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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
nder Vicksburg the Gibraltar of the West, and for a long period it bade defiance to the Army and Navy combined. The Vicksburg miscarriage enabled the enemy to fortify Port Hudson and Grand Gulf, which thus became two formidable barriers against the advance of the Navy. When Vicksburg was invested in 1863 by the Army under Major General Grant, and a large naval force under Rear-Admiral Porter, many efforts were made by the latter officer to send vessels down to blockade the mouth of the Red River, and thus cut off supplies from Port Hudson and Vicksburg; but, owing to casualties in the vessels sent on this duty, there was a failure to bring about the desired result. Rear-Admiral Farragut then attempted to push up past Port Hudson with his squadron, and met with serious loss. However, with the Hartford and Albatross, he reached the mouth of Red River, and established so stringent a blockade that the Confederates in Port Hudson and Vicksburg could no longer obtain supplies from t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
Arkadelphia. March 29th, where, for the present. we will leave them. General Banks had informed the Admiral that he would march an army of 36,000 men to Alexandria, La.. and would meet him at that place on the 17th of March. On the 10th of March the naval vessels had assembled at the mouth of Red River, and, on the 11th, Geroops. As it was hardly possible to communicate with Steele in any other manner, the General proposed sending one of the fast naval dispatch steamers down the Red River, up the Mississippi and Arkansas Rivers, thence via Little Rock to Camden, Arkansas, a distance of over five hundred miles. A messenger was sent accordingly, butd on the 26th and 27th the whole force marched into Alexandria in excellent condition and went into camp. From Cane River the road to Alexandria diverged from Red River, and, of course, the transports and Eastport could expect no further support from the Army. The Admiral had, therefore, to depend upon his own resources for get
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
e correspondence: Mississippi Squadron, Flag-Ship Cricket, Off Alexandria, May 11th, 1864. Major-General N. P. Banks, Commanding Department of the Gulf, Alexandria, La.: General--Colonel Wilson called to see me this morning, and seemed to think the Navy were relaxing their exertions above. There is really nothing that can waters of Red River booming, and all the tributaries throwing in their supply at the same time, they could feel certain of a permanently full river. When full, Red River is easily navigable, and any expedition started by Sherman and Admiral Porter would have been as successful as the Arkansas Post expedition. Sherman was willingon, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at from 7,000 to 10,000,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
tter part of February, Admiral Porter fitted out an expedition to go, via the Red River, up the Black and Washita Rivers, under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Fr such operations. On the 29th of February the expedition proceeded up the Red River into the Black. as far as the town of Trinity, where they were attacked by arson Taylor, Marksville, La.; S. L. Taylor, Marksville, La.; H. Robertson, Alexandria, La.; S. W. Henarie, Alexandria, La.; Governor T. O. Moore, Alexandria, La.; CoAlexandria, La.; Governor T. O. Moore, Alexandria, La.; Colonel C. Manning, Alexandria, La.; General M. Wells, Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; General P. F. Kearny, Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; Hugh M. Kearny, Esq.Alexandria, La.; Colonel C. Manning, Alexandria, La.; General M. Wells, Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; General P. F. Kearny, Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; Hugh M. Kearny, Esq., Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; B. F. Murdock, Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; B. C. Crow, Esq., Lafayette Parish, La.; Hon. John Moore, St. Martin's Parish;Alexandria, La.; General M. Wells, Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; General P. F. Kearny, Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; Hugh M. Kearny, Esq., Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; B. F. Murdock, Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; B. C. Crow, Esq., Lafayette Parish, La.; Hon. John Moore, St. Martin's Parish; William Robertson, St. Martin's Parish; Judge Baker, St. Mary's Parish; T. J. Foster, St. Mary's Parish; Judge Palfrey, St. Mary's Parish; Daniel Dennett, editor Pl
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
ed. From the battle of Shiloh, where the gunboats covered the retreating troops. which rallied under their protecting fire and finally gained the day, to the fall of Fort Fisher, the Navy played a more active part than was perhaps ever before taken by naval forces, and though illy supplied with the proper kind of vessels, they seldom experienced reverses. There were the fights of Hatteras, Port Royal, New Orleans, Mobile, Vicksburg, and all along the Mississippi and its tributaries, Red River, Arkansas. White, Tennessee, Cumberland and Ohio Rivers, Grand Gulf, Port Hudson, Charleston, Galveston, and the whole coast of Texas brought under control. This was a large field of naval operations, seldom equalled in the history of war, and never exceeded, as far as naval successes are concerned. In this account of the Fort Fisher affair we have endeavored to do justice to all parties, but as General Butler was not partial to the Navy, and might perhaps think that a naval writer wo
