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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 12, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
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ave him excused, for he durst not meddle with me, & prayed me therefore to returne from whence I came. Which when I perceived, with a sorowful heart, God knoweth, I tooke my leave of him, not without watry cheekes. And then I went to S. Mary port, which is 3. leagues from S. Lucar, where I put my selfe to be a souldier to goe in the king of Spaines Gallies, which were bound for Majorca , and comming thither in the end of the Christmas holidayes, I found there two English ships, the one of London , and the other of the West countrey, which were ready fraighted and stayed but for a faire wind. To the Master of the one, which was of the West countrey went I, and told him that I had bene 2. yeeres in Spaine to learne the language, and that I was now desirous to goe home and see my friends, for that I lacked maintenance: and so having agreed with him for my passage, I tooke shipping. And thus through the providence of Almighty God, after 16. yeeres absence, having sustained many and sund
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The travailes of Job Hortop, which Sir John Hawkins set on land within the Bay of Mexico, after his departure from the Haven of S. John de Ullua in Nueva Espanna, the 8. of October 1568. (search)
of God (whom the sacred Scriptures tell us, to have dwelt in the land of Hus) that man being borne of a woman, living a short time, is replenished with many miseries: which some know by reading of histories, many by the view of others calamities, and I by experience in my selfe, as this present Treatise insuing shall shew. It is not unknowen unto many, that I Job Hortop pouder-maker was borne at Bourne , a towne in Lincolnshire , from my age of twelve yeeres brought up in Redriffe neere London , with M. Francis Lee, who was the Queenes Majesties powder-maker, whom I served, until I was prest to go on the 3. voyage to the West Indies, with the right worshipful Sir John Hawkins, who appointed me to be one of the Gunners in her Majesties ship called the Jesus of Lubeck, who set saile from Plimmouth in the moneth of October 567. having with him another ship of her Majesties, called the Minion, and foure ships of his owne, namely the Angel, the Swallow, the Judith, and the William and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
er from the newfoundland of Peru ) might long since have beene in the tower of London , to the kings great honour and wealth of this realme. Hereunto that also is toe triall thereof, and communicated that devise with his worshipful friendes of London : namely with Sir Lionell Ducket, sir Thomas Lodge, M. Gunson his father in lawn the beginning of June, we set forward, & in our course we met with a ship of London , & afterwards with another ship, but tooke nothing from either of them. Our fit from the aforesaid William Mace, to Master Edward Wilkinson of Towre-hill in London . My principall intention by this example is to admonish our nation of circumspbert Fred; and The Virgin our pinnesse under Captaine Henry Kidgil: Begun from London the 25. of Januarie 1591. Written by M. John Twitt of Harewich, Corporall in t foorth of England : as also by a Fleming that had seene all our provision at London . The 28 being Sunday at ten of the clocke at night wee set saile, and stood
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Sir Thomas Pert, and Sebastian Cabot, about the eight yeere of King Henry the eight, which was the yere 1516. to Brasil , Santo Domingo, and S. Juan de Puerto rico. (search)
nce of Sebastian Cabot yet living and one Sir Thomas Pert, whose faint heart was the cause that the voyage tooke none effect; if, I say, such manly courage, whereof wee have spoken, had not at that time beene wanting, it might happily have come to passe, that that rich treasurie called Perularia, (which is nowe in Spaine in the citie of Sivill, and so named, for that in it is kept the infinite riches brought thither from the newfoundland of Peru ) might long since have beene in the tower of London , to the kings great honour and wealth of this realme. Hereunto that also is to bee referred which the worshipfull M. Robert Thorne wrote to the sayde king Henry the 8. in the yeere 1527. by doctor Leigh his ambassadour sent into Spaine to the Emperour Charles the fift, whose wordes bee these. Now rest to be discovered the North parts, the which it seemeth unto me, is onely your highnes charge and dutie, because the situation of this your realme is thereunto neerest and aptest of all other:
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage of the right worshipfull and valiant knight sir John Hawkins, sometimes treasurer of her Majesties navie Roial, made to the West Indies 1562. (search)
amongst them by diligent inquisition, of the state of the West India, whereof hee had received some knowledge by the instructions of his father, but increased the same by the advertisments and reports of that people. And being amongst other particulars assured, that Negros were very good marchandise in Hispaniola, and that store of Negros might easily bee had upon the coast of Guinea, resolved with himselfe to make triall thereof, and communicated that devise with his worshipful friendes of London : namely with Sir Lionell Ducket, sir Thomas Lodge, M. Gunson his father in law, sir William Winter, M. Bromfield, and others. All which persons liked so well of his intention, that they became liberall contributers and adventurers in the action. For which purpose there were three good ships immediatly provided: The one called the Salomon of the burthen of 120. tunne, wherein M. Haukins himselfe went as Generall: The second the Swallow of 100. tunnes, wherein went for Captaine M. Thomas Hamp
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Master Andrew Barker of Bristol, with two ships, the one called the Ragged staffe, the other the Beare, to the coast of Terra firma, and the Bay of Honduras in the West Indies, in the yeere 1576. Wherein the reasons are premised which mooved him to set forth this voyage against the Spaniards: collected out of certaine notes and examinations touching this enterprise by M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
