hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 782 results in 265 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
of King Leopold at Ostend, 424; given degrees, 424, 425; visits America on a lecturing tour, 425; travels over the United States and Canada, 425-428; dines at the Press Club, New York, 426; newspaper comments on his personal appearance, 426; visits New Orleans, 426, 427; feels lack of freedom, 427, 428; returns to England, 428; lectures in England, 429; longs for rest, 429, 432; his reading, 429; on the Welsh language, 430; his reception at Carnarvon, 431; on Canterbury, 432, 433; visits Switzerland, 433; breaks his ankle, 434; visits King Leopold at Ostend, 434; his visit to Australia, etc., 434-438; letter to, from Sir George Grey, 436, 437. Consents to become candidate for Parliament, 439; defeated, 439; his speeches on second candidacy, 440-442; his disgust at electioneering methods, 443, 444; on Beauregard, Lee, and Grant, 445; on Mackinnon and the East African Company, 446-449; on East Anglia and Yarmouth, 450-452; on Norwich, 452; his enjoyment of solitude by the sea, 453;
the defeat of war into the victory of citizenship in peace, once saying: What else could be expected of a people in whose veins commingled the blood of the proud cavaliers of England, the blood of those devout and resolute men who protested against the grinding exactions of the Stuarts; the blood of the stalwart Dissenters and of the heroic Highlanders of Scotland, and of the sturdy Presbyterians of Ireland; the blood of those defenders of freedom who came from the mountain battlements of Switzerland, whose signal lights summoned her people to gather to their breasts the armfuls of spears to make way for liberty. It was a great battle-line of Puritan, of Huguenot, of Protestant, of Catholic, of Teuton, and Celt — every nation and every religion throwing its sacrifice on the altar of civilization. The causes of the American Civil War will always be subject to academic controversy, each side arguing conscientiously from its own viewpoint. It is unnecessary to linger in these pages
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
nt-Colonel J. A. Ellet, in command of the Lancaster, with his nephew, Charles Rivers Ellet, in command of the Switzer-land, chose a time near daylight for the attempt. These Ellets were all brave fellows and were full of the spirit of adventure, said Admiral Porter. Scorning the cover of darkness, they got abreast of the batteries, which promptly opened on them in a thundering chorus. A shell exploded the boilers of the Lancaster and she went to pieces and sank almost immediately. The Switzerland had her boilers perforated by a plunging shot and received other injuries, but she got through; and in her and in other of the Ellet rams, Charles Rivers Ellet performed other distinguished services. The General Price, a captive by the Ellet rams Charles Rivers Ellet must possess speed. As the class of monitors improved in size and power they rated among the fastest steam vessels afloat. The Monadnock and the Miantonomoh, the final types, could reach the then wonderful speed of
er thread of railway, guarded at every bridge, siding, and trestle, was reeled off as fast as Sherman fought on southward, until at last he reached the prize and paused again to draw breath, rations, and clothing at Atlanta before determining the next move. And then, as in the Eastern armies, there loomed up still another factor in the problems of the campaign—a factor that European writers and critics seem rarely to take into account. From the days of the Roman Empire, Italy, France, Switzerland, and even England were seamed with admirable highways. The campaigns of Turenne, of Frederick the Great, of Napoleon were planned and marched over the best of roads, firm and hard, high and dry. The campaigns of Grant, Lee, Sherman, Johnston, Sheridan, Stuart, Thomas, Hood, Hooker, Burnside, and Jackson were ploughed at times Letters from home—the army mail wagon How the soldiers got their letters from home Letters from home were a great factor in keeping up the morale of the ar
m, Baden, November 18, 1824, and was graduated from the Military School at Carlsruhe, becoming a champion of German unity and minister of war to the revolutionary Government of 1848, which was overthrown by Prussia. Later, having withdrawn to Switzerland, the Government expelled him, and he emigrated to America in 1852. He taught in a military institute in St. Louis and edited a military periodical. When the Civil War broke out, he organized the Third Missouri Infantry and an artillery batte 1902. Major-General Carl Schurz was born in Cologne, Prussia, March 2, 1829, studying there in the gymnasium and later at the University of Bonn. He was engaged in the revolutionary movement in 1848, and was compelled to seek refuge in Switzerland. In 1852, he came to the United States and settled in Philadelphia, later going to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he began the practice of law. Lincoln appointed him United States minister to Spain, but he resigned to take part in the Civil War.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
