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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 27, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

The New Senator from Mississippi. --The Confederate Senator elect from Mississippi, Hon. J. W. C. Watson, is said to be one of the ablesmen in that State. The Atlanta Register names the following facts about him: He stood at the head of a body of jurisconsults famed for their attainments, who, many year ago, made Holly Springs, by the attractions they contributed to social life, the most delightful interior city of the South. Mr. Watson has been distinguished, not less than his more noisy compeers, for his firm devotion to the cause of Southern independence. He was appointed last year by the President Commissioner for Mississippi under the Appraisement Act, and has sedulously devoted himself to the duties of his position. He is tall, slender, with blue eyes, light hair, and with an expression of face, benignant manner, and musical voice, remarkably attractive in social intercourse. In his professional habits he was the most laborious of men, and his success at the bar
[Press Dispatch.] Atlanta, Nov. 26. --Trains from the front come in full of Yankee prisoners. No wounded have yet come in. The Atlanta Relief Committee commenced sending supplies to the front to-day. The city is full of rumors, but nothing authentic has been received since Gen. Bragg's dispatch of yesterday. [secondAtlanta Relief Committee commenced sending supplies to the front to-day. The city is full of rumors, but nothing authentic has been received since Gen. Bragg's dispatch of yesterday. [second Dispatch.] Atlanta, Nov, 26. --The news from our army is conflicting. It is believed that our troops are still falling back. No train has arrived since this morning. Every preparation has been made in the hospitals here for our wounded, but none have yet arrived. The Intelligencer's correspondent, who has returned Atlanta, Nov, 26. --The news from our army is conflicting. It is believed that our troops are still falling back. No train has arrived since this morning. Every preparation has been made in the hospitals here for our wounded, but none have yet arrived. The Intelligencer's correspondent, who has returned from the front, furnishes the following: The enemy, after a desperate and bloody struggle, gained Craven's House, on the northern slope of Lookout Mountain Walthall's brigade suffered severely, holding two divisions in check, and a large portion of it was captured. Stevenson's division occupied the crest of the mountain. The assa
ity on Friday afternoon, might have been seen, apart from the rest, a fair-haired youth, not exceeding eighteen, and in form frail as a girl. Suspicion being aroused, an examination discovered the party to be Miss Franc Miller, of the 32d New York regiment. She came into our lines about a week ago, near Tuscumbia, Ala., accompanied by a gaunt fellow, Isaac James by name. They said that they were tired of the service and wanted to go home. The girl had enlisted when the war began, and has fought through nearly all the battles of the West. Love — that knavish elf — was the inspiring cause of her martial peregrination. Her "true love" (the aforesaid Isaac James) had "gone in," and she couldn't feel it in her heart to stay at home, so she listed too, and has marched and battled by his side till now. The pair exhibit great affection, and declare if they ever get "tu hum," they'll make a match of it. The Provost Marshal has sent them forward to Richmond.-- Atlanta (Ga.) Confederac