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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the Susan of London to Constantinople, wherein the worshipfull M. William Harborne was sent first Ambassadour unto Sultan Murad Can, the great Turke, with whom he continued as her Majesties Ligier almost sixe yeeres. (search)
Iland called Cephalonia : it is an out Iland in the dominions of Grecia , and now at this present governed by the Signory of Venice, as the rest of Grecia is under the Turke, for the most part. The 27 we came from thence, and that day arrived at Zante which is also in Grecia : for at this present wee entred the parts of Grecia . The second of March we came from Zante ; and the same day were thwart of an Iland called Prodeno: and the 4 we were thwart of an Iland called Sapientia. There standethZante ; and the same day were thwart of an Iland called Prodeno: and the 4 we were thwart of an Iland called Sapientia. There standeth a faire Towne and a Castle on the maine over against it, called Modon . The same day by reason of contrary windes we put backe againe to Prodeno, because we could not fetch Sapientia. The ninth we came from thence, and were as farre as Sapientia againe. The tenth we were as farre shot as Cavo Matapan; and that day we entred the Archipelago, and passed thorow betweene Cerigo and Cavo Malio. This Cerigo is an Iland where one Menelaus did sometimes reigne, from whome was stollen by Paris faire
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage made to Tripolis in Barbarie, in the yeere 1583. with a ship called the Jesus, wherein the adventures and distresses of some Englishmen are truely reported, and other necessary circumstances observed. Written by Thomas Sanders. (search)
ton, with all the residue of his company, departed from Tripolie to Zante , in a vessell, called a Settea, of one Marcus Segoorus, who dwelt in Zante , and after our arrivall at Zante wee remained fifteene dayes there aboorde our vessell, before wee coulde have Platego (that is, leaZante wee remained fifteene dayes there aboorde our vessell, before wee coulde have Platego (that is, leave to come a shoare) because the plague was in that place, from whence wee came: and about three dayes after we came a shoare, thither came and went to Constantinople. But the other nine of us that remained in Zante , about three moneths after, shipt our selves in a shippe of the said Marcus Segoorus, which came to Zante , and was bound for England. In which three moneths, the souldiers of Tripolie killed the said king. Annd in this meane time we had one more of our company, which died in Zante , and afterward the other eight shipped themselves at Zante , in a sZante , in a shippe of the said Marcus Segorus, which was bound for England: and before we departed thence, there arrived the Assension, and the George Bona
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage of M. Laurence Aldersey, to the Cities of Alexandria, and Cayro in Ægypt. Anno 1586. (search)
ill we were out of sight of the Castle of Malta. The 9 day of Aprill we came to Zante , and being before the towne, William Aldridge, servant to Master Thomas Corda some of it away with me. Upon Tuesday in Easter weeke, wee set out towards Zante againe, and the 24. of April with much adoe, wee were all permitted to come on shoare, and I was caried to the English house in Zante , where I was very well entertained. The commodities of Zante are Currans and oyle: the situation of the TowneZante are Currans and oyle: the situation of the Towne is under a very great hill, upon which standeth a very strong Castle, which commaundeth the Towne. At Zante we tooke in a Captaine and 16. soldiers, with other passengers. Wee departed from Zante upon Tuesday the 15. of April, and the next day we ankered at a small Island, called Strivalaia, which is desolate of people, saving are wee set the Captaine, Souldiers, and Mariners ashoare, which wee tooke in at Zante , with all their carriage. The second day of May wee set saile againe, and th
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true report of a worthy fight, performed in the voyage from Turkie, by five Ships of London, against 11. Gallies, and two Frigats of the King of Spaines, at Pantalarea within the Streights, Anno, 1586. Written by Philip Jones. (search)
heir severall portes. And in conclusion, the generall agreement was to meete at Zante , an Island neere to the maine continent of the West part of Morea , well knowenche side, and promised, that whatsoever ship of these 5. should first arrive at Zante , should there stay and expect the comming of the rest of the fleete, for the spgood weather, that she first of al the rest came back to the appointed place of Zante , and not forgetting the former conclusion, did there cast ancre, attending the together with the William and John came from Tripolie in Syria , and arrived at Zante within the compasse of the foresaide time limitted. These ships in token of thee supplied, and nothing wanted to set out for their returne. In this port of Zante , the newes was fresh and currant, of two severall armies and fleetes provided bof the hope of the ambitious and proud enemie. Thus in good order they left Zante and the Castle of Graecia, and committed themselves againe to the Seas, and pro
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second letters Patents graunted by the Queenes Majestic to the Right worshipfull companie of the English Marchants for the Levant , the seventh of Januarie 1592. (search)
