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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 92 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 18 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 10 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Lysistrata (ed. Jack Lindsay) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Zacynthus (Greece) or search for Zacynthus (Greece) in all documents.

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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Notes in writing, besides more privie by mouth, that were given by M. Richard Hakluyt of Eiton in the Countie of Hereford, Esquire, Anno 1580: to M. Arthur Pet, and to M. Charles Jackman, sent by the Merchants of the Moscovie companie for the discovery of the Northeast straight, not altogether unfit for some other enterprises of discovery, hereafter to be taken in hand. (search)
Comfets of divers kinds made of purpose by him that is most excellent, that shal not dissolve. Prunes damaske. Dried Peares. Walnuts. Almonds. Olives to make them taste their wine. The apple John that dureth two yeeres to make shew of our fruits. Hullocke. Sacke. Vials of good sweet waters, and casting bottels of glasses to besprinkle the ghests withall, after their comming aboord. Suger to use with their wine if they will. The sweet oyle of Zante , and excellent French vineger, and a fine kind of Bisket stieped in the same do make a banketting dish, and a little Sugar cast in it cooleth and comforteth, and refresheth the spirits of man. Cynamon water, Imperiall water is to be had with you to make a shew of by taste, and also to comfort your sicke in the voyage. With these and such like, you may banket where you arrive the greater and best persons. Or with the gift of these Marmelades in small boxes, or small vials of sweet wat
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, For banketting on shipboord persons of credite. (search)
Comfets of divers kinds made of purpose by him that is most excellent, that shal not dissolve. Prunes damaske. Dried Peares. Walnuts. Almonds. Olives to make them taste their wine. The apple John that dureth two yeeres to make shew of our fruits. Hullocke. Sacke. Vials of good sweet waters, and casting bottels of glasses to besprinkle the ghests withall, after their comming aboord. Suger to use with their wine if they will. The sweet oyle of Zante , and excellent French vineger, and a fine kind of Bisket stieped in the same do make a banketting dish, and a little Sugar cast in it cooleth and comforteth, and refresheth the spirits of man. Cynamon water, Imperiall water is to be had with you to make a shew of by taste, and also to comfort your sicke in the voyage. With these and such like, you may banket where you arrive the greater and best persons. Or with the gift of these Marmelades in small boxes, or small vials of sweet wat
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Roger Bodenham with the great Barke Aucher to Candia and Chio, in the yeere 1550. (search)
and, they are good archers, every one with his bowe and arrowes, a sword and a dagger, with long haire, and bootes that reach up to their grine, and a shirt of male, hanging the one halfe before, and the other halfe behinde, these were sent away againe assoone as the armie was past. They would drinke wine out of all measure. Then the armie being past, I laded my shippe with wines and other things: and so after I had that which I left in Chio, I departed for Messina . In the way I found about Zante , certaine Galliots of Turkes, laying abord of certaine vessels of Venice laden with Muscatels : I rescued them, and had but a barrell of wine for my powder and shot: and within a few dayes after I came to Messina . I had in my shippe a Spanish pilot called Noblezia, which I tooke in at Cades at my comming foorth: he went with me all this voyage into the Levant without wages, of good will that he bare me and the shippe, he stoode me in good steede untill I came backe againe to Cades, and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. John Locke to Jerusalem. (search)
winde scanted, and wee minded to have gone to Zante , but we could not for that night. This Iland of Zante is distant from Cephalonia , 12 or 14 miles, but the towne of Cephalonia , from the towne of Zante , is distant fortie miles. This night we went but little forward. The 30 day we remainede entered the channell betweene Cephalonia , & Zante , the which chanell is about eight or tenne milWest and by North from the other. The towne of Zante lieth within a point of the land, where we came to the Emperour´╝ë went from Rome, and came to Zante , and there buried his head and arme, and wrotete, which is the Turkes, and is ten miles from Zante , it did belong to the Venetians, but they have we bare into the sea, because we had newes at Zante of twelve of the Turkes gallies, that came froand shoot neere the marke. This Ilande is from Zante 300 miles. The seventh we sayled all along thrke. This night we ankred afore the towne of Zante , where we that night went on land, and rested
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage or journey, made by Master Laurence Aldersey, Marchant of London, to the Cities of Jerusa lem, and Tripolis, &c. In the yeere 1581. Penned and set downe by himselfe. (search)
ose litle of our way: and while both he, and all of us were in our dumps, God sent us a merry gale of winde, that we ranne threescore and tenne leagues before it was twelve a clocke the next day, and in sixe dayes after we were seven leagues past Zante . And upon Munday morning, being the three and twentie of the same moneth, we came in the sight of Candia which day the winde came contrary, with great blasts, and stormes, untill the eight and twentie of the same moneth: in which time, the Marin 11 day of October we were boorded with foure gallies, manned with 1200 men, which also made a sleevelesse arrant, and troubled us very much, but our captaines pasport, and the gift of 100 chekins discharged all. The 27 of October we passed by Zante with a merrie winde, the 29 by Corfu , and the third of November we arrived at Istria , and there we left our great ship, and tooke small boates to bring us to Venice . The 9 of November I arrived again at Venice in good health, where I staie
