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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 360 128 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 94 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 70 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 8 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 42 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 38 2 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 37 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 24, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Huntsville (Alabama, United States) or search for Huntsville (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

adi had been burned by incendiary fires. Miscellaneous. A fire occurred at Gloucester, Mass., on the 18th inst., destroying about seventy-five buildings. A dispatch, dated at 10 A. M., says "the fire is still raging with unabated violence. The engines are all frozen up, and it is next to impossible to work them." Twenty-six of the officers who escaped from the Libby prison have arrived at Washington. Col. Streight's name is not appended to their "card of thanks" to Beast Butler. The steamer Oriental was recently sunk at Dog Tooth Bend, on the Mississippi: 23 lives lost. The boat was laden with Government stores. The steamer Constitution, which left San Francisco on the 13th, had $1,500,000 in gold on board for the United States Government. Gen. Logan had penetrated the State of Alabama to Sand Mountain, 40 miles from Huntsville. The proceedings of Congress on the 18th were unimportant. Gold in New York on the 17th was dull, closing at 160½.
Greenbacks and Gold North. --An exile, who recently came out from Huntsville, has a long and interesting letter in the Atlanta Appeal, from which we extract the following: Greenbacks are 2½ for one in gold in Huntsville, and though the money quotations in the Northern papers place them 159 to 160, the truth is, two monHuntsville, and though the money quotations in the Northern papers place them 159 to 160, the truth is, two months ago, in New York, Wall street, no "operation" could be performed at less rate than two for one. The Yankee troops in Huntsville, whose term of service has expired, are converting their greenbacks into Confederate currency to take home. I state this for an incontrovertible fact, not in one instance only, but I witnessed severrk, Wall street, no "operation" could be performed at less rate than two for one. The Yankee troops in Huntsville, whose term of service has expired, are converting their greenbacks into Confederate currency to take home. I state this for an incontrovertible fact, not in one instance only, but I witnessed several of the same.