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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 84 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 30 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Connecticut River (United States) or search for Connecticut River (United States) in all documents.

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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 31: the Workman's Paradise. (search)
ted on natural loveliness more perfect than the scenery amidst which St. Johnsbury stands. On passing White River Junction, a spot which recalls a favourite nook in the Neckar valley, we push into a gorge of singular beauty; a reach of the Connecticut River, lying under high and wooded hills, of various form and more than metallic brightness. Oak and chestnut, pine and maple, clothe the slopes. White houses lie about you; some in secret places, utterly alone with Nature; others again, in grmes the hills roll back, giving up margin and meadow to the grazier. Here you have herds of cattle, there droves of horses, feeding on the hillsides, or sauntering to the stream. Yet the main charm of this valley is the water-first of the Connecticut River, then of the Passumpsic River; each of these water-courses having the beauty common to flowing rivers and mountain streams. A pause. We mount a slope, and we are in the leaf-strewn avenue known as St. Johnsbury; the proper crown and citad