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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 2 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 6 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 12, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
erein, except such as are hereunder named, 4; Oxford City, 2; Oxford University, 2. Gloucestershire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Gloucester, 7; Gloucester, 2. Herefordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Hereford, 4; Hereford, 1. Worcestershire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except Worcester, 4; Woreester, 2. Warwickshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Coventry, 5; Corentry, 2. Northamptonshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Northampton. 5 ; Northampton, 1. Bedfordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 4. Cambridgeshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder particularly named. 4; Cambridge University, 2; Cambridge Town, 2. Essex, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Colchester, 11; Colchester, 2. Suffolk, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Government, instrument of. (search)
nster, 1; Hertfordshire, 5; St. Alban's, 1; Hertford, 1; Huntingdonshire, 3; Huntingdon, 1; Kent, 11; Canterbury, 2; Rochester, 1; Maidstone, 1 ; Dover, 1; Sandwich, 1; Queenborough, 1; Lancashire, 4; Preston, 1; Lancaster, 1; Liverpool, 1; Manchester, 1; Leicestershire, 4; Leicester, 2; Lincolnshire, 10; Lincoln, 2; Boston, 1; Grantham, 1; Stamford, 1; Great Grimsby, 1; Middlesex, 4; London, 6; Westminster, 2; Monmouthshire, 3; Norfolk, 10; Norwich, 2; Lynn-Regis, 2; Great Yarmouth, 2; Northamptonshire, 6; Peterborough, 1; Northampton, 1; Nottinghamshire, 4; Nottingham, 2; Northumberland, 3; Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1; Berwick, 1; Oxfordshire, 5; Oxford City, 1; Oxford University, 1; Woodstock, 1; Rutlandshire, 2; Shropshire, 4; Shrewsbury, 2; Bridgnorth, 1; Ludlow, 1; Staffordshire, 3; Lichfield, 1; Stafford, 1; Newcastle-under-Lyne, 1; Somersetshire, 11; Bristol, 2; Taunton, 2; Bath, 1; Wells, 1; Bridgewater, 1; Southamptonshire, 8; Winchester, 1; Southampton, 1; Portsmouth, 1; Isle of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lane, Sir Ralph 1530-1604 (search)
Lane, Sir Ralph 1530-1604 Colonial governor: born in Northamptonshire, England, about 1530; was son of Sir Ralph Lane, and Maud, daughter of Lord Parr, uncle of Catharine Parr, one of the queens of Henry VIII. He was equerry in the Court of Queen Elizabeth; commanded troops in Ireland, first in 1569, and again in 1583-84; and was sent from England with Sir Richard Granville, by Sir Walter Raleigh, to be governor of Virginia, in 1585. After his return from Virginia he was colonel in the expedition of Norris and Drake against Portugal in 1589, and in 1591 was mustermaster-general in Ireland. He was knighted by the lord-deputy in 1593. Lane's administration as governor of Virginia was fruitless of any good. By following the example of Grenville he exasperated the Indians. Had he been kind and wise the colony might have prospered; but he and his followers were greedy for gold, and only Harriott, the historian, acted like a sensible Christian. Lane had the gold fever severely,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stone, William 1603-1695 (search)
Stone, William 1603-1695 Colonial governor; born in Northamptonshire, England, about 1603; settled in Virginia. Later he arranged with the second Lord Baltimore, Cecil Calvert, to place in Maryland 500 Puritan colonists who claimed to have been ill-treated by the Episcopalians in Virginia. He was governor of Lord Baltimore's province in 1648-53. In recognition of his services to the proprietary he was given as much land as he could ride around in a day. He died in Charles county, Md., about 1695.