so to recover his losse of the Spaniards themselves, at his owne charge with the help of his friends hee furnished two barkes for the West Indies, the greater of which barkes was called the Ragged staffe, himselfe being captaine, & Philip Roche Master thereof, the other named the Beare had one William Coxe of Limehouse for her Master and captaine. And thus all our company being imbarked at Plimmoth on Whitsonday in the beginning of June, we set forward, & in our course we met with a ship of London , & afterwards with another ship, but tooke nothing from either of them. Our first arrival was at one of the Island of Cape Verde, named Del sal, vz. the Isle of salt, where we tooke certain fishes called Tortoises: and there we remained one night and halfe the day following. And from thence wee came to the Isle of Maio, being distant from Isla del sal, 14 or 15 leagues, where we tooke in fresh water and traffiqued with certaine Portugals inhabiting in that place, of whom we had some victua
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe remembrance of a voyage made in the yeere 1589 by William Michelson Captaine, and William Mace of Ratcliffe, Master of a ship called the Dogge, to the Bay of Mexico in the West India. (search)
Master & others, notwithstanding al the prepared trappes of the enemie, lept overboord into the sea, and so came safe to their own ship: and directing his course for England , arrived at Plimouth the tenth day of September, 1589, laden with wines, yron, Roans, which is a kinde of linnen cloth, and other rich commodities, looking for the arrivall of the rest of his consorts, whereof one and the principall hath not long since obtained his Port. Thus much in generall termes onely I have as yet learned, and received touching this voyage, extracted out of letters sent from the aforesaid William Mace, to Master Edward Wilkinson of Towre-hill in London . My principall intention by this example is to admonish our nation of circumspection in dealing with that subtill enemie, and never to trust the Spanish further, then that their owne strength shall be able to master them: for otherwise whosoever shall through simplicitie trust their curtesie, shall by tryall taste of their assured crueltie.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true report of a voyage undertaken for the West Indies by M. Christopher Newport Generall of a fleete of three shippes and a pinnesse, viz. The golden Dragon Admirall, whereof was Captaine M. Newport himselfe; The Prudence Vice-admirall, under the conduct of Captaine Hugh Merrick; The Margaret under Captaine Robert Fred; and The Virgin our pinnesse under Captaine Henry Kidgil: Begun from London the 25. of Januarie 1591. Written by M. John Twitt of Harewich, Corporall in the Dragon. In which voyage they tooke and burnt upon the coast of Hispaniola, within the bay of Honduras , and other places, 3. townes, and 19. saile of shippes and frigats. (search)
A true report of a voyage undertaken for the West Indies by M. Christopher Newport Generall of a fleete of three shippes and a pinnesse, viz. The golden Dragon Admirall, whereof was Captaine M. Newport himselfe; The Prudence Vice-admirall, under the conduct of Captaine Hugh Merrick; The Margaret under Captaine Robert Fred; and The Virgin our pinnesse under Captaine Henry Kidgil: Begun from London the 25. of Januarie 1591. Written by M. John Twitt of Harewich, Corporall in the Dragon. In which voyage they tooke and burnt upon the coast of Hispaniola, within the bay of Honduras , and other places, 3. townes, and 19. saile of shippes and frigats. THE 12. daye of Februarie An. 1591. we set saile from Dover roade, and having a prosperous winde, the 27. day of the same moneth wee fell with Cape Cantin on the coast of Barbarie, and on the 28. wee arrived at Santa Cruz roade, where having refreshed our selves some 3. or 4. dayes, we put off to sea againe, and about the 5. of March wee pa
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage truely discoursed, made by sir Francis Drake, and sir John Hawkins, chiefly pretended for some speciall service on the Islands and maine of the West Indies, with sixe of the Queenes ships, and 21 other shippes and barkes, containing 2500 men and boyes, in the yeere 1595. In which voyage both the foresayd knights died by sicknesse. (search)
taves killed the captaine and three or foure of his company: the rest were sore wounded: the Salomons Chirurgian taken prisoner, who disclosed our pretended voyage as much as in him lay: so as the Viceroy sent a caravel of adviso into the Indies, unto all such places as wee did pretend to goe to. Howbeit they had intelligence from the king of all our voyage the eight of August, which was three weekes before we set foorth of England : as also by a Fleming that had seene all our provision at London . The 28 being Sunday at ten of the clocke at night wee set saile, and stood away Southwest and Southsouthwest some 200 leagues, untill we came in the height of the Islands of Cape Verde, and then more Westerly for Martinino, one of the Islands of the West Indies, which we saw the 27 of October: but the night before we had a storme, in which sir Francis with foure or five other ships bearing on head of the fleete was separated. Then we stood for Dominica , an Island full of inhabitants
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The discoverie of the large, rich, and beautifull Empire of Guiana, with a relation of the great and golden citie of Manoa (which the Spaniards call El Dorado) and the provinces of Emeria, Aromaia, Amapaia, and other countries, with their rivers adjoyning. Performed in the yeere 1595 by Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Captaine of Her Majesties Guard, Lorde Warden of the Stanneries, and Her Highnesse Lieutenant Generall of the Countie of Corne-wall. (search)
we saw divers hils and rocks in every part of Guiana , wherein we traveiled. Of this there have bin many trials, and in London it was first assaid by M. Westwood a refiner dwelling in Woodstreet, and it held after the rate of 12000. or 13000. poune of copper made in Guiana , which held a third part of gold, besides divers trials made in the countrey, & by others in London . But because there came ill with the good, & belike the said Alderman was not presented with the best, it hath pleased h them: I may not name him, because it may be for his disadvantage, but hee is well knowen to Monsieur Mucherons sonne of London , and to Peter Mucheron merchant of the Flemish shippe that was there in trade, who also heard what he avowed to be true ely the first setting out in victualling and arming them : for after the first or second yeere I doubt not but to see in London a Contractation house of more receipt for Guiana , then there is now in Sivill for the West Indies. And I am resolved
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