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Price, and that he is on the retreat. The next paragraph gives out that they themselves are on the retreat, and are greatly disturbed about Price's movements. Kansas City is in Missouri, at the mouth of the Kansas river where it empties into the Missouri; it is four miles from Westport, and was formerly known as Westport landing.Westport, and was formerly known as Westport landing. On the opposite side of Kansas river is the town of Wyandotte. Independence is sixteen miles lower down the river, and is a place of some importance, having been for years past the out-fitting point and rendezvous for Santa Fetraders. Taking all the Yankee accounts into consideration, the enemy are on the retreat towards the KWestport landing. On the opposite side of Kansas river is the town of Wyandotte. Independence is sixteen miles lower down the river, and is a place of some importance, having been for years past the out-fitting point and rendezvous for Santa Fetraders. Taking all the Yankee accounts into consideration, the enemy are on the retreat towards the Kansas line, and Price is following up with a portion of his army; at least a third of his command, including Clark, Shelby, Anderson and others, being engaged in operations on the north side of the Missouri river. Had there been any likelihood of the campaign of Price proving a failure, he would have seen it long since, and r
ximity of the Confederates to it. Sherman, it says, has been compelled to leave one corps in a state of siege in Atlanta, and now has to go forth to fight Hood in his own chosen position. On the 18th; Hood was reported one mile below Lafayette, and Sherman at Villason, six miles from him. Hood, according to Yankee accounts, is being heavily reinforced, including Walker's division from the Trans-Mississippi. The only intelligence from General Price is the following telegram from Kansas City, Missouri, on Monday: A courier just from the front reports that Price is in full retreat and closely pursued by our forces.--When the courier left the enemy was twenty-five miles south of here. A letter from Butler's army says of the recent gunboat fight in the James: Yesterday morning, two new batteries which had been constructed by General Butler on James river, near Chaffin's Bluff, opened on the rebel gunboats in the vicinity, and drove them all, except a stubborn iron-c
twithstanding the blazing telegrams of the Yankee press about the defeat of Price, it is extremely doubtful it there has been any reverse to our arms. A simple paragraph in a late Baltimore paper says: "It is rumored that Rosecrans has met with a reverse in Missouri. There is a report abroad in this city that Price, having been joined by his forces from the north side of the Missouri river, had met Rosecrans and defeated him in a general battle. that Shelby and Clarke had taken Kansas City, at the junction of the Missouri and Kansas rivers. This is a strong position, and completely commands the Missouri river. The Trans-Mississippi. The news from the Trans-Mississippi is encouraging. General Stand Watie, on the 19th ultimo, captured one of the enemy's posts north of the Arkansas river, with two hundred and fifty wagons and one hundred and twenty prisoners. General Magruder is in Arkansas, attending to Steele, and Shelby is on the Arkansas line, protecting the comm
The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1864., [Electronic resource], Vice-President Stephens's and Sherman's Proposition to negotiate. (search)
probable view of contesting Price's entrance into Arkansas. The Union loss in the battle of the 23d was seventy-five. The wounded were sent to Leavenworth on Monday. The rebels were chased all Sunday night. Constant fighting with their rear guard was kept up. At daylight, they made a stand, and were handsomely whipped again. Most of the Kansas militia have gone home. Martial law is abolished and business is resumed. General Rosecrans was at Little Santa Fe, twelve miles south of Kansas City, with his infantry, on Tuesday night. Dispatches in the border papers say that a train from Fort Smith was attacked by bushwhackers south of Fort Scott. Sixteen men were killed and a part of the train burned. About fifteen hundred refugees accompanied the train. About one hundred guerrillas, under Captain Taylor, entered Maramonton, a few miles from Fort Scott, at 12 o'clock on Saturday night, and murdered Colonels Knowles, Brown, Hawkins, McGonigle, Chadwick and Stout, who were en
eral Craig from Major McDynald. He had just reached the railroad from a trip four miles into Richmond county, Kansas. A battle had been fought between the Kansas troops, under Blount, and the Confederates, under Price, on the 19th. Blount was defeated, with the loss of nearly all of his artillery. After, the battle, Price marched into Lexington, and at last accounts was crossing a portion of his forces to the north side of the river. The Republican contains the following: "Kansas City, October 22. "I have been pressed all day. This afternoon the enemy passed around my right flank, when I gave him heavy blows for several hours. I have heard firing to the east, and have just received a message from Pleasanton, who is fighting on the other side. [Signed] S. A. Curtis, "Major-General." A dispatch from Cairo says troops passing down the river yesterday. on transports, were fired on at several points. Three privates were killed and wounded. Scarcely ab
A very desirable reconstruction movement is exhibited in the energy which marks the reopening of the railroads throughout the Southern States, and the plans on foot for extending the old lines and establishing new ones. A dispatch from Kansas City reports that those representing the railroad interests of that section and Texas are in consultation to perfect arrangements for the rapid completion of the important road running from Kansas City to Galveston, and the lines which are to conne desirable reconstruction movement is exhibited in the energy which marks the reopening of the railroads throughout the Southern States, and the plans on foot for extending the old lines and establishing new ones. A dispatch from Kansas City reports that those representing the railroad interests of that section and Texas are in consultation to perfect arrangements for the rapid completion of the important road running from Kansas City to Galveston, and the lines which are to connect with it.
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