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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Preface (search)
present generation; (2) It is the first history of American literature composed with the collaboration of a numerous body of scholars from every section of the United States and from Canada; (3) It will provide for the first time an extensive bibliography for all periods and subjects treated; (4) It will be a survey of the life of odious comparisons between Harvard College and other universities for the proportion of worthy men therein educated; but New England, compared with other parts of America, may certainly boast of having brought forth very many eminent men, in proportion more than any of them; and of Harvard College (herein truly a Sion College) it ms of literature, such as travels, oratory, memoirs, which have lain somewhat out of the main tradition of literary history but which may be, as they are in the United States, highly significant of the national temper. In this task we have been much aided by the increasing number of monographs produced within the past quarter of a
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
ramidwise, is the finest type of the seamen who made the English occupation of America possible. The narrative of Gilbert's fatal voyage, written by Edward Haie, foies equally between the old and New England, and his Key into the languages of America was cast into shape while he was on his way from one to the other. Robert Sto enable him to embark on the vessel on which his wife had taken passage for America. Journeying to Boston, they missed imprisonment through a legal technicality, I, Chap. v. kept a diary during his constant journeyings between England and America and through the mainland colonies. These personal records were published at tsmouth in New Hampshire was a pleasure trip, probably the earliest recorded in America. Reading was easily the first of Dr. Hamilton's pleasures. On his journey sy during the next generation, when the wars between the French and English in America, the beginnings of colonial, and then national, pride, the growth of natural s
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the historians, 1607-1783 (search)
d integrity had won for him the confidence of the Pilgrims ere they sailed for America. In 1621 he was chosen governor, and he held the office by annual re-electionlham Palace. In 1844 Wilberforce published a book on the Protestant Church in America, in which he referred to the manuscript. Four years later appeared Anderson'ss English and it was superior to that which the succeeding generation, born in America, could be expected to have. Two historians, however, Captain Edward Johnson a purposes they looked forward to the second group, men who were either born in America or who arrived after the American ideals were well enough formed to master thepment of a political unit. New England did not have the only Indian wars in America, but she alone had worthy historians of them. The struggles of 1622 and 1642 reserve the Empire undivided, and hoped that some plan might be found by which America might have home rule without renouncing the name British. He was opposed in p
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: the Puritan divines, 1620-1720 (search)
set up a Kingdom of God on earth that the Puritan leaders came to America; and the phrase should enlighten us concerning their deeper purposwhole instead of separating from it. But they had been preceded to America by the Plymouth congregation, a body of low-born Separatists, who hilosophy. It was to set up no Hebraic absolutism that he came to America; it was to establish a free commonwealth of Christ in which the loication of many, until the restoration of Charles sent him back to America to become the guiding spirit of the New England hierarchy. He wasent, see Walker's History of the Congregational churches in the United States, pp. 201-213. Seven years later John Wise, pastor of the secondtution ; but the significance of them in the history of democratic America lies in the fact that he followed an unbeaten path, justifying theGentium, published in 1672. This was the first effective reply in America to the old theocratic sneer that if the democratic form of governm
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Edwards (search)
ersey. death. the relations of Edwards to the deistic controversy. the freedom of the will Jonathan Edwards was born at Windsor, Connecticut, in 1703. He belonged, unlike his great contemporary Franklin in this, to the Brahmin families of America, his father being a distinguished graduate of Harvard and a minister of high standing, his mother being the daughter of Solomon Stoddard, a revered pastor of Northampton, Massachusetts, and a religious author of repute. Jonathan, one of eleven l canon to distinguish between the order and harmony governed by a power higher than either the imagination or the emotions, and the order and harmony that are merely stagnation. One factor in his confidence was a belief that the discovery of America, coinciding as it did with the beginning of the Reformation, came by Providence for the glorious renovation of the world ; nay more, that the humble town in which he was preaching might be the cradle of the new dispensation, from whence it shoul
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: philosophers and divines, 1720-1789 (search)
fessed that, though he liked to look behind the gay curtain, he preferred ease and independence in the tranquil vales of America. On his return home, Johnson found neither ease nor tranquillity. Coming back to the land of the blue laws, he felt obcause it supplied him with the strongest arguments against the doctrine of necessity. But when Berkeley himself came to America, the neophyte fell in love with the author and his system at the same time. It was then that Johnson, according to his ,--that was all very well; but for the Dean's disciple to attempt to introduce into the schools and infant seminaries in America this unadulterated Irish idealism was another thing. Doctor Johnson, explains his critic, only pretends to teach logic fore that conflict came. So the prospect of a road lying open to degeneracy in some parts of this newly settled land of America, now drove Woolman to publish, and at his own expense, Some considerations on the keeping of negroes recommended to the
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
loyed the case of the uneducated tradesman of America to support his contention that regular educattradition is still an uneducated tradesman of America : a runaway Boston printer walking up Market owner of one of the best private libraries in America was as a mere child an eager collector of boocal chronicle for all the British colonies in America; this monthly, notable as the second issued in America, expired with the sixth number. In 1742 he invented the stove of which he published a dtions in electricity, made at Philadelphia in America, by Mr. Benjamin Franklin. In 1752 he showed exercise the office of postmaster-general of America. In 1754 as a member of the Pennsylvania com Smith, Robertson, and Kames. He returned to America in the latter part of 1762. In 1763 he made a treaty of peace between England and the United States. This last great task was completed in r7r as to make a war between Prussia and the United States under its terms virtually impossible. His
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
The New England Courant. Isaiah Thomas, History of printing in America. In Transactions and collections of the American antiquarian Soci a preface of glowing compliment. Reports of French interest in America inclined the colonists still more to the French philosophy of goved in other papers, as the most daring production ever published in America, the country as a whole was ready for Tom Paine's Common sense. es. There were a few magazines of this standard English type in America before the Revolution. Franklin, as usual, led the way, though itgazine and historical chronicle for all the British plantations in America, shows his intention of giving a review of colonial news rather th its editor and guiding spirit. The Rev. William Smith, called to America from Aberdeen in 1752, brought a great love of letters to his new Paul Revere engravings and is otherwise interesting, particularly for its confident belief in the new country soon to be the United States.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
ting the British colonies on the Continent of America considered, in a letter from a Gentleman in Plet, of which some eight editions appeared in America, two in London, one in Dublin, and a French vdon, and a reprint many years later in the United States, gave some vogue to the name Novanglus, thnd where he continued to publish pamphlets on America until the end of the war. Another New Yorkwholly respectable career in England, came to America in 1774, in his thirty-eighth year, armed wit to witness the passing of royal authority in America. With the rejection of petitions on the one ormally recognized the independence of the United States; but independence had been achieved in fac, there were many who were now to set the United States forward in the next stage of its career. o the Vices of the Political System of the United States, Writings, ed. Hunt, II, 361-369. and phe constitutions of government of the United States of America. This work, written and first publis[9 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
title of The tenth Muse, lately sprung up in America, and a second edition followed in Boston in 15), who was born in England, but emigrated to America, and graduated from Harvard at the age of twe sufficient evidence that Dryden was known in America before 1700, in spite of some fairly regular of some interest as the first of its kind in America. were published anonymously in the newspapers leaders. Almost everyone who wrote verse in America after the Revolution produced an ode or an epth a boundless belief in the possibilities of America and her divine mission. No other member ofs the first truly imaginative poem written in America is of more than passing interest. Godfrey's ella Cruscan school of poetry was welcomed in America by Cliffton, whose verse was at least manly aative, is the most remarkable poem written in America up to its time. In the use of romantic scenepest, which he was the first to popularize in America. His later satires, usually in lyrical stanz[19 more...]
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