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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White, Andrew 1579-1656 (search)
White, Andrew 1579-1656 Clergyman; born in London, England, presumably in 1579; was ordained a priest in 1605; became a Jesuit in 1609; accompanied Lord Baltimore to America in 1633; labored among the Piscataway and Patuxent Indians, and translated into the Indian language a catechism, grammar, and vocabulary. His publications include Extracts from the letters of missionaries; Narrative of travels in Maryland; Declaration to the colonies by Lord Baltimore. He died in London, England, Dec.drew 1579-1656 Clergyman; born in London, England, presumably in 1579; was ordained a priest in 1605; became a Jesuit in 1609; accompanied Lord Baltimore to America in 1633; labored among the Piscataway and Patuxent Indians, and translated into the Indian language a catechism, grammar, and vocabulary. His publications include Extracts from the letters of missionaries; Narrative of travels in Maryland; Declaration to the colonies by Lord Baltimore. He died in London, England, Dec. 27, 1656.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilkes, John 1727-1797 (search)
Wilkes, John 1727-1797 Politician; born in London, England, Oct. 17, 1727. He became a member of Parliament in 1757. In 1763 he made a severe attack on the govern- John Wilkes. ment in his newspaper (the North Briton, No. 45), for which he on afterwards elected to Parliament for Middlesex; but his seat was successfully contested and he was elected alderman of London. The same year he obtained a verdict of $20,000 against the secretary of state for seizing his papers. In 1771 he was sheriff of London, and in 1774 lord mayor. In 1779 he was made chamberlain, and soon afterwards retired from political life. Wilkes was always the champion of the colonists, and was regarded as the defender of popular rights. He died in London, Decondon, and in 1774 lord mayor. In 1779 he was made chamberlain, and soon afterwards retired from political life. Wilkes was always the champion of the colonists, and was regarded as the defender of popular rights. He died in London, Dec. 20, 1797.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, Roger 1599-1683 (search)
Williams, Roger 1599-1683 Founder of Rhode Island; born in Wales in 1599; went to London at an early age, where he reported sermons in short-hand, and attracted the attention of Sir Edward Coke, who befriended him in his efforts to obtain a collegiate education. He was at Pembroke College in 1623, and graduated in January, 1627. He took orders in the Church of England, but imbibed dissenting ideas, and came to Boston in 1630, where he was regarded as an extreme Puritan. He was accompanied by his wife, Mary, a young Englishwoman, who shared in the joys and sorrows of his long life. At Boston he became obnoxious to the authorities because he denied the right of magistrates to interfere with the consciences of men, and soon went to Salem, where he became assistant pastor of the church there. He was complained of by the Bostonians because he had refused to join with the congregation there until they should make a public declaration of their repentance for having communion with th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wines, Enoch Cobb 1806-1879 (search)
, D. C.; became a teacher on board the United States ship Constellation in 1829; and later taught in Princeton and Burlington, N. J., and Philadelphia, Pa.; was ordained in the Congregational Church in 1849, and held pastorates in Cornwall, Vt., and Easthampton, L. I., till 1854, when he was appointed Professor of Ancient Languages in Washington College, Pa. He was made president of the University of St. Louis in 1859; was secretary of the New York Prison Association from 1862 till his death; and was actively engaged in prison reform. In 1871 he was sent to Europe by the United States government to make arrangements for the international penitentiary congress which met in London, England, July 4, 1872. It appointed an international commission, of which Dr. Wines was made chairman. He published many volumes on the transactions of this body and of prisons and reformatories in the United States; Two years and a half in the American Navy, etc. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 10, 1879.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wolfe, James 1727- (search)
f a lantern, he sang the little campaign song beginning: Why, soldiers, why Should we be melancholy, boys? Why, soldiers, why, Whose business 'tis to die? But the cloud of a gloomy presentiment soon overcast his spirits, and at past midnight, when the heavens were hung with black clouds, and the boats were floating silently back with the tide to the intended landing-place at the chosen ascent to the General James Wolfe. (from a portrait by Schaak, in the National portrait Gallery, London.) Plains of Abraham, he repeated in a low tone, to the officers around him, this touching stanza of Gray's Elegy in a country Church-yard: The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, Await alike the inevitable hour— The paths of glory lead but to the grave. Now, gentlemen, said Wolfe, I would rather be the author of that poem than the possessor of the glory of beating the French to-morrow. He was killed the next day, and expired just as