ld look out on the blue Ontario, or across the narrow river and see the flag of the United States floating from Fort Niagara, as a perpetual warning that there were sentinals watching the border and forbidding his return to the people and the State he loved so well. In August, 1866, he again went to Europe, taking his family with him, except his two eldest sons, and remained abroad nearly two years. His residence was chiefly in Paris, though he spent some time in England, visiting also Switzerland and Italy. He also made a trip to Egypt and the Holy Land. Returning to Canada in the fall of 1868, he found the sectional feeling so far abated that his friends counseled his return to Kentucky, and in the succeeding winter, having received assurances that he would not be molested, he returned to New York. His arrival in Kentucky, shortly afterwards, was hailed with every demonstration of affection by his former neighbors, irrespective of antecedents, and with cordial welcome by the w
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XX (search)
nce with Mr. Bigelow during that time, and knew that my views, as communicated to Mr. Seward and General Grant, were in close accord with his, although I could not know anything of Mr. Bigelow's despatches to the State Department until they were published. Mr. Bigelow's comprehension of the French view of the Mexican question proved to be perfectly exact. While awaiting further instructions in reply to my report of January 24, I occupied my time in visits to the south of France, Italy, Switzerland, and England. Among the personal incidents connected with my stay in Paris which seem worthy of record were the following: Soon after my arrival in Paris, in company with Mr. Bigelow I called upon Marshal Randon, Minister of War, who was the only minister of the French government then in Paris. We were received with cold and formal politeness. Some days later, the Emperor having returned to Paris, and having apparently become satisfied that I was not occupied with any designs host
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Index (search)
89; interviews with Adm. Reno, 389; reports progress to the government, 389-393; end of his mission to France, 391-393; presented to the French Emperor, 392; journeys through France, 392; hospitalities to, in Paris and London, 392, 393; visits Switzerland, 392; visits Rome and Florence, 393; presented to the Prince of Wales, 393; returns to the United States, 393; on the Fourteenth Amendment, 394; assigned to command the Department of the Potomac, 394; at Richmond, 395, 397, 400; appointed to c the South under reconstruction, 396 et seq., 419, 420; universal, 519, 520 Sullivan's Island, S. C., S.'s service at, 17-19; Southern hospitality on, 18, 19 Supply and demand, the law of, 533, 534 Survival of the fittest, the, 438 Switzerland, S. visits, 392 Tactics. See military strategy and tactics. Tampa, Fla., military operations at, 23 Telegraphic code. See cipher despatches; military telegrams, etc. Tennessee, importance of combining with Missouri and Arkansas in a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Robert, 1815-1886 (search)
Allen, Robert, 1815-1886 Military officer; born in Ohio, about 1815; was graduated at West Point in 1836, and served with distinction in the war with Mexico. He was a very useful officer in the Civil War, and attained the rank of brigadier-general, and brevet major-general of volunteers. He was stationed at St. Louis, where his services were of great value during the war. At its close he was made assistant quartermaster-general (1866), and afterwards chief-quartermaster of the division of the Pacific. He died in Switzerland, Aug. 6, 1886.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blenker, Louis, 1812-1863 (search)
Blenker, Louis, 1812-1863 Military officer; born in Worms, Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, July 31, 1812; was one of the Bavarian Legion. raised to accompany King Otho to Greece. In 1848-49, he became a leader of the revolutionists, and finally fled to Switzerland. Ordered to leave that country ( September, 1849). he came to the United States. At the beginning of the Civil War he raised a regiment, and, early in July, 1861, was put at the head of a brigade, chiefly of Germans. In the Army of the Potomac he commanded a division for a while, which was sent to western Virginia, and participated in the battle of cross Keys (q. v.). He died in Rockland county, N. Y., Oct. 31, 1863.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...