hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America.. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 152 results in 4 document sections:

smart, and it is one of his merits. The United States Senator for Ohio procured for young Grant,48 was signed the treaty which gave to the United States Texas with the Rio Grande for its boundaryut to uphold the power and grandeur of the United States, thought themselves quite free to wish wellar and unaristocratic institutions of the United States, and be therefore averse to any weakening the horses they were then riding; that the United States did not want them, and he would therefore zarin says, heureux; and such a leader the United States found in General Grant. He concludes hiown country and some remarks on ours. The United States, he says, are going on as if in the greatetime until we could prepare for them. The United States should have a good navy, and our sea-coastperation. The hostility of England to the United States, during our rebellion, was not so much reas of one political party. England and the United States are natural allies, and should be the best[6 more...]
he world, I have never yet been able to go to America, and probably I never shall be able. But manand on civilization, and then is told that in America a lover of these will find just what suits hi better than to find the difficulty solved in America, to find democracy a success there, with a tynds, from the example of the people of the United States. I go back again to my Boston newspaper:- northern, middle, and southwestern states of America, and this in addition to circles in New York en America, and I have not. Perhaps things in America are as he says. I am sure I hope they are, fst every town of the great majority of the United States a type of elegant and simple social order,rich people quite sufficiently materialized. America has not our large and unique class of gentlemhe really fruitful reform to be looked for in America, so far as I can judge, is the very same refohronicles of Jumbo, my critic will tell me what he thinks of it. A word more about America. [72 more...]
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., III: a word more about America. (search)
think it to write a worthy book about the United States, when I am not entirely satisfied with eveI should expect to find, of course, in the United States the total absence; that our lower class I inal thoughts respecting the people of the United States. The new and modifying impressions broughth increased respect. Until I went to the United States I had never seen a people with institutioncapital fact as to the institutions of the United States is this: their suitableness to the America in the politics and administration of the United States than in those of England. I believe theretion. Here, again, I do not mean that the United States are exempt from the operation of every onemidable. Lord Macaulay predicted that the United States must come in time to just the same state on the condition of the English race in the United States, I had said beforehand, indeed, that I supthe end. Cupples & Hurd, the Algonquin press, Boston. civilization in the United States. [23 more...]
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., IV: civilization in the United States. (search)
the social condition of the people of the United States, I said that what, in the jargon of the prout the contrast which in this respect the United States offer to our own country,--a contrast, in ask how the human problem is solved in the United States. It happened that Sir Lepel Griffin, a vecial, had just then been travelling in the United States, and had published his opinion, from what al and social problem by the people of the United States, I shall discuss their success in solving briefest possible manner. I said that the United States had constituted themselves in a modern ageproblem, I observed that the people of the United States were a community singularly free from the fs caused by inequality over here. In the United States there is not our intense division of classes, much less free and prosperous than the United States, are yet more truly civilized; have more we hard unintelligence of the people of the United States --Ia dure inintelligence des Americains du[11 more...]