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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 255 53 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 178 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 96 96 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 81 27 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 47 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 36 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) or search for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
ad on occasions to give orders direct to the troops affected. On the 11th of March I returned to Washington, and on the day after orders were published by the War Department placing me in command of all the armies. I had left Washington the night before to return to my old command in the West and to meet Sherman, whom I had telegraphed to join me in Nashville. Sherman assumed command of the Military Division of the Mississippi on the 18th of March, and we left Nashville together for Cincinnati. I had Sherman accompany me that far on my way back to Washington, so that we could talk over the matters about which I wanted to see him, without losing any more time from my new command than was necessary. The first point which I wished to discuss particularly was about the cooperation of his command with mine when the spring campaign should commence. There were also other and minor points,--minor as compared with the great importance of the question to be decided by sanguinary war,--
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
Mississippi, but Smith was headed off by Forrest and defeated in an engagement at West Point, Mississippi, on the 21st. After destroying the railroads on the route, General Sherman abandoned the enterprise, and on February 20th put his troops in motion toward central Mississippi, whence they were transferred, later, to Vicksburg and Memphis.--editors. On the 18th of March he turned over to me the command of the Western armies, and started back for Washington, I accompanying him as far as Cincinnati. Amidst constant interruptions of a business and social nature, we reached the satisfactory conclusion that, as soon as the season would permit, all the armies of the Union would assume the bold offensive by concentric lines on the common enemy, and would finish up the job in a single campaign if possible. The main objectives were Lee's army behind the Rapidan in Virginia, and Joseph E. Johnston's army at Dalton, Georgia. On reaching Washington, Grant studied with great care all the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
sualties so small as reported at Kenesaw. In this he, unwittingly perhaps, compliments Sherman's army at the expense of his own. On the 22d of June, five days before the battle of Kenesaw, he tells us that the divisions of Stevenson and Hindman were repulsed, in an assault on. the Union line, with a loss of one thousand men. These divisions, June 10th, numbered over eleven thousand for duty. Their loss, therefore, was but nine per cent., while that of the troops of the Army of the Cumberland engaged at Kenesaw was 17 per cent.; of the Army of the Tennessee, ,1. per cent. In both cases the loss sustained was sufficient to demonstrate the futility of further effort. In neither case was it a fair test of the staying qualities of the troops, who on many fields had shown their willingness to shed any amount of blood necessary when there was reasonable hope of success. Cincinnati, September 8th, 1887. Confederate defenses at the bridge over the Etowah. From a War-time photograph.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
June 8th 94,310560112,908 112,819 July 1st88,0865945 12,039106,070 August 1st75,6595499 10,51791,675 September 1st67,67446909,394 81,758 Losses: killed, 4423; wounded, 22,822; captured or missing, 4442 = 31,687. (Major E. C. Dawes, of Cincinnati, who has made a special study of the subject, estimates the Union loss at about 40,000, and the Confederate loss at about the same.) The Confederate Army. Army of Tennessee, General Joseph E. Johnston, General John B. Hood. Escort, Capt.lled, 18,252 wounded = 21,996. The prisoners (including deserters) captured by the Union Army (See Sherman's Memoirs, Vol. II., p. 134), numbered 12,983, which gives 34,979 as the aggregate loss of the Confederate Army. (Major E. C. Dawes of Cincinnati, who has made a special study of the subject, estimates the Confederate loss at about 40,000, and the Union loss at about the same.) For statements relative to the strength of the Confederate army in the Atlanta campaign see General Johnston
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Resume of military operations in Missouri and Arkansas, 1864-65. (search)
nelle, and marched to the northern part of the State without opposition, and, in fact, without his movements being definitely known to General Rosecrans, who then commanded the Department of the Missouri at St. Louis. General William S. Rosecrans, who was relieved of command at Chattanooga, October 19th, 1863, assumed command of the Department of the Missouri, January 28th, 1864, and remained in command of that department until December 9th, 1864. For the remainder of the war he was at Cincinnati on waiting orders.--editors. When the Confederate forces entered Missouri they were met by detachments of the State militia, who captured several Confederate prisoners, from whom it was ascertained that the invading force was much larger than had been supposed, and that Price was marching direct for St. Louis. Rosecrans at once commenced collecting his forces to meet and check the enemy. General Thomas Ewing, Jr., was in command of the District of South-east Missouri. Pilot Knob, near Ir
