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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
r 5000 Indians and mixed troops had previously joined Shelby. Together they attacked Salomon and drove him back in confusion. Schofield marched at once to the assistance of Salomon, and on the 4th of October reached Newtonia. Cooper and Shelby fell back toward Rains. Thereupon Schofield continued to advance, driving the Confederates before him out of Missouri and into the mountains of Arkansas. Thence Cooper continued to retreat toward the Indian Territory, while Rains made his way to Huntsville. Schofield sent Blunt in pursuit of Cooper, who was overtaken at Old Fort Wayne near Maysville on the 22d of October and completely routed and driven into the Indian Territory. Hindman had meanwhile returned to Fort Smith on the 15th of October. Learning there of the disasters that had befallen his army, he hastened to the front, relieved Rains, assumed command himself, and was about to take a strong position near Fayetteville, whither reenforcements were hastening to him, when Schofi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
under Thomas, General George H. Thomas succeeded General W. S. Rosecrans in command of the Department, and Army, of the Cumberland, October 19th, 1863.--editors. near Chattanooga; that of the Tennessee, under McPherson, scattered front Huntsville, Alabama, to the Mississippi; that of the Gulf, under Banks, in Louisiana; besides subordinate detachments, under Steele and others, in Arkansas and farther west. Grant took the whole field into his thought. He made three parts to the long, irrd little by little extended our deep ditches or log-barricades close up to Johnston's. As we settled down to steady work again, McPherson was near Brush Mountain, having pushed down the railroad. F. P. Blair's corps (the Seventeenth) from Huntsville, Alabama, had now joined him, making up for our losses, which were already, from all causes, upward of nine thousand. This accession gave heart to us all. Thomas was next, advancing and bearing away toward Pine Top, and Schofield coming up against
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
wn by the fact that General Stanley in the month of June led a strong force in rear of Bragg's position at Tullahoma, cutting the railroads at Decherd Station, whereupon Bragg fell back to Bridgeport. In July Stanley again made a movement upon Huntsville. Proceeding by several roads, the separate brigades of General J. B. Turchin and Colonels Eli Long and Robert Galbraith all reached Huntsville, Alabama, and, after capturing prisoners, supplies, and stock, returned without serious loss. TheHuntsville, Alabama, and, after capturing prisoners, supplies, and stock, returned without serious loss. The Confederates on their part also made a celebrated raid at this time. On the 27th of June Morgan crossed the Cumberland River at Burksville, Kentucky, with about 2500 men. He passed northwardly through Columbia, Kentucky, and, reaching Green River at Tebbs's Bend on the 4th of July, demanded the surrender of Colonel O. H. Moore, who was stationed there with a portion of his regiment — the 25th Michigan. Colonel Moore returned the famous reply that the 4th of July was not a good day to surrende
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
M. Schofield; Hatch's division of cavalry, about 4000; Croxton's brigade, 2500, and Capron's brigade of about 1200 [total, 29,700]. The balance of my force was distributed along the railroad, and posted at Murfreesboro‘, Stevenson, Bridgeport, Huntsville, Decatur, and Chattanooga, to keep open our communications and hold the posts above named, if attacked, until they could be reeinforced, as up to this time it was impossible to determine which course Hood would take — advance on Nashville, or turn toward Huntsville. It is estimated that the available Union force of all arms in and about Nashville on December 15th aggregated at least 55,000. Col. Henry Stone, of General Thomas's staff, furnishes the following estimate of the number of Union troops actually engaged in the battle (not including the garrison force and dismounted cavalry), viz.: Fourth Corps, 13,350; Twenty-third Corps, 8880; Detachment Army of the Tennessee, 9210; Steedman's Detachment, 5270; Cavalry Corps (mounted men),
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
men were favorable to postponing action altogether, until the 4th of March, with the hope of preserving the Union. So doubtful was the final result, that, so late as the 17th, January 1861. a dispatch was sent by telegraph to the Alabama delegation in Congress, to retain their seats until further advised. This opposition exasperated the ultra-secessionists, and they became very violent. When, in the debate that followed the presentation of the two reports, Nicholas Davis, of Huntsville, in northern Alabama, declared his belief that the people of that section would not submit to any disunion schemes of the Convention, William L. Yancey, whose business for many months had been to fire the Southern heart and precipitate the Cotton States into revolution, sprang to his feet, denounced the people of northern Alabama as Tories, traitors, and rebels, and said they ought to be coerced into submission. This high criminal, who had talked so defiantly about the sin of coercion on the part o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 13: the siege and evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