, builded and furnished diverse good and serviceable shippes and therewith to their like costs and charges have traded and frequented, and from time to time doe trade and frequent and traffike by sea with the commodities of our Realme to Venice , Zante , Candie, and Zephalonia and other the dominions of the Segniorie and State of Venice, and thereby have made and mainteyned, and doe make and continually maintaine divers good shippes with mariners skilfull and fitte and necessarie for our servicemay by the space of twelve yeeres from the day of the date of these our letters Patents freely traffike, and use the trade of Marchandize as well by sea as by lande into and from the dominions of the sayde Grand Signor, and into and from Venice , Zante , Candie and Zephalonia, and other the dominions of the Signiorie and State of Venice, and also by lande through the Countries of the sayde Grand Signor into and from the East India, lately discovered by John Newberie, Ralph Fitch, William Leech,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of a Voiage to Constantinople and Syria , begun the 21. of March 1593. and ended the 9. of August, 1595. wherein is shewed the order of delivering the second Present by Master Edward Barton her majesties Ambassador, which was sent from her Majestie to Sultan Murad Can, Emperour of Turkie. (search)
Your loving Nephew Richard Wrag. WE set saile in the Ascension of London, a new shippe very well appointed, of two hundred and three score tunnes (whereof was master one William Broadbanke, a provident and skilfull man in his facultie) from Gravesend the one and twentie of March 1593. And upon the eight of Aprill folowing wee passed the streights of Gibraltar , and with a small Westerne gale, the 24. of the same, we arrived at Zante an Iland under the Venetians. The fourth of May wee departed, and the one and twentie wee arrived at Alexandretta in Cilicia in the very bottome of the Mediterrane sea, a roade some 25. miles distant from Antioch , where our marchants land their goods to bee sent for Aleppo. From thence wee set saile the fift of June, and by contrary windes were driven upon the coast of Caramania into a road neere a litle Iland where a castle standeth, called Castle Rosso, some thirtie leagues to the Eastw
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The casting away of the Tobie neere Cape Espartel corruptly called Cape Sprat without the Straight of Gibraltar on the coast of Barbarie. 1593. (search)
The casting away of the Tobie neere Cape Espartel corruptly called Cape Sprat without the Straight of Gibraltar on the coast of Barbarie. 1593.THE Tobie of London a ship of 250 tunnes manned with fiftie men, the owner whereof was the worshipfull M. Richard Staper, being bound for Livorno , Zante and Patras in Morea , being laden with marchandize to the value of 11 or 12 thousand pounds sterling, set sayle from Black-wall the 16 day of August 1593, and we went thence to Portesmouth where we tooke in great quantitie of wheate, and set sayle foorth of Stokes bay in the Isle of Wight, the 6. day of October, the winde being faire: and the 16 of the same moneth we were in the heigth of Cape S. Vincent, where on the next morning we descried a sayle which lay in try right a head off us, to which we gave chase with very much winde, the sayle being a Spaniard, which wee found in fine so good of sayle that we were faine to leave her and give her over. Two dayes after this we had sight of mount
ady, and well manned our pinnesses; but being upon the way going, the generall called them backe, and would not suffer them to goe. There were three of their boats also going for them from their ships; at whom I shot, and made them to retire, and leave them upon the shrowds. At length our generall sent for two of the men away: which his pinnesse brought to him; the one was heaved over boord, because he was sore hurt, not like to live; and he was a Marsillian; the other was a Greeke, borne in Zante , boatswaine of the viceadmirall: the rest of the men, some swam away upon rafts, some were drowned, and some remained still hanging on her. By this time it was faire day-light, and I called to our generall to wey, and drive downe to them, who required mee to goe first and anker on their quarter, and he would follow, and anker on their bowes. I weyed, and went downe, and ankered by them; yet not so nere as I meant, for the ebbe put me off to the Northwards. There rid I alone, spending shot
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage intended towards China , wherein M. Edward Fenton was appointed Generall: Written by M. Luke Ward his Viceadmiral, and Captaine of the Edward Bonaventure, begun Anno Dom. 1582. (search)
ady, and well manned our pinnesses; but being upon the way going, the generall called them backe, and would not suffer them to goe. There were three of their boats also going for them from their ships; at whom I shot, and made them to retire, and leave them upon the shrowds. At length our generall sent for two of the men away: which his pinnesse brought to him; the one was heaved over boord, because he was sore hurt, not like to live; and he was a Marsillian; the other was a Greeke, borne in Zante , boatswaine of the viceadmirall: the rest of the men, some swam away upon rafts, some were drowned, and some remained still hanging on her. By this time it was faire day-light, and I called to our generall to wey, and drive downe to them, who required mee to goe first and anker on their quarter, and he would follow, and anker on their bowes. I weyed, and went downe, and ankered by them; yet not so nere as I meant, for the ebbe put me off to the Northwards. There rid I alone, spending shot
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