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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 84 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 30 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904. You can also browse the collection for Connecticut River (United States) or search for Connecticut River (United States) in all documents.

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Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Historical Sketch of the old Middlesex Canal. (search)
e canal system, undoubtedly had in mind, not only to connect Boston with the Merrimac River country, but also to extend their canals from the Merrimac to the Connecticut River, and from the Connecticut River to Lake Champlain, and through its outlet to the St. Lawrence, thus bringing Boston into island water communication with MontConnecticut River to Lake Champlain, and through its outlet to the St. Lawrence, thus bringing Boston into island water communication with Montreal and the lower Canada. The project was too vast, and the physical obstacles too formidable to admit of full consummation, and their labors resulted only in uniting by navigable water the capitals of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, covering a distance of about eighty-five miles. The Middlesex Canal, twenty-seven miles lon inland waterways, extending well into the interior of Massachusetts, and by way of the Merrimac River to Concord, New Hampshire, through Lake Sunapee to the Connecticut River, at Windsor, and thence to the St. Lawrence River. This seemed a good and practical plan, and if the railroad had been delayed ten years, would undoubtedly