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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 4 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 4 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 21, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 4, chapter 33 (search)
But the DeliansThis Delian story about the Hyperboreans is additional evidence of the known fact that trade routes from the earliest times linked northern with southeastern Europe. Amber in particular was carried from the Baltic to the Aegean. say much more about them than any others do. They say that offerings wrapped in straw are brought from the Hyperboreans to Scythia; when these have passed Scythia, each nation in turn receives them from its neighbors until they are carried to the Adriatic sea, which is the most westerly limit of their journey; from there, they are brought on to the south, the people of Dodona being the first Greeks to receive them. From Dodona they come down to the Melian gulf, and are carried across to Euboea, and one city sends them on to another until they come to Carystus; after this, Andros is left out of their journey, for Carystians carry them to Tenos, and Tenians to Delos. Thus (they say) these offerings come to Delos. But on the first journey, the Hyp
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
f the square would be found merely a little more retired, to the frontiers of a great power or to a sea. To be assured of the correctness of these ideas, it is sufficient to cast an eye over the theatre of the campaign of 1806 and 1807. The Baltic Sea, and the frontiers of Austrian Gallicia, formed the two faces Ab and Cd of the square. I think that it was very important to both the parties, not to allow themselves, to be thrown upon either of those obstacles. The configuration of the fr sort of temporary base; the front of operations was parallel to the Narew, from whence Napoleon departed, supporting himself on Sierock, Pultusk and Ostrolenka, to the end of manoeuvreing by his right, to throw the Russians upon Elbing and the Baltic Sea. In such cases the front of operations, if it should find the least point of support in its new direction, would produce the same advantage that we have pointed out in Article 18 for bases of operations perpendicular to those of the enemy. It
d Auerstadt, front against Prussia; they were defeated, and the remainder of their army obliged to lay down arms, as they found their line of retreat continually closed by Napoleon's division advancing parallel with them in the direction of the Baltic Sea. In Fig. 1 we have but to replace a c by the River Maine, a b by the Rhine, and c d by the Baltic Sea. A would be the Prussian army, which has for sole retreat c d. F is the first, and F′ the second, position of the French. Should the enemBaltic Sea. A would be the Prussian army, which has for sole retreat c d. F is the first, and F′ the second, position of the French. Should the enemy, however, keep such a position that neither the manoeures against his center nor against his communications are possible, then it is necessary to resort to stratagems which shall induce him to make wrong movements, divide his troops, extend his line, etc. For instance, we may give our whole army such a position, or we may, before the commencement of the operations, place our army corps in such a manner, that they can act with the same facility against very distant points. The enemy is ob
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Neutrality. (search)
Neutrality. A movement in Europe, known as the Armed neutrality, threatened to seriously cripple the power of Great Britain and incidentally aid the Americans in their struggle for independence. It was a league of the leading nations of Europe against the pretensions of Great Britain as Mistress of the seas. It was conceived in the summer of 1778, when British cruisers seized American vessels in the Baltic Sea engaged in commerce with Russia. The latter nation was then assuming colossal proportions, and all the others courted the friendship of its empress, Catharine II., who was able and powerful. Great Britain tried to induce her to become an ally against France. Catharine coquetted a long time with King George, while her sympathies were with Sweden, Denmark, and Holland. Their neutral ships were continually interfered with by British sea-rovers, whose acts were justified by the British government. France had gained the good — will of the Northern powers by a proclamatio
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), The tent on the Beach (search)
the blindfold lad From one of Vulcan's forge-boys? —” Nay, He better sees who stands outside Than they who in procession ride, “ The Reader answered:” selectmen and squire Miss, while they make, the show that wayside folks admire. “Here is a wild tale of the North, Our travelled friend will own as one Fit for a Norland Christmas hearth And lips of Christian Andersen. They tell it in the valleys green Of the fair island he has seen, Low lying off the pleasant Swedish shore, Washed by the Baltic Sea, and watched by Elsinore.” Kallundborg Church. “Tie stille, barn min! Imorgen kommer Fin, Fa'er din, Og gi'er dig Esbern Snares öine og hjerte at lege med!” Zealand Rhyme. “build at Kallundborg by the sea A church as stately as church may be, And there shalt thou wed my daughter fair,” Said the Lord of Nesvek to Esbern Snare. And the Baron laughed. But Esbern said, ‘Though I lose my soul, I will Helva wed!’ And off he strode, in his pride of will, To
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Index (search)
. Angler's Song, the, 79. Antwerp, 161. Appleton, Frances E. See Longfellow, Frances A. Appleton, Nathan, 121,171. Appleton, Thomas G., 103, 219, 273. Arfwedson, Mr. and Mrs., 93, 95. Arnold, Mr., 70. Arnold, Matthew, 6. Atchafalaya, Lake, 195. Athenaeum Library, 285. Atlantic Monthly, the, cited, 233 note; mentioned, 287. Auersberg, Anton A., 161. Austen, Mrs., Sarah, 269. Austin, William, 64, 68 and note. Auteuil, 46. Bacon, Lord, 164. Baireuth, 289. Baltic Sea, 132. Balzac, Honore de, 177. Bancroft, George, 71, 112; his History of the United States, mentioned, 143. Bandmann, 241, 242. Barbauld, Mrs., Anna Letitia, 62, 63. Barlow, Joel, 23. Barnard, Mr., 91. Bartlett, Elizabeth. See Wadsworth, Elizabeth B. Bartlett family, the, 13. Beattie, James, 62. Beaugency, 48. Becker, Rudolph Z., 161. Belgium, 158, 170. Bennett, Dr., 250. Bennoch, Mr., 250. Bentham, Mr., 91. Berlin, 98. Bernadotte, King, 94. Berryer, Antoine
es on refined sugars to Oct. 1st, 1861. The accounts from the manufacturing districts continue to be favorable. The high price of sugar in Paris has somewhat paralyzed the trade. The fine weather last week has again favored the farmers in completing their field work; but not withstanding this, and the caution observed by buyers, the French corn markets remain firm. The price of flour is well maintained in the Paris market. A deficiency of corn exists in Italy, and supplies from the Baltic Sea are impatiently awaiting at Leghorn. Great complaints are heard in Central Italy of the long continued dry weather.--The low water in the river Dheister has prevented the arrival of wheat from Odessa. Italy. Defeat of the Bourbon Army. Naples,Nov. 3.--The Piedmontese army, under the command of King Victor Emmanuel, has gained a brilliant victory on the other side of the Zarigliano. The Bourbon army was attacked in front with great spirit by the troops, and on flank by the f