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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
ssas, Va., 1861. Jones, C. A., Capt., Va., Nottoway C. H., 1862. Jones, J. G., Capt., Va., Kernstown, Va., 1862. Jones, J. T., Ala., Cold Harbor, Va., 1862. Jones, L. B., Va., 1862. Jeffrey, A., Va., Norfolk. Jones, T. R., Capt., Va., Selma, Ala., 1864. Jones, J. L., Va., Gettysburg, Pa. Jones, F. P., Lt., Va., Winchester, Va., 1863. Jordan, W. J., Surg., N. C., South Mount, Md., 1864 Jordan, J. W., Ala, Manassas, Va., 1861. Keels, W. E., Capt., S. C., Charleston, W. Va., 1861. Kemper, G. B., Lt., S. C., Wilderness, Va., 1862. Kilpatrick, F. W., Col., S. C., Lookout Mt., Tenn., 1864. Kinchloe, W. J., Lt. Adjt., Va., Smithfield, W. (?)Va., 1863. Lane, T. H., N. C., Florida. Lamar, C. A., Ga., Columbus, Ga., 1865. Lane, R. W., Ala., Huntsville, Ala. Lane, G. H., Capt., Va., 1862. Latane, W., Capt., Va., Old Church, Va., 1862. Latane, J., Lt., Va., Washington, D. C., 1864. Latham, R. P., Lt., Va., Culpeper C. H., Va., 1862.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical memorial of the Charlotte Cavalry. (search)
s Court House, W. Va., July 26. Fayetteville, W. Va., September 10. Cotton Hill, W. Va., September 11. Montgomery's Ferry, W. Va., September 12. Charleston, W. Va., September 13. Buffalo, W. Va., September 27. Charleston, W. Va., October 6. Bulltown, W. Va., October 9. Charleston, W. Va., October 16. KanCharleston, W. Va., October 6. Bulltown, W. Va., October 9. Charleston, W. Va., October 16. Kanawha Falls, W. Va., October 31. 1863. with Gen. R. E. Lee in his advance into Pennsylvania. Middletown, Va., June 11. Winchester, Va., June 13. White Post, Va., June 14. Bunker Hill, Va., June 15. Martinsburg, W. Va., June 15. Greencastle, Pa., June 20. Chambersburg, Pa., June 20. Carlisle, Pa., June 29Charleston, W. Va., October 16. Kanawha Falls, W. Va., October 31. 1863. with Gen. R. E. Lee in his advance into Pennsylvania. Middletown, Va., June 11. Winchester, Va., June 13. White Post, Va., June 14. Bunker Hill, Va., June 15. Martinsburg, W. Va., June 15. Greencastle, Pa., June 20. Chambersburg, Pa., June 20. Carlisle, Pa., June 29. Gettysburg. Pa., July 1, 2, 3. Samuel M. McCargo killed, Henry C. Chappell, Jno. Roberts wounded and died. Wash Chappell wounded. Monterey Gap, Md., July 5. Hagerstown, Md., July 6.. Lieut. W. R. Gaines wounded. Boonsboro, Md., July 7, 8. Williamsport, Md., July 14. Lieut. D. Shepperson killed, Jno. P. Marshall
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
a sketch of Traveller by the man who formerly owned him. It has been incorrectly stated some time ago that General Lee's famous war-horse Traveller, was formerly owned by Captain John S. Brown. He was owned by Major Thomas L. Broun, of Charleston, W. Va., and the following sketch of the horse, written by that gentleman for the Richmond Dispatch, in 1886, is worthy of reproduction: Gen. R. E. Lees war-horse. In view of the fact that great interest is felt in the monument about to be erhis horse had survived the war and was known as Traveller (spelling the word with a double l in good English style), and asking for its pedigree, which was obtained as above mentioned and sent by my brother to General Lee. Thomas L. Broun. Charleston, W. Va., August, 1886. From Gen. Fitzhuigh Lees book on Gen. Robert E. Lee, 1894. Traveller, the most distinguished of the General's warhorses, was born near Blue Sulphur Springs, in West Virginia, and was purchased by General Lee from Major
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E Lee's war-horse: a sketch of Traveller by the man who formerly owned him. (search)
a sketch of Traveller by the man who formerly owned him. It has been incorrectly stated some time ago that General Lee's famous war-horse Traveller, was formerly owned by Captain John S. Brown. He was owned by Major Thomas L. Broun, of Charleston, W. Va., and the following sketch of the horse, written by that gentleman for the Richmond Dispatch, in 1886, is worthy of reproduction: Gen. R. E. Lees war-horse. In view of the fact that great interest is felt in the monument about to be erbeen added by General Lee to the price I gave for the horse in September, 1861, to make up for the depreciation in our currency from September, 1861, to February, 1862. In 1868 General Lee wrote to my brother stating that his horse had survived the war and was known as Traveller (spelling the word with a double l in good English style), and asking for its pedigree, which was obtained as above mentioned and sent by my brother to General Lee. Thomas L. Broun. Charleston, W. Va., August, 1886.