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 3: the third and fourth generation (search)
delphia and becomes its leading citizen, fights the long battle of the American colonies in London, sits in the Continental Congress, sails to Europe to arrange that French Alliance which brought our Revolution to a successful issue, and comes home at last, full of years and honors, to a bland and philosophical exit from the stage! He broke with every Puritan tradition. The Franklins were relatively late comers to New England. They sprang from a long line of blacksmiths at Ecton in Northamptonshire. The seat of the Washingtons was not far away, and Franklin's latest biographer points out that the pinkcoated huntsmen of the Washington gentry may often have stopped at Ecton to have their horses shod at the Franklin smithy. Benjamin's father came out in 1685, more than fifty years after the most notable Puritan emigration. Young Benjamin, born in 1706, was as untouched by the ardors of that elder generation as he would have been by the visions of Dante — an author, by the way, who
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
ewtown, they expressed their earnest desires to Mr. Hooker, that he would come over into New England, and take the pastoral charge of them. At their desire, he left Holland; and, having obtained Mr. Samuel Stone, a lecturer at Torcester, in Northamptonshire, for an assistant in the ministry, took his passage for America, and arrived at Boston September 4, 1633. . . . . Mr. Hooker, on his arrival at Boston, proceeded to Newtown, where he was received with open arms by an affectionate and pious pten by Mr. Shepard and by his successors in the ministry. The relations previously existing between Mr. Shepard and many of the early members of this Church are mentioned by himself in his autobiography. Born Nov. 5, 1605, at Towcester, Northamptonshire, and educated at Emanuel College in Cambridge, A. B. 1623, A. M. 1627, he took orders in the English Church; but as he could not conscientiously conform to all its ceremonies, he was constantly harassed by its rulers, and prevented from the
he removed to Hampton, which he represented in 1651 and 1652. He d. 1660, leaving sons Joseph and Benjamin, and four daughters. 2. Abraham, appears on the Record to have been a Selectman here in 1640. This may denote the same person who was of Dedham, freeman 1637. Joseph, m. Susanna Dickson 23 Jan. 1777. Elizabeth, of Nantucket, a descendant from Rev. Samuel Angier, m. Andrew Craigie Jan. 1797, and d. 7 May 1844, a. 69. Shepard, Rev. Thomas, s. of William, b. in Towcester, Northamptonshire, 5 Nov. 1605, grad. at Cambridge, England, 1623, came to New England in 1635, and was immediately established here in the ministry. A large number of his friends and acquaintances either preceded or accompanied him, and purchased the estates of the first company, most of whom were about removing to Connecticut with Hooker. Mr. Shepard was thrice married, 1st in England to Margaret Touteville 1632, who d. early in 1636; 2d, to Joanna, dau. of Rev. Thomas Hooker, 1637, who d. 28 Ap. 16
he removed to Hampton, which he represented in 1651 and 1652. He d. 1660, leaving sons Joseph and Benjamin, and four daughters. 2. Abraham, appears on the Record to have been a Selectman here in 1640. This may denote the same person who was of Dedham, freeman 1637. Joseph, m. Susanna Dickson 23 Jan. 1777. Elizabeth, of Nantucket, a descendant from Rev. Samuel Angier, m. Andrew Craigie Jan. 1797, and d. 7 May 1844, a. 69. Shepard, Rev. Thomas, s. of William, b. in Towcester, Northamptonshire, 5 Nov. 1605, grad. at Cambridge, England, 1623, came to New England in 1635, and was immediately established here in the ministry. A large number of his friends and acquaintances either preceded or accompanied him, and purchased the estates of the first company, most of whom were about removing to Connecticut with Hooker. Mr. Shepard was thrice married, 1st in England to Margaret Touteville 1632, who d. early in 1636; 2d, to Joanna, dau. of Rev. Thomas Hooker, 1637, who d. 28 Ap. 16
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
ard, the whole being prizes won by the family race-horses. . . . In the evening we looked over a good many of Lord Fitzwilliam's curious black-letter books, and Lord Spencer told us so much about Althorp, that I was very glad to promise to make him a visit there on our return from the Continent. Dr. Dundas read the evening service at ten o'clock. The chapel was very full to-night, more than a hundred servants being present. The huntsmen in their scarlet dresses, who have come [from Northamptonshire] since we were here before, made quite a show. October 5.—It is a rainy morning, and yet when we went to breakfast I found Lord Spencer with spurs on, prepared for a ride. He told me that he is going to Wakefield, to see the prison there, and had sent on one of his horses to change half-way. The distance is eighteen miles, making thirty-six in all, which he prefers to take on horseback, notwithstanding the rain, and to be back to dinner. . . .. Lord Fitzwilliam generally makes his
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
lined, so as to stay as late as we could with our admirable old friend, whose kindliness, gayety of heart, and talent have been our constant delight since we have been in Cambridge. At last, between eleven and twelve, we took our leave, and the old gentleman, coming down stairs and following us to the gate of his College, gave us a sort of paternal benediction in the open street. We parted from him with great regret. A night passed at Milton, Lord Fitzwilliam's delightful place in Northamptonshire, where the kind hospitality of three years before was renewed, was followed by a course of cathedrals and show-houses, on the northern route, from Ely to Alnwick, until the Scottish Border country was reached. The hills which we crossed, in order to strike the Tweed at its most favorable point, were dreary and barren enough, and the ranges of huts or hovels we saw, scattered through their ridges, in which live a sort of bondmen, of a peculiar character, were anything but agreeable to
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