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
Mississippi Squadron, as the war was now drawing rapidly to a close. The retreat of Hood left the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers comparatively free from Confederates, and there was little prospect of another invasion of the State while General Thomas remained in command. The vessels of the Mississippi Squadron were scattered along the great river, where the guerillas still carried on their operations on a small scale. Very little occurred that could embellish the pages of history. The Red River region was revisited, the Washita and Black Rivers patrolled, and every precaution taken to guard those inland waters. At this time the Confederate ram Webb succeeded in making her way past all the vessels of the fleet and reached a point twenty-five miles below New Orleans, where she was destroyed, as we have heretofore mentioned. This episode created quite an excitement in the fleet for the time, but it appears that no one was to blame for the Webb getting so far down the river unhar
s clearing the Atchafalaya fight at Carney's bridge Farragut passes the batteries at Port Hudson Banks returns to Berwick's Bay advances to Opelousas and Alexandria, La. moves thence to Bayou Sara, and crosses the Mississippi invests Port Hudson combined attack on its defenses repulsed with a loss of 2,000 Banks presses tof grand canal, river, sound, and lagoon, receives the waters of the Bayou Teche — each of them heading near, and at high water having navigable connection with, Red river. South of the railroad and east of the Atchafalaya, the country had already been in good part overrun by our forces; but our possession of it was imperfect and y conduct. During his retreat, the famous Queen of the West was assailed by our gunboats in Grand Lake, whither she had worked her way down the Atchafalaya from Red river,and destroyed; her crew being made prisoners. Banks was delayed by Taylor's burning, as he fled, the bridges over the many bayous and sluggish water-courses o
tant, with purposes and results entirely unknown to me. Feb. 5, I was informed by Gen. Steele that, if any advance was to be made, it must be by the Washita and Red rivers; and that he might be able to move his command, by the way of Pine Bluff, to Monroe, for this purpose. This would have united our forces on Red river, and insuRed river, and insured the success of the campaign. Feb. 28, he informed me that he could not move by way of Monroe; and March 4, the day before my command was ordered to move, I was informed by Gen. Sherman that he had written to Gen. Steele to push straight for Shreveport. March 5, I was informed by Gen. Halleck that he had no information of Gen.'s march on one flank, and Red river as near on the other. It is surely to be regretted that our army, if unable to advance, had not moved by the right flank to Red river, or simply held its ground for two or three days, while its wounded were sent away to Grand Ecore, instead of being abandoned to the enemy. Banks admits a los
e Mississippi to New Orleans. The troops were assigned to duty at various places in the Department of the Gulf,--in Texas and Louisiana. General Osterhaus was succeeded in command of his division by General C. C. Washburn. The Third and Fourth Divisions fought at Grand Coteau, La., November 3, 1863. The winter of 1863-4 was spent in the vicinity of New Orleans and the Lower Mississippi, a part of the corps being stationed in Texas. Corps headquarters were in Texas, but were moved to Alexandria, La., on the 18th of April, as the Third and Fourth Divisions had accompanied Banks on his Red River Expedition of April, 1864. General McClernand was again in command of the corps; the Third Division was commanded by General Cameron, and the Fourth, by General Landram. The First and Second Divisions remained in Texas during the Red River Expedition, excepting Lawler's (2d) Brigade, of the First Division, which joined Banks' Army about the 20th of April. The Third and Fourth Divisions of t
14 121   G   7 7   12 12 127   H 1 23 24   10 10 144   I 1 15 16   13 13 129   K 2 7 9   8 8 128 Totals 7 120 127 3 122 125 1,308 Total of killed and wounded, 339. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Wilson's Creek, Mo. 106 Atchafalaya, La. 1 Tuscumbia Mountain, Miss. 2 Vicksburg, Miss. (1864) 1 Old River, La. 1 Columbia, Ark. 2 Bayou Macon, La. 3 Guerrillas 2 Lake Providence, La. 3 Rebel Prison Guard 1 Cross Bayou, La. 1 Place unknown 3 Alexandria, La. 1     Present, also, at Dug Springs, Mo.; Trenton, Tenn.; Tallahatchie, Miss.; Big Black River, Miss.; Yazoo City, Miss. notes.--Organized at Leavenworth in May, 1861, and in June, was ordered into Missouri where it joined General Lyon's forces. It fought at Wilson's Creek, August 10, 1861, a desperate battle in which General Lyon was killed, and in which the regiment suffered an unusual loss, its casualties amounting to 77 killed, 187 wounded, and 20 missing; a total of
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