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia a town of 3,000 pop., on Kanawha River, 60 miles from its mouth. The river is navigable to this point. The center of a large trade. Post Office, Kanawha C. H.
er, VIII., 313; ruins of, IX., 39; Circular Church in, IX., 39; ruins of Secession Hall, IX., 45; Cathedral of St. John and St. Finbar, IX., 47; war time in, IX., 49; The City Bides the Foe, IX., 49.; Central Church, IX., 51; Magnolia Cemetery at, IX., 274, 277; Federal graves at, IX., 281; ruins of Pinckney mansion, IX., 319, 321; fire of December, 1861, IX., 321; captured arms in, IX., 333; Fort Sumter celebration, IX., 334, 335; harbor, X., 156. Charleston, Tenn., II., 348. Charleston, W. Va., I., 364; II., 344. Charleston, H. Timrod, IX., 48. Charleston, ship, VIII., 45. Charlottesville, Va., IV., 96, 110. Chartres, Due de, I., 115. Chase, S. P., I., 28; X., 12. Chase, W. H.: demands surrender of Fort Pickens, Fla., VIII., 156. Chasseur,, U. S. S., I., 356. Chatfield, S. C., battery at, V., 110, 117. Chattahoochee bridge, Ga., III., 121. Chattahoochee River, Ga.: III., 18, 119, 124, 130, 216, 326. Chattahoo
Kanawha Valley. Extract of a letter dated-- Charleston, Kanawha Co., Va., June 6th, 1861. Public sentiment is getting much more united here, and the large majority in this county will unite in defending Virginia. There is no prospect of an immediate invasion in this valley, and we hope to be ready to meet them should they come. There are now about 800 soldiers here and 500 at Cove. They are coming in every day. * In connection with the foregoing, we make an extract from the Kanawha Valley Star, of the 4th inst.: It is exceedingly gratifying to every patriot to hear staunch Union men, men who advocated and voted for "rejection" of the Ordinance of Secession, now express a willing submission to the overwhelming majority of the people, and declare their readiness to take up arms in defence of the unity and independence of the State. The voice of the people ratified the action of the State Convention in thundering tones that will resound throughout the North
Captured. --Alexander Wright, the penitentiary convict who escaped from the guard on the Capitol Square some weeks since, has been re-arrested at Charleston, Kanawha county.
From Kanawha. --The editor of the Lewisburg Chronicle publishes some facts from a letter dated Charleston, Kanawha county, June 30: Gen. Wise was then in Charleston, and Capt. O. J. Wise's company, the Richmond Blues, left Charleston about 10 o'clock at night, June 29th, for Gilmer county, in consequence of having learned that about 100 of the enemy had crossed over and were committing depredations. Capt. Brock's Rockingham Cavalry and Capt. Beirne's Monroe Rifles had also left, but were expected to return in a few days. One of the Monroe Company died on the 29th from measles; he exposed himself imprudently during his sickness. A company of Riflemen arrived on the 30th from Roane county, with three prisoners; one of them a delegate to the Wheeling Convention, and the others had violated the persons of two ladies. The people were talking of lynching them, but the writer thought they would be left in the hands of the legal tribunals. So far as the writer can judge from w
from Gen. Wise's command — Operations in the Kanawha Valley — Exploit of the Richmond Blues--the fight near Beverley. The Richmond Enquirer publishes the following extract of a letter from Charleston, Kanawha county, the present headquarters of General Wise. Alluding to the General, the writer says: He seizes traitors, and the enemy crosses the river somewhere and seizes citizens who are royal, to hold as hostages. The General's time is half taken up with trying traitors; the other day we caught a spy, (a German Jew,) with a clothing store worth $5,000. He was caught fair, and too plain to deny, and so he forfeited all his stock, which clothes our poor mountain boys. He was warned by the General that he would have to kneel upon his coffin, which made him turn pale; and when he was told that he had lost all of his pack, he blubbered like a baby. Three nights ago we had to select 350 men to rush up to Ripley; the Richmond Blues started at 1 o'clock, on on
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