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Remembrances for master S. to give him the better occasion to informe himselfe of some things in England, and after of some other things in Turkie, to the great profite of the Common weale of this Countrey. Written by the foresayd master Richard Hakluyt, for a principall English Factor at Constantinople 1582. (search)
brought into England from Vienna in Austria divers kinds of flowers called Tulipas, and those and other procured thither a little before from Constantinople by an excellent man called M. Carolus Clusius. And it is sayd that since we traded to Zante that the plant that beareth the Coren is also brought into this realme from thence: and although it bring not fruit to perfection, yet it may serve for pleasure and for some use, like as our vines doe, which we cannot well spare, although the cliTabacco hath bene brought hither out of the West Indies, it groweth heere, and with the herbe many have bene eased of the reumes, &c. Each one of a great number of things were woorthy of a journey to be made into Spaine, Italy , Barbarie, Egypt , Zante , Constantinople, the West Indies, and to divers other places neerer and further off then any of these, yet forasmuch as the poore are not able, and for that the rich setled at home in quiet will not, therefore we are to make sute to such as repai
brought into England from Vienna in Austria divers kinds of flowers called Tulipas, and those and other procured thither a little before from Constantinople by an excellent man called M. Carolus Clusius. And it is sayd that since we traded to Zante that the plant that beareth the Coren is also brought into this realme from thence: and although it bring not fruit to perfection, yet it may serve for pleasure and for some use, like as our vines doe, which we cannot well spare, although the cliTabacco hath bene brought hither out of the West Indies, it groweth heere, and with the herbe many have bene eased of the reumes, &c. Each one of a great number of things were woorthy of a journey to be made into Spaine, Italy , Barbarie, Egypt , Zante , Constantinople, the West Indies, and to divers other places neerer and further off then any of these, yet forasmuch as the poore are not able, and for that the rich setled at home in quiet will not, therefore we are to make sute to such as repai
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the Susan of London to Constantinople, wherein the worshipfull M. William Harborne was sent first Ambassadour unto Sultan Murad Can, the great Turke, with whom he continued as her Majesties Ligier almost sixe yeeres. (search)
Iland called Cephalonia : it is an out Iland in the dominions of Grecia , and now at this present governed by the Signory of Venice, as the rest of Grecia is under the Turke, for the most part. The 27 we came from thence, and that day arrived at Zante which is also in Grecia : for at this present wee entred the parts of Grecia . The second of March we came from Zante ; and the same day were thwart of an Iland called Prodeno: and the 4 we were thwart of an Iland called Sapientia. There standethZante ; and the same day were thwart of an Iland called Prodeno: and the 4 we were thwart of an Iland called Sapientia. There standeth a faire Towne and a Castle on the maine over against it, called Modon . The same day by reason of contrary windes we put backe againe to Prodeno, because we could not fetch Sapientia. The ninth we came from thence, and were as farre as Sapientia againe. The tenth we were as farre shot as Cavo Matapan; and that day we entred the Archipelago, and passed thorow betweene Cerigo and Cavo Malio. This Cerigo is an Iland where one Menelaus did sometimes reigne, from whome was stollen by Paris faire
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage made to Tripolis in Barbarie, in the yeere 1583. with a ship called the Jesus, wherein the adventures and distresses of some Englishmen are truely reported, and other necessary circumstances observed. Written by Thomas Sanders. (search)
ton, with all the residue of his company, departed from Tripolie to Zante , in a vessell, called a Settea, of one Marcus Segoorus, who dwelt in Zante , and after our arrivall at Zante wee remained fifteene dayes there aboorde our vessell, before wee coulde have Platego (that is, leaZante wee remained fifteene dayes there aboorde our vessell, before wee coulde have Platego (that is, leave to come a shoare) because the plague was in that place, from whence wee came: and about three dayes after we came a shoare, thither came and went to Constantinople. But the other nine of us that remained in Zante , about three moneths after, shipt our selves in a shippe of the said Marcus Segoorus, which came to Zante , and was bound for England. In which three moneths, the souldiers of Tripolie killed the said king. Annd in this meane time we had one more of our company, which died in Zante , and afterward the other eight shipped themselves at Zante , in a sZante , in a shippe of the said Marcus Segorus, which was bound for England: and before we departed thence, there arrived the Assension, and the George Bona
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage of M. Laurence Aldersey, to the Cities of Alexandria, and Cayro in Ægypt. Anno 1586. (search)
ill we were out of sight of the Castle of Malta. The 9 day of Aprill we came to Zante , and being before the towne, William Aldridge, servant to Master Thomas Corda some of it away with me. Upon Tuesday in Easter weeke, wee set out towards Zante againe, and the 24. of April with much adoe, wee were all permitted to come on shoare, and I was caried to the English house in Zante , where I was very well entertained. The commodities of Zante are Currans and oyle: the situation of the TowneZante are Currans and oyle: the situation of the Towne is under a very great hill, upon which standeth a very strong Castle, which commaundeth the Towne. At Zante we tooke in a Captaine and 16. soldiers, with other passengers. Wee departed from Zante upon Tuesday the 15. of April, and the next day we ankered at a small Island, called Strivalaia, which is desolate of people, saving are wee set the Captaine, Souldiers, and Mariners ashoare, which wee tooke in at Zante , with all their carriage. The second day of May wee set saile againe, and th
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