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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 360 128 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 94 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 70 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 8 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 42 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 38 2 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 37 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Huntsville (Alabama, United States) or search for Huntsville (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 17 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Birney, James Gillespie, 1792-1864 (search)
Birney, James Gillespie, 1792-1864 Statesman born in Danville, Ky., Feb. 4, 1792; graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1812; studied law with A. J. Dallas, of Philadelphia and began its practice in Kentucky in 1814. He was a member of the State legislature at the age of twenty-two; became a planter in Alabama; served in the Alabama legislature; and practised law in Huntsville. Returning to Kentucky in 1834, he emancipated his slaves, and proposed to print there an anti-slavery paper. He could not find a printer to undertake it; so he went to Ohio and established one, at great personal risk, the opposition to abolitionists then being very vehement everywhere. About 1836 he was in New York as secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society, and tried to build up a political party upon that sole issue. He went to England in 1840, and took part in the anti-slavery movements there. In 1844 he was the candidate of the liberty party (q. v.) for the Presidency, the result of wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brooks, William Thomas harbaugh, 1821-1870 (search)
Brooks, William Thomas harbaugh, 1821-1870 Military officer: born in New Lisbon. O., Jan. 28, 1821; graduated at West Point in 1841; served under Scott in the war against Mexico, and became brigadier-general of volunteers in 1861, serving in the Army of the Potomac. In July, 1864, he was temporarily in command of the 10th Army Corps, and resigned the same month. He died in Huntsville. Ala., July 19, 1870.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Callis, John B. 1828-1898 (search)
Callis, John B. 1828-1898 Military officer; born in Fayetteville, N. C., Jan. 3, 1828; went to Wisconsin in 1840; entered the army as captain in the 7th Wisconsin Volunteers when the Civil War broke out; brevetted brigadier-general in March, 1864; sent to Huntsville, Ala., as assistant commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau; resigned and elected to Congress in 1868. During his term of office he presented the resolution on which the Ku Klux Klan (q. v.) bill was passed. He died in Lancaster, Wis., Sept. 23, 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clay, Clement Claiborne 1819- (search)
Clay, Clement Claiborne 1819- Lawyer; born in Huntsville, Ala., in 1819; graduated at the University of Alabama in 1835; admitted to the bar in 1840; elected United States Senator in 1853 and 1859; was expelled in 1861; and elected to the Confederate Senate. In 1864 he was a secret Confederate agent to Canada, and participated in laying the plans for the raids on the northern border. At the close of the war, hearing that a reward was offered for his capture, he surrendered himself, and wa; elected United States Senator in 1853 and 1859; was expelled in 1861; and elected to the Confederate Senate. In 1864 he was a secret Confederate agent to Canada, and participated in laying the plans for the raids on the northern border. At the close of the war, hearing that a reward was offered for his capture, he surrendered himself, and was a prisoner with Jefferson Davis in Fort Monroe; was released in 1866; and resumed the practice of law at Huntsville, Ala., where he died, Jan. 3, 1882.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clingman, Thomas Lanier 1812-1897 (search)
Clingman, Thomas Lanier 1812-1897 Legislator; born in Huntsville, N. C., July 27, 1812; graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1832; settled in Asheville, N. C.; United States Senator from 1858 till 1861, when he resigned, with other members from the Southern States. He joined the Confederate army, and was made a brigadier-general in May, 1862. In 1855 he located the highest point of the Black Mountain, which has since been known as Clingman's Peak ; and he also discovered the highest point of the Smoky Mountain in 1858, now known as Clingman's dome. He died in Morgantown, N. C., Nov. 3, 1897.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dodge, Richard Irving, 1827-1895 (search)
Dodge, Richard Irving, 1827-1895 Military officer; born in Huntsville, N. C., May 19, 1827; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1848; served through the Civil War; was commissioned colonel of the 11th Infantry June 26, 1882; retired May 19, 1891. His publications include The Black Hills; The plain of the Great West; Our wild Indians, etc. He died in Sackett's Harbor, June 18, 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
sed several trains before they began to destroy the road. The first train that came to a broken spot had its engine reversed and became a pursuer of the raiders. Onward they dashed with the speed of a gale, passing other trains, when, at an important curve in the road, after destroying the track a considerable distance, Andrews said, Only one more train to pass, boys, and then we will put our engine at full speed, burn the bridges after us, dash through Chattanooga, and on to Mitchel, at Huntsville. The exciting chase continued many miles. The raiders cut telegraph wires and tore up tracks. The pursuers gained upon them. Finally their lubricating oil became exhausted, and such was the speed of the engine that the brass journals in which the axles revolved were melted. Fuel failing, the raiders were compelled to leave their conveyance, 15 miles from Chattanooga, and take refuge in the tangled woods on Chickamauga Creek. A great man-hunt was organized. The mountain passes were p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huntsville, capture of. (search)
Huntsville, capture of. Gen. Ormsby M. Mitchell left Nashville late in March, 1862, and passed through Murfreesboro, Fayetteville, and Huntsville, Ala., reaching the latter point on April 9. As a result the railroad between Stevenson and Decatur, over 100 miles, came into possession of the National forces, thereby cutting off communication between the Confederates east and west. Huntsville, capture of. Gen. Ormsby M. Mitchell left Nashville late in March, 1862, and passed through Murfreesboro, Fayetteville, and Huntsville, Ala., reaching the latter point on April 9. As a result the railroad between Stevenson and Decatur, over 100 miles, came into possession of the National forces, thereby cutting off communication between the Confederates east and west.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McKinly, John 1780- (search)
McKinly, John 1780- ; jurist; born in Culpeper county, Va., May 1, 1780; admitted to the bar of Kentucky in 1801; removed to Huntsville, Ala.; was United States Senator in 1826-31; Representative in Congress in 1833-35. President Van Buren appointed him justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1837, which office he held until his death, in Louisville, Ky., July 19, 1852.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McMinnsville, battle near (search)
ummer of 1862, Generals Bragg and Buell marched in nearly parallel lines eastward towards Chattanooga—the latter north of the Tennessee River, and the former south of it. Bragg won the race, and with fully 40,000 men turned his face towards the Ohio. Bragg divided his force into three corps, commanded respectively by Generals Hardee, Polk, and E. Kirby Smith. The latter was sent to Knoxville, Tenn., while the two former held Chattanooga and its vicinity. Buell disposed his line from Huntsville, Ala., to McMinnsville, Warren co., Tenn. So lay the opposing armies when Kirby Smith left Knoxville to invade Kentucky. Bragg crossed the Tennessee, just above Chattanooga, on Aug. 21, with thirty-six regiments of infantry, five of cavalry, and forty guns. Louisville was his destination. He advanced among the rugged mountains towards Buell's left at McMinnsville as a feint, but fairly flanked the Nationals. This was a cavalry movement, which resulted in a battle there. The horsemen were
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