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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 255 53 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 178 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 96 96 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 81 27 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 47 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 36 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) or search for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

and opposition against the use of colored troops was so strong that the war was half finished before they were organized to any extent. The first appearance of the negro in the military operations of that period occurred, September, 1862, in Cincinnati, at the time of the threatened invasion by Morgan's raiders. A so-called Black Brigade of three regiments was then organized, and assigned to duty in constructing the fortifications and earthworks about Cincinnati. These men gave their servicCincinnati. These men gave their services voluntarily, but were unarmed and without uniforms. Their organizations, such as it was, existed for three weeks only, and had no connection with the movement for enlisting colored troops. About this same time General Butler took the initiative in the enlistment of colored men as soldiers, by organizing at new Orleans the regiments known as the Louisiana Native Guards, one of which completed its organization in August, 1862, and was mustered into service on the 27th of the following month
ler, near Springfield, Ill., August 21, 1862. and ordered immediately on active duty in Kentucky. It assisted in covering the retreat after the battle of Richmond, Ky., and participated in other movements along the line between Louisville and Cincinnati. It was assigned to Sheridan's Division, and fought under that distinguished general until he was ordered to the East in the spring of 1864. Colonel Bernard Laiboldt, of the Second Missouri, commanded the brigade. The Seventy-third was engage 4 Weldon Railroad, Va. 10 Wilderness, Va. 20 Peeble's Farm, Va. 2 Spotsylvania, Va. 60 Picket, Va., December 13, 1864 1 North Anna, Va. 5 Fall of Petersburg, Va. 3 Bethesda Church, Va., June 3, 1864 25     Present, also, at Jamestown, Ky.; Vicksburg, Miss.; Loudon, Tenn.; Ny River, Va.; Hatcher's Run, Va.; Fort Stedman, Va. notes.--Left the State, April 12, 1863, with eight companies only. It was ordered to Kentucky, where it was stationed at various points until June, whe
reinforce General Grant. Part of the Ohio National Guard, also, went to the front, and one entire division of the Tenth Corps--General Orris S. Ferry's — was composed of these regiments. On entering the United States service the National Guard regiments dropped their former numerical designations, and were numbered to conform to their place in the list of Ohio Volunteers. In addition to the National Guard, the State organized and enrolled an efficient force of militia. In 1862, when Cincinnati was threatened by an invading army, 16,000 Squirrel Hunters marched to its defense. The veterans of the Ohio volunteers reenlisted in large numbers; 20,708 of them remained in the field after their three years enlistment had expired, and served through the rest of the war. It should be remembered that the volunteers who enlisted in 1862 were not eligible for the reenlistments just referred to; that only those who enlisted in 1861 could reenlist, and that, owing to the depletion of the r
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 13: aggregate of deaths in the Union Armies by States--total enlistment by States--percentages of military population furnished, and percentages of loss — strength of the Army at various dates casualties in the Navy. (search)
gate. 1861               Sept. 14 Colorado Russell Pensacola 3 9 -- 12 Nov. 7 Fleet Dupont Port Royal 8 23 -- 31 Nov. 7 Tyler Walke Belmont 1 2 -- 3 1862               Feb. 2 Essex Porter (W. D.) Fort Henry 7 20 5 32 Feb. 2 Cincinnati Stembel Fort Henry 1 7 -- 8 Feb. 8 Fleet Goldsborough Roanoke Island 6 17 -- 23 Feb. 15 St. Louis Paulding Fort Donelson 2 8 -- 10 Feb. 15 Louisville Dove Fort Donelson 4 5 -- 9 Feb. 15 Pittsburg Thompson Fort Donelson -- 2 -- 2 l 29 Benton Greer Grand Gulf 9 19 -- 28 April 29 Tuscumbia Shirk Grand Gulf 6 24 -- 30 April 29 Pittsburg Hoel Grand Gulf 6 13 -- 19 April 29 Lafayette Walke Grand Gulf -- 1 -- 1 May 4 Albatross Hart Fort De Russy 2 4 -- 6 May 27 Cincinnati Sunk in action. Bache Vicksburg 5 14 15 34 July 7 Monongahela Read Mississippi 2 4 -- 6 Sept. 7 Clifton Crocker Sabine Pass 10 9 -- 19 Sept. 7 Sachem Johnson Sabine Pass 7 Wounded not stated. -- 7 1864.          
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
Average strength of regiments 466 Addenda 576 Badges of the different corps 64 Baltimore Riot 470, 488 Bates, S. P., quoted 27, 57, 488, 489 Battles and engagements, number of, during the war, 542 Battles, list of, with Union loss in each 543 Battles, list of, with Confederate loss in each 549 Battles, chronological list of, with greatest regimental losses in each battle 561 Bayonet and sabre wounds 24, 78 Bering, Major John A., quoted 45 Black Brigade of Cincinnati 52 Bloodiest battle of the war 540 Border States, number of men furnished 537, 552, 554 Border States, loyalty of 536 Brigade losses, Confederate 558 Brigade losses, Union 116, 117, 118 Captured and missing 23, 424 Casualty returns, deficiencies in 574 Cause unknown, deaths from 530 Cavalry regiments, formation and strength of 6 Cavalry regiments, maximum losses in 6 Census of 1860, military population 535, 536, 537 Chaplains killed in battle 43, 44 C