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Women's clubs, General Federation of (search)
over 2,700 women's clubs, having a membership of 200,000 women in the United States and foreign countries. The purpose of the federation is declared in its articles of incorporation to be to bring into communication with one another the various women's clubs throughout the world, that they may compare methods of work and become mutually helpful. Constitutions of clubs applying for membership should show that no sectarianism or political test is required, and, while the distinctively humanitarian movements may be recognized, their chief purpose is not philanthropic or technical, but social, literary, artistic, or scientific culture. Meetings of the federation are held biennially. There are thirty State federations auxiliary to the general federation, and 595 single clubs in forty-one States. Several clubs from foreign countries are members of the federation—the Pioneer Club, of London; Woman's Club, of Bombay; and Educational Club, of Ceylon; clubs in Australia, South America, et
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wood, Walter Abbott 1815-1892 (search)
Wood, Walter Abbott 1815-1892 Manufacturer; born in Mason, N. H., Oct. 23, 1815; received a common school education; removed to Hoosic Falls in 1835, where he established himself as a manufacturer of reapers, mowers, and binders. He was elected to Congress in 1878 and 1880; served on the committees on public expenditures and on expenditures in the Interior Department; received the first prizes for the exhibit of his inventions at the world's fairs in London, Paris, Vienna, and Philadelphia. He died in Hoosic Falls, N. Y., Jan. 15, 1892.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), World's young women's Christian Association, (search)
World's young women's Christian Association, An organization founded in 1894. In 1900 eight national associations were affiliated: Great Britain, United States, Canada, Germany, Italy, Norway, Sweden, and India. The headquarters are in London. Office, 26 George Street, Hanover Square, West. The executive committee, chairman, Mrs. J. Herbert Tritton, is composed of fourteen British ladies and one American, Miss Annie M. Reynolds, who is the world's secretary. The first World's Association conference was held in London, June, 1898. Twenty-one States of the United States have organized State associations. Each State holds an annual convention. The international convention occurs biennially. Each year four summer schools are held for the training of young women in secretarial and Bible work. the Evangel, the official organ of the associations, is published monthly in Chicago, Ill. The second week of November is observed as a day of prayer for young women. A special departmen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wright, Sir James 1714-1785 (search)
, 1760; became royal governor of Georgia in 1764, and was the last representative of the King to administer the affairs of that colony. His policy was acceptable to the people until he tried to enforce the provisions of the Stamp Act. The English vessel Speedwell arrived at Savannah with the stamped paper, Dec. 5, 1766. The Liberty boys endeavored to destroy this paper, but it was placed in Fort George, on Cockspur Island. Two years later the governor dismissed the Assembly after accusing it of insurrectionary conduct. In June, 1775, he tried to communicate with a number of British war-ships which had arrived at Tybee, but he was taken prisoner by Joseph Habersham. Later he escaped and reached the man-of-war Scarborough. Subsequently he returned to England, but in 1779, when the British held Savannah, he was ordered to resume his office. He permanently retired to England at the close of the war; was created a baronet in December, 1772. He died in London, England, Nov. 20, 1785.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Yale, Elihu 1649-1721 (search)
Yale, Elihu 1649-1721 Philanthropist; born in New Haven, Conn., April 5, 1649; was educated in England. About 1678 he went to the East Indies where he remained twenty years and amassed a large estate. He was governor of Fort George there from 1687 to 1692. Mr. Yale married a native of the East Indies, by whom he had three daughters. He passed his latter days in England, where he was made governor of the East India Company and a fellow of the Royal Society. He remembered his native country with affection, and when the school that grew into a college was founded he gave donations to it amounting in the aggregate to about $2,000. It was given the name of Yale in his honor. He died in London, July 8, 1721.
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