hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Annapolis (Maryland, United States) or search for Annapolis (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

ty. The light boats on the Potomac have been burnt by citizens of Virginia and Maryland. The steamer Keystone State, on her return to Philadelphia, passed down the river this morning. It is said that no troops have yet moved from Annapolis. Among the reports from Washington is one that four regiments have been raised in St. Louis for Lincoln. It is also said that five regiments went to sea from New York for Annapolis, in large vessels. There is no communication with Ba Keystone State, on her return to Philadelphia, passed down the river this morning. It is said that no troops have yet moved from Annapolis. Among the reports from Washington is one that four regiments have been raised in St. Louis for Lincoln. It is also said that five regiments went to sea from New York for Annapolis, in large vessels. There is no communication with Baltimore by mail, the Federal Government having possession of the Washington and Baltimore Railroad. Gazette.
riginal camp over toward the railroad. We have brief and vague accounts of the movements of the Northern troops at Annapolis. Eighteen hundred men, supposed a Massachusetts regiment and the New York Seventh Regiment, had landed there and were Grace yesterday afternoon, that there were eight hundred Pennsylvania troops at Perrysville, awaiting transportation to Annapolis. They had arrived yesterday morning, and were anxious to proceed on their route to Washington. There is no doubt that the military road ordered by Gen. Scott is to be across the country from Annapolis to Washington city. The American also says: Yesterday afternoon Serg't Lindsay. of the Central Station, proceeded at the head of a squad of policemen to tleman who was at the Junction at 3 o'clock, and had a conversation over the wires from that point with the operator at Annapolis, that the troops had all landed and commenced their march, and that the road was lined with Marylanders prepared to dis
e concentration of Northern troops at Perrysville, on the Susquehanna, and at Annapolis, has excited vigilant surveillance in those directions. Two thousand stt of the excitement one of the soldiers dropped dead from the ranks. From Annapolis. We learn from a gentleman who left Annapolis about 7 o'clock last eveniAnnapolis about 7 o'clock last evening by land, that when three miles from that city he met two U. S. Army officers, escorted by a detachment of the Vansville (Md.) Rangers, Cap. Snowden, and that he wngton by the Government, with directions to order the Northern troops, now at Annapolis, to return home. Annapolis,April 23. --The Seventh New York Regiment (nuAnnapolis,April 23. --The Seventh New York Regiment (numbering 991 men) and the Massachusetts Regiment landed last night at the Naval Academy. Last evening, the Vansville Rangers, of Prince George county, interceptethheld here, and no mails or freight can be had from Baltimore. Later.-- Annapolis, April 23.--Two companies of the Massachusetts regiments have this moment tak
be a loss surpassing calculation. There is a motive selfish to Virginia, which, though all unworthy of mention in these heroic times, we will venture to put down.--The securing of Maryland throws the border (the border as to military operations) beyond the confines of Virginia. It opposes Maryland, as a breastwork and shield for Virginia, against the assaults of the foe. The value of Maryland to Virginia in military strategy, is illustrated by what is now transpiring at Baltimore and Annapolis. But the fact of Maryland constituting such a shield and bulwark, imposes upon Virginia and the South the duty of supporting her with adequate forces. The present attitude of Maryland calls loudly upon Virginia to proceed against Washington city. While Maryland drives back his reinforcements, surely Virginia should make haste to capture the foe himself. This very moment ought to see our long-range cannon planted on the heights of Arlington, and the bayonets of our legions on the