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., John Morgan in 1864. (search)
ting away the masonry and the earth were two small knives, and the work was accomplished in twenty days, of five hours labor each day. After leaving the prison the party separated. General Morgan and Captain Hines took the cars at Columbus for Cincinnati. At Cincinnati they crossed into Kentucky, and, passing southward through New Castle and Bardstown, reached the Cumberland, near Burkesville, on December 5th. Soon afterward they fell in with a detachment of Morgan's men that had not taken paCincinnati they crossed into Kentucky, and, passing southward through New Castle and Bardstown, reached the Cumberland, near Burkesville, on December 5th. Soon afterward they fell in with a detachment of Morgan's men that had not taken part in the Ohio raid, and on the 13th crossed the Tennessee near Kingston. After several adventures with scouting parties of Union cavalry, in one of which Captain Hines was retaken, Morgan reached the Confederate lines.--editors. and reached the Confederate lines early in December. He was not ordered upon active service during that winter, but in April was virtually placed in command of the Department of South-western Virginia, which embraced also a portion of east Tennessee. The forces at hi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
rce it, if possible, by accessions from Tennessee. I was imbued with the belief that I could accomplish this feat, afterward march north-east, pass the Cumberland River at some crossing where the gun-boats, if too formidable at other points, were unable to interfere, then move into Kentucky, and take position with our left at or near Richmond, and our right extending toward Hazel Green, with Pound and Stony gaps in the Cumberland Mountains at our rear. In this position I could threaten Cincinnati, and recruit the army from Kentucky and Tennessee; the former State was reported, at this juncture, to be more aroused and embittered against the Federals than at any other period of the war. While Sherman was debating between the alternatives of following our army or marching through Georgia, I hoped, by rapid movements, to achieve these results. If Sherman should cut loose and move south — as I then believed he would do after I left his front without previously worsting him in battle-
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sigel in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864. (search)
eadquarters of the department. As this was the time when General Grant assumed the chief command of the armies and began his preparations for the campaign of 1864, it seemed to me necessary to subordinate all military arrangements in the department to the paramount object of making the bulk of our forces available as an auxiliary force in the prospective campaign. It was also necessary to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the shortest line of communication between Washington and Cincinnati. To reach these ends a system of defensive measures was applied to the line of that road, and the troops were concentrated at certain points on the road to be reorganized, disciplined, and provided with all the necessary material for active service. The intrenchments at Harper's Ferry were extended and strengthened, and the construction of detached works was begun at Martinsburg, Cumberland, Grafton, and Clarksburg, to protect these places against raiding parties. There were block-house
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
o, broke it open, and pulled out a little ball of tin-foil. Rolled up in this was a sheet of tissue paper on which was written the famous dispatch so widely published at the time, in which Sheridan Captain John R. Tucker, C. S. N. From a photograph. described the situation at Jetersville, and added: I wish you were here yourself. The general said he would go at once to Sheridan, and dismounted from his black pony Jeff Davis, which he had been riding, and called for his big bay horse Cincinnati. He stood in the road and wrote a dispatch. using the pony's back for a desk, and then, mounting the fresh horse, told Campbell to lead the way. It was found we would have to skirt the enemy's lines, and it was thought prudent to take some cavalry with us, but there was none near at hand, and the general said he would risk it with our mounted escort of fourteen men. Calling upon me and two or three other officers to accompany him, he started off. It was now after dark, but there was enou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The surrender at Appomattox Court House. (search)
t most desirable event, save thousands of human lives, and hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed. Seriously hoping that all our difficulties may be settled without the loss of another life, I subscribe myself, etc., U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. General R. E. Lee. It was proposed to him to ride during the day in a covered ambulance which was at hand, instead of on horseback, so as to avoid the intense heat of the sun, but this he declined to do, and soon after mounted Cincinnati and struck off toward New Store. From that point he went by way of a cross-road to the south side of the Appomattox with the intention of moving around to Sheridan's front. While riding along the wagon road that runs from Farmville to Appomattox Court House, at a point eight or nine miles east of the latter place, Lieutenant Charles E. Pease of Meade's staff overtook him with a dispatch. It was found to be a reply from Lee, which had been sent in to our lines on Humphreys's front. It r