spirit of the more zealous conspirators and insurgents everywhere The cry of Pryor for blood was sent to Montgomery by telegraph the next morning, and Mr. Gilchrist, a member of the Alabama Legislature, said to Davis and a portion of his Cabinet (Walker, Benjamin, and Memminger):--Gentlemen, unless you sprinkle blood in the face of the people of Alabama, they will be back in the old Union in less than ten days. Speech of Jeremiah Clemens, formerly United States Senator from Alabama, at Huntsville, in that State, on the 18th of March, 1864. The sober second thought of the people was dreaded. The conspirators knew that there was solemn truth in the assertion, that the big heart of the people is still in the Union. It is now subjugated temporarily to the will of the politicians. Less than a hundred thousand politicians are endeavoring to destroy the liberties and usurp the rights of more than thirty millions of people. Raleigh (North Carolina) Banner. At two o'clock in the a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
from Bowen's battalion, which was all the cavalry convenient at the time. General Sigel also followed in pursuit toward Keitsville, while I returned, trying to check a movement which led my forces north, where I was confident a frightened foe was not likely to go. I soon found the rebel forces had divided and gone in every direction, but it was several hours before I learned that the main force, after entering the canon, had turned short to the right, following ravines which led into the Huntsville road in a due south direction. General Sigel followed, some miles north, toward Keitsville, firing on the retreating force that ran away; Colonel Bussy, with cavalry and the little howitzers, followed beyond Bentonville; I camped on the field, and made provision for burying the dead and care of the wounded. --General Curtis, in his official report. General Sigel pushed forward along the main road toward Keitsville, where General Price had been posted. He too had fled, and the Confederate
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
traordinary March southward, 265. capture of Huntsville, Alabama, 266. Memphis and Charleston railway seized neral Mitchel, went in the direction of Huntsville, in northern Alabama, to seize and hold the Memphis and Charfor only two days provisions, in the direction of Huntsville, making forced marches all the way. On the 10th shed on with his cavalry to within eight miles of Huntsville, the capture of which and the seizure of the Mempotes of a bugle. They were soon in motion toward Huntsville, with one hundred and fifty of Kenner's Ohio cavavictory. General Mitchel did not tarry long at Huntsville. Appointing Colonel Gazeley, of the Thirty-sevenpeditions to operate along its line each way from Huntsville. One, under Colonel Sill, went eastward as far aeled. Stevenson fell, sixty miles to the east of Huntsville. Decatur and Tuscumbia have been in like manner al Mitchel's thanks to his soldiers, Camp Taylor, Huntsville, April 16th, 1862. He had placed his army midway
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
and probably our cause. This dispatch was intercepted by General Mitchel, at Huntsville, and gave, doubtless, a correct view of Beauregard's extreme weakness thirty-as he did, had it not been for the assistance of the negroes. He found, near Huntsville, an intelligent one who was a carpenter. Having worked at his trade along thry of War on the first of May, 1862. The campaign is ended, and I now occupy Huntsville in perfect security, while in all Alabama north of the Tennessee River floatsy 1, 1862. that his campaign was ended, See page 291. and that he occupied Huntsville in perfect security, he was not idle nor less vigilant than before. He not o Most of them met at Chattanooga, on the day that Mitchel took possession of Huntsville. April 11, 1862. Some, who had arrived sooner, had gone by railway to Marieted, burn the bridges after us, dash through Chattanooga, and on to Mitchel at Huntsville. But more than one train had to be, passed before they could commence thei
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
vided into three corps, commanded respectively by W. J. Hardee, Leonidas Polk, and E. Kirby Smith. The latter was sent to Knoxville, and the former two held Chattanooga and its vicinity. Buell disposed his army in a line stretching from Huntsville, in Alabama, to McMinnsville, in Warren County, Tennessee. His headquarters, late in August, were at Huntsville, and General Thomas commanded the left wing at McMinnsville. E. Kirby Smith. So lay the opposing armies when E. Kirby Smith left KnoHuntsville, and General Thomas commanded the left wing at McMinnsville. E. Kirby Smith. So lay the opposing armies when E. Kirby Smith left Knoxville, and passing through Big Creek Gap of the Cumberland Mountains, with about six thousand men and a train of one hundred and fifty wagons, penetrated Kentucky by way of Knox County. By this movement he so completely outflanked and imperiled General G. W. Morgan, at Cumberland Gap, See page 303. that the latter blew up the works there and fled toward the Ohio, harassed nearly all the way by seven hundred of John Morgan's guerrillas. Smith's troops marched rapidly with very little encu
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