resources for the achievements of mortal excellence come from the gods; for being skillful, or having powerful arms, or an eloquent tongue. As for me, in my eagerness to praise that man, I hope that I may not be like one who hurls the bronze-cheeked javelin, which I brandish in my hand, outside the course,but that I may make a long cast, and surpass my rivals. Would that all of time may, in this
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 8 For Aristomenes of Aegina Wrestling 446 B. C. (search)
w your power, when he provoked you beyond all measure. Gain is most welcome, when one takes it from the home of a willing giver. Violence trips up even a man of great pride, in time. Cilician Typhon with his hundred heads did not escape you, nor indeed did the king of the Giants.Porphyrion, mentioned above. One was subdued by the thunderbolt, the other by the bow of Apollo, who with a gracious mind welcomed the son of Xenarces on his return from Cirrha, crowned witha garland of laurel from Parnassus and with Dorian victory-song. His island with her just city has not fallen far from the Graces, having attained the famous excellence of the Aeacidae; she has had perfectglory from the beginning. She is praised in song for having fostered heroes who were supreme in many victory-bearing contests and in swift battles; and she is distinguished in these things even for her men. But I do not have the time to set uptheir whole long story to the lyre and the gentle voice, for fear that satiety wo
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 10 For Hippocleas of Thessaly Boys« Double Foot Race 498 B. C. (search)
Pythian 10 For Hippocleas of Thessaly Boys« Double Foot Race 498 B. C. Lacedaemon is prosperous; Thessaly is divinely blessed. Both are ruled by the race of a single ancestor, Heracles, the best in battle. Why do I make this untimely boast? Because Pytho summons me, and Pelinna,and the sons of Aleuas; they want me to present to Hippocleas the glorious voices of men in celebration. For he is trying his hand at contests, and the gorge of Parnassus proclaimed him to the people that live around as the greatest of the boys in the double-course footrace.Apollo, the end and the beginning both grow sweet when a god urges on a man«s work. No doubt he accomplished this with the help of your counsels. Kinship has stepped into the footprints of the father, who was twice an Olympic victor in the war-enduring armor of Ares;and the contest in the deep meadow that stretches beneath the rock of Cirrha made Phricias victorious in the race. May a good fate follow them in their future days as well, s
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 11 For Thrasydaeus of Thebes Foot Race or Double Foot Race 474 or 454 B. C. (search)
talk. Citizens are apt to speak evil, for prosperity brings with it envy as great as itself.But the man who breathes close to the ground roars unseen. He himself died, the heroic son of Atreus, when at last he returned to famous Amyclae, and he caused the destruction of the prophetic girl, when he had robbed of their opulent treasures the houses of the Trojans, set on fire for Helen«s sake. And his young son went to the friend of the family, the old manStrophius, who dwelled at the foot of Parnassus. But at last, with the help of Ares, he killed his mother and laid Aegisthus low in blood. My friends, I was whirled off the track at a shifting fork in the road, although I had been traveling on a straight path before. Or did some wind throw me off course,like a skiff on the sea? Muse, it is your task, if you undertook to lend your voice for silver, to let it flit now this way, now that: now to the father, who was a Pythian victor, now to his son Thrasydaeus.Their joyfulness and renown sh
Pindar, Nemean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Nemean 2 For Timodemus of Acharnae Pancratium ?485 B. C. (search)
at guides him straight along the path of his fathers has given him as an adornment to great Athens, it must be that the son of Timonous will often reap the finest bloom of the Isthmian games, and be victorious in the Pythian contests.It is right for Orion to travel not far from the mountain Pleiades. And certainly Salamis can raise a warrior. In Troy Hector heard of Aias. And you, Timodemus, are exaltedby your enduring spirit of valor in the pancratium. Acharnae has long been famous for fine men. And in everything that has to do with contests, the sons of Timodemus are proclaimed the most outstanding. Beside Parnassus, ruling on high, they carried off four victories in the games,while the men of Corinth have already given them eight garlands in the glades of noble Pelops; in the Nemean contest of Zeus they have won seven times, and at home their victories are countless. Citizens, praise Zeus in a victory procession for Timodemus' glorious homecoming.Begin with a sweet-singing voice!
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 1137 (search)
Chorus Thebes of all cities you hold foremost in honor, together with your lightning-struck mother.And now when the whole city is held subject to a violent plague, come, we ask, with purifying feet over steep Parnassus,or over the groaning straits!
Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 473 (search)
ChorusRecently the message has flashed forth from snowy Parnassusordering all to search for the unknown man. He wanders under cover of the wild wood, among caves and rocks, fierce as a bull, wretched and forlorn on his joyless path, still seeking to separate himself from the doom revealed at the central shrine of the earth.But that doom lives forever, forever flits around him.
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 19, line 7 (search)
ykos, "call the child thus: I am highly displeased with a large number of people in one place and another, both men and women; so name the child ‘Odysseus,’ or the child of anger. When he grows up and comes to visit his mother's family on Mount Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him a present and will send him on his way rejoicing." Odysseus, therefore, went to Parnassus to get the presents from Autolykos, who with his sons shook hands with him and gave him welcome. His grandmothParnassus to get the presents from Autolykos, who with his sons shook hands with him and gave him welcome. His grandmother Amphithea threw her arms about him, and kissed his head, and both his beautiful eyes, while Autolykos desired his sons to get dinner ready, and they did as he told them. They brought in a five year old bull, flayed it, made it ready and divided it into joints; these they then cut carefully up into smaller pieces and spitted them; they roasted them sufficiently and served the portions round. Thus through the livelong day to the going down of the sun they feasted, and every man had his full sh
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